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Lynette Reid
Dalhousie University
  1.  19
    Medical Need: Evaluating a Conceptual Critique of Universal Health Coverage.Lynette Reid - 2017 - Health Care Analysis 25 (2):114-137.
    Some argue that the concept of medical need is inadequate to inform the design of a universal health care system—particularly an institutional rather than a residual system. They argue that the concept contradicts the idea of comprehensiveness; leads to unsustainable expenditures; is too indeterminate for policy; and supports only a prioritarian distribution. I argue that ‘comprehensive’ understood as ‘including the full continuum of care’ and ‘medically necessary’ understood as ‘prioritized by medical criteria’ are not contradictory, and that UHC is a (...)
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  2.  22
    Truth or Spin? Disease Definition in Cancer Screening.Lynette Reid - 2017 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 42 (4):385-404.
    Are the small and indolent cancers found in abundance in cancer screening normal variations, risk factors, or disease? Naturalists in philosophy of medicine turn to pathophysiological findings to decide such questions objectively. To understand the role of pathophysiological findings in disease definition, we must understand how they mislead in diagnostic reasoning. Participants on all sides of the definition of disease debate attempt to secure objectivity via reductionism. These reductivist routes to objectivity are inconsistent with the Bayesian nature of clinical reasoning; (...)
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  3.  46
    Diminishing Returns? Risk and the Duty to Care in the Sars Epidemic.Lynette Reid - 2005 - Bioethics 19 (4):348–361.
    The seriousness of the risk that healthcare workers faced during SARS, and their response of service in the face of this risk, brings to light unrealistic assumptions about duty and risk that informed the debate on duty to care in the early years of HIV/AIDS. Duty to care is not based upon particular virtues of the health professions, but arises from social reflection on what response to an epidemic would be consistent with our values and our needs, recognizing our shared (...)
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  4.  11
    Is an Indistinct Picture “Exactly What We Need”? Objectivity, Accuracy, and Harm in Imaging for Cancer.Lynette Reid - 2018 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 24 (5):1055-1064.
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  5.  26
    Answering the Empirical Challenge to Arguments for Universal Health Coverage Based in Health Equity.Lynette Reid - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (3):231-243.
    Temkin asks how we should distribute resources between the social determinants of health and health care; Sreenivasan argues that if our goal is fair opportunity, funding universal health coverage is the wrong policy. He argues that social equality in health has not improved under UHC and concludes that fair opportunity would be better served by using the resources to address the SDOH instead. His criticism applies more broadly than he claims: it applies to any argument for UHC based on health (...)
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  6.  24
    Scientism in Medical Education and the Improvement of Medical Care: Opioids, Competencies, and Social Accountability.Lynette Reid - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (2):155-170.
    Scientism in medical education distracts educators from focusing on the content of learning; it focuses attention instead on individual achievement and validity in its measurement. I analyze the specific form that scientism takes in medicine and in medical education. The competencies movement attempts to challenge old “scientistic” views of the role of physicians, but in the end it has invited medical educators to focus on validity in the measurement of individual performance for attitudes and skills that medicine resists conceptualizing as (...)
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  7.  17
    Concierge, Wellness, and Block Fee Models of Primary Care: Ethical and Regulatory Concerns at the Public–Private Boundary.Lynette Reid - 2017 - Health Care Analysis 25 (2):151-167.
    In bioethics and health policy, we often discuss the appropriate boundaries of public funding; how the interface of public and private purchasers and providers should be organized and regulated receives less attention. In this paper, I discuss ethical and regulatory issues raised at this interface by three medical practice models in which physicians provide insured services while requiring or requesting that patients pay for services or for the non-insured services of the physicians themselves or their associates. This choice for such (...)
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  8.  4
    Introduction to the Special Issue: Precarious Solidarity—Preferential Access in Canadian Health Care.Lynette Reid - 2017 - Health Care Analysis 25 (2):107-113.
    Systems of universal health coverage may aspire to provide care based on need and not ability to pay; the complexities of this aspiration call for normative analysis. This special issue arises in the wake of a judicial inquiry into preferential access in the Canadian province of Alberta, the Vertes Commission. I describe this inquiry and set out a taxonomy of forms of differential and preferential access. Papers in this special issue focus on the conceptual specification of health system boundaries and (...)
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  9.  20
    Does Population Health Have an Intrinsically Distributional Dimension?Lynette Reid - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (1):24-36.
