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Michael Parker [50]Malcolm Parker [43]M. Parker [27]Martin Parker [15]
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  1. Three Concepts of Decidability for General Subsets of Uncountable Spaces.Matthew W. Parker - 2003 - Theoretical Computer Science 351 (1):2-13.
    There is no uniquely standard concept of an effectively decidable set of real numbers or real n-tuples. Here we consider three notions: decidability up to measure zero [M.W. Parker, Undecidability in Rn: Riddled basins, the KAM tori, and the stability of the solar system, Phil. Sci. 70(2) (2003) 359–382], which we abbreviate d.m.z.; recursive approximability [or r.a.; K.-I. Ko, Complexity Theory of Real Functions, Birkhäuser, Boston, 1991]; and decidability ignoring boundaries [d.i.b.; W.C. Myrvold, The decision problem for entanglement, in: R.S. (...)
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  2.  24
    Psychiatric Genomics and Mental Health Treatment: Setting the Ethical Agenda.Michael Parker, Michael Dunn & Camillia Kong - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (4):3-12.
    Realizing the benefits of translating psychiatric genomics research into mental health care is not straightforward. The translation process gives rise to ethical challenges that are distinctive from challenges posed within psychiatric genomics research itself, or that form part of the delivery of clinical psychiatric genetics services. This article outlines and considers three distinct ethical concerns posed by the process of translating genomic research into frontline psychiatric practice and policy making. First, the genetic essentialism that is commonly associated with the genomics (...)
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  3.  20
    Ethical Issues in Human Genomics Research in Developing Countries.Jantina de Vries, Susan J. Bull, Ogobara Doumbo, Muntaser Ibrahim, Odile Mercereau-Puijalon, Dominic Kwiatkowski & Michael Parker - 2011 - BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):5.
    BackgroundGenome-wide association studies provide a powerful means of identifying genetic variants that play a role in common diseases. Such studies present important ethical challenges. An increasing number of GWAS is taking place in lower income countries and there is a pressing need to identify the particular ethical challenges arising in such contexts. In this paper, we draw upon the experiences of the MalariaGEN Consortium to identify specific ethical issues raised by such research in Africa, Asia and Oceania.DiscussionWe explore ethical issues (...)
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  4.  54
    Toward Methodological Innovation in Empirical Ethics Research.Michael Dunn, Mark Sheehan, Tony Hope & Michael Parker - 2012 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (4):466-480.
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  5.  28
    Seeking Consent to Genetic and Genomic Research in a Rural Ghanaian Setting: A Qualitative Study of the MalariaGEN Experience. [REVIEW]P. Tindana, S. Bull, L. Amenga-Etego, J. Vries, R. Aborigo, K. Koram, D. Kwiatkowski & M. Parker - 2012 - BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):15-15.
    Seeking consent for genetic and genomic research can be challenging, particularly in populations with low literacy levels, and in emergency situations. All of these factors were relevant to the MalariaGEN study of genetic factors influencing immune responses to malaria in northern rural Ghana. This study sought to identify issues arising in practice during the enrolment of paediatric cases with severe malaria and matched healthy controls into the MalariaGEN study.
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  6.  10
    Doctors’ Perceptions of How Resource Limitations Relate to Futility in End-of-Life Decision Making: A Qualitative Analysis.Eliana Close, Ben P. White, Lindy Willmott, Cindy Gallois, Malcolm Parker, Nicholas Graves & Sarah Winch - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (6):373-379.
    ObjectiveTo increase knowledge of how doctors perceive futile treatments and scarcity of resources at the end of life. In particular, their perceptions about whether and how resource limitations influence end-of-life decision making. This study builds on previous work that found some doctors include resource limitations in their understanding of the concept of futility.SettingThree tertiary hospitals in metropolitan Brisbane, Australia.DesignQualitative study using in-depth, semistructured, face-to-face interviews. Ninety-six doctors were interviewed in 11 medical specialties. Transcripts of the interviews were analysed using thematic (...)
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  7. Set Size and the Part–Whole Principle.Matthew W. Parker - 2013 - Review of Symbolic Logic (4):1-24.
    Recent work has defended “Euclidean” theories of set size, in which Cantor’s Principle (two sets have equally many elements if and only if there is a one-to-one correspondence between them) is abandoned in favor of the Part-Whole Principle (if A is a proper subset of B then A is smaller than B). It has also been suggested that Gödel’s argument for the unique correctness of Cantor’s Principle is inadequate. Here we see from simple examples, not that Euclidean theories of set (...)
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  8. Working with Concepts: The Role of Community in International Collaborative Biomedical Research.V. M. Marsh, D. K. Kamuya, M. J. Parker & C. S. Molyneux - 2011 - Public Health Ethics 4 (1):26-39.
    The importance of communities in strengthening the ethics of international collaborative research is increasingly highlighted, but there has been much debate about the meaning of the term ‘community’ and its specific normative contribution. We argue that ‘community’ is a contingent concept that plays an important normative role in research through the existence of morally significant interplay between notions of community and individuality. We draw on experience of community engagement in rural Kenya to illustrate two aspects of this interplay: (i) that (...)
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  9.  50
    The Best Possible Child.M. Parker - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (5):279-283.
    Julian Savulescu argues for two principles of reproductive ethics: reproductive autonomy and procreative beneficence, where the principle of procreative beneficence is conceptualised in terms of a duty to have the child, of the possible children that could be had, who will have the best opportunity of the best life. Were it to be accepted, this principle would have significant implications for the ethics of reproductive choice and, in particular, for the use of prenatal testing and other reproductive technologies for the (...)
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  10.  45
    Forms of Benefit Sharing in Global Health Research Undertaken in Resource Poor Settings: A Qualitative Study of Stakeholders' Views in Kenya.Geoffrey Lairumbi, Michael Parker, Raymond Fitzpatrick & Michael English - 2012 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7:7.
    Background Increase in global health research undertaken in resource poor settings in the last decade though a positive development has raised ethical concerns relating to potential for exploitation. Some of the suggested strategies to address these concerns include calls for providing universal standards of care, reasonable availability of proven interventions and more recently, promoting the overall social value of research especially in clinical research. Promoting the social value of research has been closely associated with providing fair benefits to various stakeholders (...)
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  11.  33
    Seeking Consent to Genetic and Genomic Research in a Rural Ghanaian Setting: A Qualitative Study of the MalariaGEN Experience. [REVIEW]Paulina Tindana, Susan Bull, Lucas Amenga-Etego, Jantina de Vries, Raymond Aborigo, Kwadwo Koram, Dominic Kwiatkowski & Michael Parker - 2012 - BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):15-.
    Background: Seeking consent for genetic and genomic research can be challenging, particularly in populations with low literacy levels, and in emergency situations. All of these factors were relevant to the MalariaGEN study of genetic factors influencing immune responses to malaria in northern rural Ghana. This study sought to identify issues arising in practice during the enrolment of paediatric cases with severe malaria and matched healthy controls into the MalariaGEN study. Methods: The study used a rapid assessment incorporating multiple qualitative methods (...)
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  12.  5
    “When They See Us, It’s Like They Have Seen the Benefits!”: Experiences of Study Benefits Negotiations in Community-Based Studies on the Kenyan Coast.Dorcas M. Kamuya, Vicki Marsh, Patricia Njuguna, