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Michael Martin [169]Mike W. Martin [68]M. Martín [20]Michael G. F. Martin [19]
M. G. F. Martin [17]Mario Toboso Martín [17]María Martín [15]Maryanne Martin [15]

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Mike Martin
University College London
Michael Martin
Temple University
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  1. The Transparency of Experience.Michael G. F. Martin - 2002 - Mind and Language 17 (4):376-425.
    A common objection to sense-datum theories of perception is that they cannot give an adequate account of the fact that introspection indicates that our sensory experiences are directed on, or are about, the mind-independent entities in the world around us, that our sense experience is transparent to the world. In this paper I point out that the main force of this claim is to point out an explanatory challenge to sense-datum theories.
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  2. The Limits of Self-Awareness.Michael G. F. Martin - 2004 - Philosophical Studies 120 (1-3):37-89.
    The disjunctive theory of perception claims that we should understand statements about how things appear to a perceiver to be equivalent to statements of a disjunction that either one is perceiving such and such or one is suffering an illusion (or hallucination); and that such statements are not to be viewed as introducing a report of a distinctive mental event or state common to these various disjoint situations. When Michael Hinton first introduced the idea, he suggested that the burden of (...)
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  3. On Being Alienated.Michael G. F. Martin - 2006 - In Tamar S. Gendler & John Hawthorne (eds.), Perceptual Experience. Oxford University Press.
    Disjunctivism about perceptual appearances, as I conceive of it, is a theory which seeks to preserve a naïve realist conception of veridical perception in the light of the challenge from the argument from hallucination. The naïve realist claims that some sensory experiences are relations to mind-independent objects. That is to say, taking experiences to be episodes or events, the naïve realist supposes that some such episodes have as constituents mind-independent objects. In turn, the disjunctivist claims that in a case of (...)
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  4. Particular Thoughts & Singular Thought.M. G. F. Martin - 2002 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 51:173-214.
    A long-standing theme in discussion of perception and thought has been that our primary cognitive contact with individual objects and events in the world derives from our perceptual contact with them. When I look at a duck in front of me, I am not merely presented with the fact that there is at least one duck in the area, rather I seem to be presented withthisthing in front of me, which looks to me to be a duck. Furthermore, such a (...)
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  5. Sight and Touch.Michael Martin - 1992 - In Tim Crane (ed.), The Contents of Experience. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  6. Bodily Awareness: A Sense of Ownership.Michael G. F. Martin - 1995 - In Jose Luis Bermudez, Anthony J. Marcel & Naomi M. Eilan (eds.), The Body and the Self. MIT Press. pp. 267–289.
  7. Atheism: A Philosophical Justification.Michael Martin - 1992 - Temple University Press.
    "Thousands of philosophers--from the ancient Greeks to modern thinkers--have defended atheism, but none more comprehensively than Martin.
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  8. What's in a Look?M. G. F. Martin - 2010 - In Bence Nanay (ed.), Perceiving the World. Oxford University Press. pp. 160--225.
  9. Setting Things Before the Mind.Michael G. F. Martin - 1998 - In Anthony O'Hear (ed.), Current Issues in Philosophy of Mind. Cambridge University Press. pp. 157--179.
    Listening to someone from some distance in a crowded room you may experience the following phenomenon: when looking at them speak, you may both hear and see where the source of the sounds is; but when your eyes are turned elsewhere, you may no longer be able to detect exactly where the voice must be coming from. With your eyes again fixed on the speaker, and the movement of her lips a clear sense of the source of the sound will (...)
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  10. Perception, Concepts, and Memory.Michael G. F. Martin - 1992 - Philosophical Review 101 (4):745-63.
  11. Out of the Past: Episodic Recall as Retained Acquaintance.Michael G. F. Martin - 2001 - In Christoph Hoerl & Teresa McCormack (eds.), Time and Memory. Oxford University Press. pp. 257--284.
