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  1.  74
    Who Knows: From Quine to a Feminist Empiricism.Lynn Hankinson Nelson - 1990 - Temple University Press.
    INTRODUCTION Reopening a Discussion The empiricist-derived epistemology that has directed most social and natural scientific inquiry for the last three ...
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  2. Epistemological Communities.Lynn Hankinson Nelson - 1993 - In Linda Alcoff & Elizabeth Potter (eds.), Feminist Epistemologies. Routledge.
     
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  3. Who Knows: From Quine to a Feminist Empiricism.Lynn Hankinson Nelson - 1992 - Hypatia 7 (1):100-114.
    I argue that Nelson's feminist transformation of empiricism provides the basis of a dialogue across three currently competing feminist epistemologies: feminist empiricism, feminist standpoint theories, and postmodern feminism, a dialogue that will result in a dissolution of the apparent tensions between these epistemologies and provide an epistemology with the openness and fluidity needed to embrace the concerns of feminists.
     
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  4. Feminism, Science, and the Philosophy of Science.Lynn Hankinson Nelson - 1996
     
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  5.  56
    A Question of Evidence.Lynn Hankinson Nelson - 1993 - Hypatia 8 (2):172 - 189.
    I outline a pragmatic account of evidence, arguing that it allows us to underwrite two implications of feminist scholarship: that knowledge is socially constructed and constrained by evidence, and that social relations, including gender, race, and class, are epistemologically significant. What makes the account promising is that it abandons any pretense of a view from nowhere, the view of evidence as something only individuals gather or have, and the view that individual theories face experience in isolation.
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  6. The Very Idea of Feminist Epistemology.Lynn Hankinson Nelson - 1995 - Hypatia 10 (3):31 - 49.
    The juxtaposition encompassed in the phrase "feminist epistemology" strikes some feminist theorists and mainstream epistemologists as incongruous. To others, the phrase signals the view that epistemology and the philosophy of science are not what some of their practitioners and advocates have wanted or claimed them to be-but also are not "dead," as some of their critics proclaim. This essay explores the grounds for and implications of each view and recommends the second.
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  7. A Feminist Naturalized Philosophy of Science.Lynn Hankinson Nelson - 1995 - Synthese 104 (3):399 - 421.
    Building on developments in feminist science scholarship and the philosophy of science, I advocate two methodological principles as elements of a naturalized philosophy of science. One principle incorporates a holistic account of evidence inclusive of claims and theories informed by and/or expressive of politics and non-constitutive values; the second takes communities, rather than individual scientists, to be the primary loci of scientific knowledge. I use case studies to demonstrate that these methodological principles satisfy three criteria for naturalization accepted in naturalized (...)
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  8.  83
    Introduction: Special Issue on Feminist Science Studies.Lynn Hankinson Nelson & Alison Wylie - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (1).
    Feminist analyses of science have grown dramatically in scope, diversity, and impact in the years since Nancy Tuana edited the two-volume issue of Hypatia on “Feminism and Science” (Fall 1987, Spring 1988). What had begun in the 1960s and 1970s as a “trickle of scholarship on feminism and science” had widened by the mid-1980s “into a continuous stream” (Rosser 1987, 5). Fifteen years later, the stream has become something of a torrent. The essays assembled for this special issue of Hypatia (...)
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  9.  29
    No Rush To Judgment.Lynn Hankinson Nelson - 1994 - The Monist 77 (4):486-508.
    One of the lessons we ought to have learned from the history of philosophy and science is that it is rarely, if ever, useful in dealing with challenges from a new movement or in distinguishing one’s position from a different school of thought, to “draw a line in the sand” and claim that everything on this side is legitimate and that everything on that side is not, and can therefore be dismissed without serious consideration or discussion. On some analyses, Plato (...)
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  10.  24
    Feminist Values and Cognitive Virtues.Lynn Hankinson Nelson & Jack Nelson - 1994 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:120 - 129.
    We consider Helen Longino's proposal that "ontological heterogeneity", "complexity of relationship", and "the non-disappearance of gender" are criteria for good science and cannot be separated into cognitive and social virtues. Using a research program in neuroendocrinology investigating a hormonal basis for sex-differentiated lateralization as a case study, the authors disagree concerning whether the first two criteria can be construed as criteria for good science. Concerning the non-disappearance of gender criterion, we argue that its appropriateness is context specific, and that its (...)
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  11. Feminist Interpretations of W. V. Quine.Lynn Hankinson Nelson & Jack Nelson (eds.) - 2003 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    As one of the preeminent philosophers of the twentieth century, W. V. Quine made groundbreaking contributions to the philosophy of science, mathematical logic, and the philosophy of language. This collection of essays examines Quine's views, particularly his holism and naturalism, for their value to feminist theorizing today. Some contributors to this volume see Quine as severely challenging basic tenets of the logico-empiricist tradition in the philosophy of science—the analytic/synthetic distinction, verificationism, foundationalism—and accept various of his positions as potential resources for (...)
     
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  12. Representing Reason: Feminist Theory and Formal Logic.Val Plumwood, Carroll Guen Hart, Dorothea Olkowski, Marie-Genevieve Iselin, Lynn Hankinson Nelson, Jack Nelson, Andrea Nye & Pam Oliver - 2002 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Philosophy's traditional "man of reason"—independent, neutral, unemotional—is an illusion. That's because the "man of reason" ignores one very important thing—the woman. Representing Reason: Feminist Theory and Formal Logic collects new and old essays that shed light on the underexplored intersection of logic and feminism.
     
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  13.  13
    Critical Notice.Lynn Hankinson Nelson - 1994 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 24 (2):295-326.
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  14.  24
    What Can She Know?Lynn Hankinson Nelson - 1994 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 24 (2):295-326.
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  15.  17
    Feminist Philosophy of Science1.Lynn Hankinson Nelson - 2002 - In Peter Machamer Michael Silberstein (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Science. Blackwell. pp. 312.
  16.  16
    The Descent of Evolutionary Explanations: Darwinian Vestiges in the Social Sciences.Lynn Hankinson Nelson - forthcoming - Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
  17.  8
    What Can She Know?: Feminist Theory and the Construction of Knowledge. [REVIEW]Lynn Hankinson Nelson - 1994 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 24 (2):295-326.
  18. How Knowers Emerge and Why This is Important to Future Work in Naturalized Epistemology.Lynn Hankinson Nelson & Jack Nelson - 2009 - In John R. Shook & Paul Kurtz (eds.), The Future of Naturalism. Humanity Books.
     
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  19. Some Remarks on the Issues Feminist Critiques of Science Raise for Empiricism.Lynn Hankinson Nelson - 1987 - Dissertation, Temple University
    I consider the issues that recent feminist critiques of science raise for contemporary empiricist philosophy of science. Three particular focuses of feminist criticism are addressed: the social arrangements within and outside science communities that divide cognitive labor and authority, the apparent androcentrism in several of the social and biological sciences, and the use of models that reflect Western political experience in the biological sciences. ;I urge that a consideration of these issues indicate that science communities interact with our larger society (...)
     
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