    Verweij and Dawson claim that population health has a distributive dimension; Coggon argues that this presupposes a normative commitment to equity in the very definition of population health, which should, rather, be neutral. I describe possible sources of the distributive view, several of which do not presuppose egalitarian commitments. Two relate to the nature of health as a property of individuals ; two relate to the epistemology and pragmatics of public and population health. A fifth source of the distributive view (...)
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  10.  12
    Piketty and the Body: On the Relevance of Wealth Inequality to BioethicsCapital in the Twenty-First Century, by Thomas Piketty. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2014.Lynette Reid - 2015 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 8 (2):250-265.
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  11.  75
    Wittgenstein’s Ladder: The Tractatus and Nonsense.Lynette Reid - 1998 - Philosophical Investigations 21 (2):97–151.
    I discuss some reservations about the exegetical power of the claim that the Tractatus is “anti-metaphysical.” The “resolute” reading has the virtue of fidelity to important and neglected features of the work, both its anti-metaphysical moves and its account of the nature of the activity of philosophy and its status. However, its proponents underestimate the barriers to maintaining a consistent fidelity to these features of the text. The image of a ladder suggests a mere instrumental means to arrive at a (...)
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  12.  47
    Medical Professionalism and the Social Contract.Lynette Reid - 2011 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (4):455-469.
    The professionalism movement has animated medical education and practice; an extensive literature expresses and categorizes many interpretations of the concept (Hafferty 2006a; Hafferty and Levinson 2008). The inception of the current wave of the movement was in the American Board of Internal Medicine's Project Professionalism. In the face of threats from the growth of managed care and public concerns about conflict of interest, the ABIM's "Physician Charter" called for the profession to publically commit to values of patient welfare, social justice, (...)
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  13.  29
    Brains, Genes, and the Making of the Self.Lynette Reid & Françoise Baylis - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (2):21 – 23.
  14.  60
    Compensation for Gamete Donation: The Analogy with Jury Duty.Lynette Reid, Natalie Ram & R. Brown - 2007 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (1):35-43.
    In Canada, laws and policies consistently reject the commodification of human organs and tissues, and Canadian practice is consistent with international standards in this regard. Until the Assisted Human Reproduction Act of 2004, gamete donation in Canada was an exception: Canadians could pay and be paid open market rates for gametes for use in in vitro fertilization. As sections of the AHR Act forbidding payment for gametes and permitting only reimbursement of receipted expenses gradually came into effect in 2005, Canada (...)
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  15.  15
    Networking Genetics, Populations, and Race.Lynette Reid - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (6-7):50-52.
  16.  27
    The Harm-Benefit Tradeoff in "Bad Deal" Trials.Gillian Nycum & Lynette Reid - 2007 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (4):321-350.
    : This paper examines the nature of the harm-benefit tradeoff in early clinical research for interventions that involve remote possibility of direct benefit and likelihood of direct harms to research participants with fatal prognoses, by drawing on the example of gene transfer trials for glioblastoma multiforme. We argue that the appeal made by the component approach to clinical equipoise fails to account fully for the nature of the harm-benefit tradeoff—individual harm for social benefit—that would be required to justify such research. (...)
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  17.  11
    Nice Work If You Can Get It.Lynette Reid - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (5):27 – 29.
  18.  42
    From the Special Issue Editors.Lynette Reid, Josephine Johnston & Françoise Baylis - 2006 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 3 (1-2):11-13.
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  19.  42
    Wittgenstein: The Philosopher and His Works – Edited by Alois Pichler and Simo Säätelä.Lynette Reid - 2008 - Philosophical Investigations 31 (2):182–190.
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  20.  15
    R. Jay Wallace, The View From Here: On Affirmation, Attachment, and the Limits of Regret . Xi + 268, Price £29.99 Hb. [REVIEW]Lynette Reid - 2014 - Philosophical Investigations 37 (4):389-394.
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  21.  7
    Long-Term Care, Globalization, and Justice, by Lisa A. Eckenwiler.Lynette Reid - 2013 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (1):172-177.
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  22.  10
    Long-Term Care, Globalization, and Justice by Lisa A. Eckenwiler (Review).Lynette Reid - 2013 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (1):172-177.
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  23.  6
    Review of Alan Cribb, Health and the Good Society: Setting Healthcare Ethics in Social Context[REVIEW]Lynette Reid - 2006 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (7).
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