12 found
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  1.  2
    Public Participation Methods: A Framework for Evaluation.Lynn J. Frewer & Gene Rowe - 2000 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 25 (1):3-29.
    There is a growing call for greater public involvement in establishing science and technology policy, in line with democratic ideals. A variety of public participation procedures exist that aim to consult and involve the public, ranging from the public hearing to the consensus conference. Unfortunately, a general lack of empirical consideration of the quality of these methods arises from confusion as to the appropriate benchmarks for evaluation. Given that the quality of the output of any participation exercise is difficult to (...)
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  2.  1
    A Typology of Public Engagement Mechanisms.Lynn J. Frewer & Gene Rowe - 2005 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 30 (2):251-290.
    Imprecise definition of key terms in the “public participation” domain have hindered the conduct of good research and militated against the development and implementation of effective participation practices. In this article, we define key concepts in the domain: public communication, public consultation, and public participation. These concepts are differentiated according to the nature and flow of information between exercise sponsors and participants. According to such an information flow perspective, an exercise’s effectiveness may be ascertained by the efficiency with which full, (...)
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  3.  3
    Evaluating Public-Participation Exercises: A Research Agenda.Lynn J. Frewer & Gene Rowe - 2004 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 29 (4):512-556.
    The concept of public participation is one of growing interest in the UK and elsewhere, with a commensurate growth in mechanisms to enable this. The merits of participation, however, are difficult to ascertain, as there are relatively few cases in which the effectiveness of participation exercises have been studied in a structured manner. This seems to stem largely from uncertainty in the research community as to how to conduct evaluations. In this article, one agenda for conducting evaluation research that might (...)
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  4.  22
    A Systematic Review of Public Attitudes, Perceptions and Behaviours Towards Production Diseases Associated with Farm Animal Welfare.Beth Clark, Gavin B. Stewart, Luca A. Panzone, I. Kyriazakis & Lynn J. Frewer - 2016 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (3):455-478.
    Increased productivity may have negative impacts on farm animal welfare in modern animal production systems. Efficiency gains in production are primarily thought to be due to the intensification of production, and this has been associated with an increased incidence of production diseases, which can negatively impact upon FAW. While there is a considerable body of research into consumer attitudes towards FAW, the extent to which this relates specifically to a reduction in production diseases in intensive systems, and whether the increased (...)
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  5.  21
    Gene Technology, Food Production, and Public Opinion: A UK Study. [REVIEW]Paul Sparks, Richard Shepherd & Lynn J. Frewer - 1994 - Agriculture and Human Values 11 (1):19-28.
    In this paper, dimensions of the debate surrounding the application of gene technology to food production are discussed and a study assessing perceptions of the technology among a sample of the UK public (n = 1499) is reported. The general picture that emerges from the study is one of people expressing low familiarity with the technology, with more people associating it with high risks than with low risks, and more people expecting it to provide low benefits than high benefits. Attitudes (...)
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  6.  1
    Maximizing the Policy Impacts of Public Engagement: A European Study.Lynn J. Frewer, Henk A. J. Mulder & Steven B. Emery - 2015 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 40 (3):421-444.
    There is a lack of published evidence which demonstrates the impacts of public engagement in science and technology policy. This might represent the failure of PE to achieve policy impacts or indicate a lack of effective procedures for discerning the uptake by policy makers of PE-derived outputs. While efforts have been made to identify and categorize different types of policy impact, research has rarely attempted to link policy impact with PE procedures, political procedures, or the connections between them. In this (...)
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  7.  29
    Ethical Concerns and Risk Perceptions Associated with Different Applications of Genetic Engineering: Interrelationships with the Perceived Need for Regulation of the Technology. [REVIEW]Lynn J. Frewer & Richard Shepherd - 1995 - Agriculture and Human Values 12 (1):48-57.
    The development of genetic engineering and its plausible consequences raises a level of controversy that can be identified at the level of public rather than scientific debate. Opposition to genetic engineering may manifest itself in rejection of the technology overall, or rejection of specific aspects of the technology, where public attitudes may be defined by a complex set of perceptions incorporating risk, benefit, control, and ethical concerns.One hundred and seventy six members of the public responded to questionnaires about genetic engineering (...)
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  8.  13
    Ethical Issues and Potential Stakeholder Priorities Associated with the Application of Genomic Technologies Applied to Animal Production Systems.David Coles, Lynn J. Frewer & Ellen Goddard - 2015 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (2):231-253.
    This study considered the range of ethical issues and potential stakeholder priorities associated with the application of genomic technologies applied to animal production systems, in particular those which utilised genomic technologies in accelerated breeding rather than the application of genetic modification. A literature review was used to inform the development of an ethical matrix, which was used to scope the potential perspectives of different agents regarding the acceptability of genomic technologies, as opposed to genetic modification techniques applied to animal production (...)
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  9.  26
    The Influence of Initial Attitudes on Responses to Communication About Genetic Engineering in Food Production.Lynn J. Frewer, Chaya Howard & Richard Shepherd - 1998 - Agriculture and Human Values 15 (1):15-30.
    Source credibility has been thought to bean important determinant of peoples‘ reactions toinformation about technology. There has also been muchdebate about the need to communicate effectively withthe public about genetic engineering, particularlywithin the context of food production. Questionnaireswere used to investigate the impact of sourcecredibility, admission of risk uncertainty, andinitial attitude towards genetic engineering onattitudes of respondents after information provision.120 respondents with positive attitudes towardsgenetic engineering in food production were providedwith persuasive information about the technology,where both source attribution and admission (...)
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  10.  19
    ‘Objection’ Mapping in Determining Group and Individual Concerns Regarding Genetic Engineering.Lynn J. Frewer, Duncan Hedderley, Chaya Howard & Richard Shepherd - 1997 - Agriculture and Human Values 14 (1):67-79.
    Whilst there has been much debateregarding the importance of public acceptance ofgenetic engineering and its applications, there isevidence to indicate that objections to the technologyare likely to focus on specific applications of thetechnology, rather than genetic engineering per se.Thus it becomes important to examine the extent ofobjections associated with individual applications,rather than to assess public feeling regarding thetechnology overall. Survey data were collected from200 respondents regarding their objections to generalapplications of genetic engineering. Similar objectiondata were collected from 200 different respondents,who (...)
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  11. Evaluation of a Deliberative Conference.Lynn J. Frewer, Roy Marsh & Gene Rowe - 2004 - Science, Technology and Human Values 29 (1):88-121.
    The concept of “public participation” is currently one of great interest to researchers and policy makers. In response to a perceived need for greater public involvement in decision making and policy formation processes on the part of both policymakers and the general public, a variety of novel mechanisms have been developed, such as the consensus conference and citizens jury, to complement traditional mechanisms, such as the public meeting. However, the relative effectiveness of the various mechanisms is unclear, as efforts at (...)
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  12. Public Concerns in the United Kingdom About General and Specific Applications of Genetic Engineering: Risk, Benefit, and Ethics.Richard Shepherd, Chaya Howard & Lynn J. Frewer - 1997 - Science, Technology and Human Values 22 (1):98-124.
    The repertory grid method was used to determine what terminology respondents use to distinguish between different applications of genetic engineering drawn from food- related, agricultural, and medical applications. Respondents were asked to react to fifteen applications phrased in general terms, and results compared with a second study where fifteen more specific applications were used as stimuli. Both sets of data were submitted to generalized Procrustes analysis. Applications associated with animals or human genetic material were described as causing ethical concern, being (...)
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