    Book description: The capacity to represent and think about time is one of the most fundamental and least understood aspects of human cognition and consciousness. This book throws new light on central issues in the study of the mind by uniting, for the first time, psychological and philosophical approaches dealing with the connection between temporal representation and memory. Fifteen specially written essays by leading psychologists and philosophers investigate the way in which time is represented in memory, and the role memory (...)
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  12. 6 The Reality of Appearances.M. G. F. Martin - 1997 - In Heather Logue & Alex Byrne (eds.), Disjunctivism: Contemporary Readings. MIT Press. pp. 91.
  13.  9
    Beyond the ‘East–West’ Dichotomy: Global Variation in Cultural Models of Selfhood.Vivian L. Vignoles, Ellinor Owe, Maja Becker, Peter B. Smith, Matthew J. Easterbrook, Rupert Brown, Roberto González, Nicolas Didier, Diego Carrasco, Maria Paz Cadena, Siugmin Lay, Seth J. Schwartz, Sabrina E. Des Rosiers, Juan A. Villamar, Alin Gavreliuc, Martina Zinkeng, Robert Kreuzbauer, Peter Baguma, Mariana Martin, Alexander Tatarko, Ginette Herman, Isabelle de Sauvage, Marie Courtois, Ragna B. Garðarsdóttir, Charles Harb, Inge Schweiger Gallo, Paula Prieto Gil, Raquel Lorente Clemares, Gabriella Campara, George Nizharadze, Ma Elizabeth J. Macapagal, Baland Jalal, David Bourguignon, Jianxin Zhang, Shaobo Lv, Aneta Chybicka, Masaki Yuki, Xiao Zhang, Agustín Espinosa, Aune Valk, Sami Abuhamdeh, Benjamin Amponsah, Emre Özgen, E. Ülkü Güner, Nil Yamakoğlu, Phatthanakit Chobthamkit, Tom Pyszczynski, Pelin Kesebir, Elvia Vargas Trujillo, Paola Balanta, Boris Cendales Ayala, Silvia H. Koller, Jas Laile Jaafar, Nicolay Gausel, Ronald Fischer, Taciano L. Milfont, Ersin Kusdil & Se Çağlar - 2016 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 145 (8):966-1000.
  14. Meaningful Work: Rethinking Professional Ethics.Mike W. Martin - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
    As commonly understood, professional ethics consists of shared duties and episodic dilemmas--the responsibilities incumbent on all members of specific professions joined together with the dilemmas that arise when these responsibilities conflict. Martin challenges this "consensus paradigm" as he rethinks professional ethics to include personal commitments and ideals, of which many are not mandatory. Using specific examples from a wide range of professions, including medicine, law, high school teaching, journalism, engineering, and ministry, he explores how personal commitments motivate, guide, and give (...)
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  15. Elusive Objects.M. Martin - 2017 - Topoi 36 (2):247-271.
    Do we directly perceive physical objects? What is the significance of the qualification ‘directly’ here? Austin famously denied that there was a unique interpretation by which we could make sense of the traditional debate in the philosophy of perception. I look here at Thompson Clarke’s discussion of G. E. Moore and surface perception to answer Austin’s scepticism.
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  16. The Reality of Appearances.Michael G. F. Martin - 1997 - In M. Sainsbury (ed.), Thought and Ontology. Franco Angeli.
     
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  17. Sounds and Images.M. G. F. Martin - 2012 - British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (4):331-351.
  18. Setting Things Before the Mind: M.G.F. Martin.M. G. F. Martin - 1998 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 43:157-179.
    Listening to someone from some distance in a crowded room you may experience the following phenomenon: when looking at them speak, you may both hear and see where the source of the sounds is; but when your eyes are turned elsewhere, you may no longer be able to detect exactly where the voice must be coming from. With your eyes again fixed on the speaker, and the movement of her lips a clear sense of the source of the sound will (...)
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  19. Sense, Reference and Selective Attention.John Campbell & Michael Martin - 1997 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71 (71):55-98.
    Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71 (1997), 55-74, with a reply by Michael Martin.
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  20. Atheism, a Philosophical Justification.Michael Martin - 1993 - Religious Studies 29 (4):543-553.
     
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  21. Beyond Dispute: Sense-Data, Intentionality, and the Mind-Body Problem.Michael G. F. Martin - 2000 - In Tim Crane & Sarah A. Patterson (eds.), The History of the Mind-Body Problem. Routledge.
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  22. An Eye Directed Outward.Michael G. F. Martin - 1998 - In Crispin Wright, Barry C. Smith & Cynthia Macdonald (eds.), Knowing Our Own Minds. Oxford University Press.
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  23. V—The Rational Role of Experience.Michael G. F. Martin - 1993 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 93 (1):71-88.
  24.  9
    The Potential Role for Cognitive Training in Sport: More Research Needed.Courtney C. Walton, Richard J. Keegan, Mike Martin & Harry Hallock - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  25. Shibboleth: Some Comments on William Fish’s Perception, Hallucination & Illusion. [REVIEW]M. G. F. Martin - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 163 (1):37-48.
  26. Problems with Heaven.Michael Martin - 2015 - In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 427-440.
    Belief in Heaven is an essential part of the great monotheistic religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Famous theologians have written about it, and ordinary theists hope to go there after death. However, the concept of Heaven is neither clear nor unproblematic. There are three serious problems with the notion of Heaven. First, the concept of Heaven lacks coherence. Second, it is doubtful that theists can reconcile the heavenly character of Heaven with standard defenses against the argument from evil, such (...)
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  27. 13 The Limits of Self-Awareness.M. G. F. Martin - 2009 - In Heather Logue & Alex Byrne (eds.), Disjunctivism: Contemporary Readings. MIT Press. pp. 271.
  28.  13
    Effect of Mood on Lexical Decisions.David M. Clark, John D. Teasdale, Donald E. Broadbent & Maryanne Martin - 1983 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 21 (3):175-178.
  29. Self–Observation.M. G. F. Martin - 1997 - European Journal of Philosophy 5 (2):119–140.
  30. Personal Meaning and Ethics in Engineering.Mike W. Martin - 2002 - Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (4):545-560.
    The study of engineering ethics tends to emphasize professional codes of ethics and, to lesser degrees, business ethics and technology studies. These are all important vantage points, but they neglect personal moral commitments, as well as personal aesthetic, religious, and other values that are not mandatory for all members of engineering. This paper illustrates how personal moral commitments motivate, guide, and give meaning to the work of engineers, contributing to both self-fulfillment and public goods. It also explores some general frameworks (...)
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  31.  35
    Self-Deception and Morality.Mike W. Martin - 1988 - Philosophical Review 97 (3):442-444.
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  32. The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case Against Life After Death.Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.) - 2015 - Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.
    Because every single one of us will die, most of us would like to know what—if anything—awaits us afterward, not to mention the fate of lost loved ones. Given the nearly universal vested interest we personally have in deciding this question in favor of an afterlife, it is no surprise that the vast majority of books on the topic affirm the reality of life after death without a backward glance. But the evidence of our senses and the ever-gaining strength of (...)
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  33. In the Eye of Another: Comments on Christopher Peacocke’s ‘Interpersonal Self-Consciousness’.M. G. F. Martin - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 170 (1):25-38.
  34. Old Acquaintance: Russell, Memory and Problems with Acquaintance.Mgf Martin - 2015 - Analytic Philosophy 56 (1):1-44.
  35. The Cambridge Companion to Atheism.Michael Martin (ed.) - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this 2007 volume, eighteen of the world's leading scholars present original essays on various aspects of atheism: its history, both ancient and modern, defense and implications. The topic is examined in terms of its implications for a wide range of disciplines including philosophy, religion, feminism, postmodernism, sociology and psychology. In its defense, both classical and contemporary theistic arguments are criticized, and, the argument from evil, and impossibility arguments, along with a non religious basis for morality are defended. These essays (...)
