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M. Dyson [21]Michael Eric Dyson [4]Michael Dyson [2]Matthew Dyson [1]
Maynard Dyson [1]
  1.  43
    The Structure of The Laws' Speech In Plato's Crito.M. Dyson - 1978 - Classical Quarterly 28 (2):427-436.
    The argument attributed to the Laws of Athens at Crito 50 a ff. relies on three main propositions, firstly that disobedience to law harms persons, secondly that the relationship between citizen and state is analogous to that between child and parent, and thirdly that the citizen makes a tacit compact to obey the laws. The connection between these three is not entirely clear and I shall consider how the first proposition is related to the second, and then how the second (...)
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  2.  35
    Pride: The Seven Deadly Sins.Michael Eric Dyson - 2006 - Oup Usa.
    Dyson explores the fate of pride from Christain theology to the social responsibilities of self-regard and regard for the society as a whole. Also discusses pride in black communities.
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  3.  24
    Catullus 8 and 76.M. Dyson - 1973 - Classical Quarterly 23 (1):127-143.
    Two of the most moving personal poems of Catullus, 8 and 76, present the reader with difficulties of interpretation which highlight the inadequacy of a very widely-held view of the nature of Catullus' personal poetry. In this view the poet is regarded as handling his own actual experience directly, so that the poems present reality, perhaps not entirely, but certainly to a degree that is not the case with the elegiac poets or with the Horace of the Odes. Extreme forms (...)
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  4.  24
    Knowledge and Hedonism in Plato's Protagoras.M. Dyson - 1976 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 96:32-45.
    The argument in theProtagoraswhich starts with an analysis of giving in to pleasure in terms of ignorance, and leads into a demonstration that courage is knowledge, is certainly one of the most brilliant in Plato and equally certainly one of the trickiest. My discussion deals mainly with three problems: Precisely what absurdity is detected in the popular account of moral weakness, and where is it located in the text? On the basis of largely formal considerations I believe that the absurdity (...)
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  5.  15
    Aeschylus, Agamemnon 355–8.M. Dyson - 1971 - The Classical Review 21 (02):170-.
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  6.  22
    Where Are You Going to, My Pretty Maids?M. Dyson - 1972 - The Classical Review 22 (03):311-313.
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  7.  18
    Zeus and Philosophy in the Myth of Plato’s Phaedrus.M. Dyson - 1982 - Classical Quarterly 32 (02):307-.
    The matter which I wish to discuss is a discrepancy between two accounts of the origin of the philosopher in the myth of Plato's Phaedrus. Before their incarnation the souls of all humans are imagined as having enjoyed the vision of reality, but not all in the same company or to the same degree. For, in the first place, the souls are distributed among the companies that severally follow eleven different gods, 247 a-b, a distribution which is regarded as important (...)
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  8.  14
    Lucretius, 4.420–25.Michael Dyson - 1995 - Classical Quarterly 45 (01):253-.
    This passage occurs in a series of examples of optical illusions which Lucretius provides in order to illustrate the way in which the mind can misinterpret the evidence of the senses. There are no manuscript variations relevant to the problem which I wish to discuss. The situation envisaged is that in fording a swift river, a horse has come to a halt in mid-stream. ‘We’, that is, the rider, look down into the rushing water and get the impression that our (...)
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  9.  8
    Alcestis' Children and the Character of Admetus.M. Dyson - 1988 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 108:13-23.
    By comparison with Aeschylus and Sophocles, Euripides makes remarkable use of young children in his tragedies. There are vocal parts, sung by individual children inAlcestisandAndromache, cries off for the two boys inMedea, and a song for a supplementary chorus of boys inSupplices. Important episodes concern silent children on stage inHeraclesandTroades, lesser roles occur inHecubaandIphigeneia in Aulis, and suppliant children may be on stage throughoutHeracleidae. No children figure in the extant plays of Aeschylus, and Sophocles gives them silent parts only inAjaxandOedipus (...)
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  10.  10
    Oracle, Edict, and Curse in Oedipus Tyrannus.M. Dyson - 1973 - Classical Quarterly 23 (02):202-.
    Apollo's oracle gives specific instructions concerning the treatment of the murderer of Laius. Oedipus issues an edict of excommunication and bindshimself under a curse. I wish to examine the relationship between these three pronouncements as they occur initially and as they are used throughout the play. The basis of what I have to say is tentative in that it consists in a particular interpretation of Oedipus' addres, 216 ff., and in the assumption that Sophocles employed a distinction between an edict, (...)
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  11.  10
    A Note on Virgil, Aeneid 5.315–19.M. Dyson - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (02):569-572.
    The meaning of the expression simul ultima signant in Virgil's description of the foot race in the memorial funeral games for Anchises has been controversial since ancient times. The interpretation implied by R. A. B. Mynors's Oxford text printed above is that the word simul in line 317 is a conjunction and that the expression refers to the final section of the race. The sense presumably is: ‘As soon as they trod the last stretch’ Nisus came out in front, whereas (...)
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  12.  10
    Avarice and Discontent in Horace's First Satire.M. Dyson - 1980 - Classical Quarterly 30 (01):133-.
    In Satires 1.1 Horace asks the question why people are discontented and praise the fortunes of others, and he gives the answer that they are greedy. The precise connection between question and answer is however far from clear, and some commentators have felt that Horace has combined two separate themes of avarice and discontent without establishing a causal link between them. The great obstacle for critics who argue for thematic unity is to explain how it is that the malcontents of (...)
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  13.  6
    Characterizing the Level of Risk in Pediatric Research: An Ethical Examination of the Federal Regulations.Maynard Dyson & Kayhan Parsi - 2010 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 21 (3):212.
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  14.  7
    Euripides, Medea 926–31.M. Dyson - 1988 - Classical Quarterly 38 (02):324-.
    The above is the text of Medea 922–33 and a selection of the critical apparatus from the Oxford text edited by J. Diggle. In his discussion of the variant readings at 926 Diggle leaves open the choice between θήσομαι and θήσω. It seems to me worth noticing that an old proposal of Theodor Ladewig to transpose 926–8 and 929–31, which has in any case much to commend it, has a bearing on the solution of this problem.
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  15.  2
    Prometheus and the Wedge: Text and Staging at Aeschylus, PV 54–81.M. Dyson - 1994 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 114:154-156.
  16.  2
    Vergil, Aeneid 4.543.M. Dyson - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (01):214-.
    In his vigorous analysis of Dido's soliloquy J. Henry confronts the problem of line 543: ‘How comes it that, having just decided that she will not go with the Trojans, that they would not even receive her if she went, she so immediately inquires shall she go with them, alone or accompanied?’ He suggests that the words introduce ‘a new category of objections’; hitherto the issue has been between herself and the Trojans, but now she reflects that the Trojans are (...)
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  17.  4
    This is the Day: The March on Washington.Leonard Freed, Julian Bond, Michael Eric Dyson & Paul Farber - 2013 - J. Paul Getty Museum.
    Compiles the photographs taken by Leonard Freed of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, during which Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech.
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