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  36. Perception.Michael Martin - 1998 - In Frank Jackson & Michael Smith (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Contemporary Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
  37. Uncovering Appearances.Michael G. F. Martin - unknown
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  38.  86
    Referential Variance and Scientific Objectivity.Michael Martin - 1971 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 22 (1):17-26.
  39.  5
    Atheism, Morality, and Meaning.Michael Martin - 2002 - Prometheus Books.
    Divided into four parts, this treatise begins with well-known criticisms of nonreligious ethics and then develops an atheistic metaethics. In Part 2, Martin criticizes the Christian foundation of ethics, specifically the ’divine command theory’ and the idea of imitating the life of Jesus as the basis of Christian morality. Part 3 demonstrates that life can be meaningful in the absence of religious belief. Part 4 criticizes the theistic point of view in general terms as well as the specific Christian doctrines (...)
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  40.  16
    Concepts of Science Education: A Philosophical Analysis.Michael Martin - 1972 - Glenview, Ill., Scott, Foresman.
    INTRODUCTION What relevance — if any — does philosophy of science have for science education? Unfortunately, this question has been largely unexplored. ...
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  41.  12
    Sense, Reference and Selective Attention.John Campbell & Michael Martin - 1997 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Supplementary Volumes 71:55-98.
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  42. The Shallows of the Mind.Michael G. F. Martin - 1997 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society:80--98.
     
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  43. Verstehen the Uses of Understanding in Social Science.Michael Martin - 2000
  44.  45
    Atheism.Michael Martin - 1982 - Teaching Philosophy 5 (2):152-155.
  45.  11
    The Impossibility of God.Michael Martin & Ricki Monnier (eds.) - 2003 - Prometheus.
    Most people, believers and nonbelievers alike, are unfamiliar with the variety and force of arguments for the impossibility of God. Yet over recent years a growing number of scholars have been formulating and developing a series of increasingly powerful arguments that the concept of God, as variously understood by the world's major religions and leading theologians, is contradictory in many ways, and therefore God does not and cannot exist. This unique anthology brings together for the first time most of the (...)
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  46. Getting on Top of Oneself: Comments on Self-Expression.M. G. F. Martin - 2010 - Acta Analytica 25 (1):81-88.
    This paper is a critical review of Mitchell Green’s Self-Expression . The principal focus is on Green’s contention that all expression is at route, a form of signalling by an agent or by some mechanism of the organism which has been evolutionary selected for signalling. Starting from the idea that in some but not all expression an agent seeks to express his or her self, I question the centrality of communication to the idea of expression.
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  47.  76
    Raz's The Morality of Freedom: Two Models of Authority.Margaret Martin - 2010 - Jurisprudence 1 (1):63-84.
    Seventeenth century philosophers were pre-occupied with the justification for the use of coercion; the nature and scope of the citizen's duty to obey the law was a central concern. The typical philosophical accounts which attempt to articulate the conditions under which a citizen has an obligation to obey the law tend to fall into two camps: those that ground the obligation to obey the law in consent, and those that ground it in benefits received, or possibly a combination of both. (...)
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  48.  34
    Hurne on Human Excellence.Marie A. Martin - 1992 - Hume Studies 18 (2):383-399.
  49.  27
    Pseudoscience, the Paranormal, and Science Education.Michael Martin - 1994 - Science & Education 3 (4):357-371.
  50.  98
    Happiness and Virtue in Positive Psychology.Mike W. Martin - 2007 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 37 (1):89–103.
    Positive psychologists aspire to study the moral virtues, as well as positive emotions, while retaining scientific objectivity. Within this framework, Martin Seligman, a founder of positive psychology, offers an empirically-based argument for an ancient and venerable theme: happiness can be increased by exercising the virtues. Seligman's project is promising, but it needs to pay greater attention to several methodological matters: greater care in defining happiness, so as to avoid smuggling in value assumptions of the sort suggested by the title of (...)
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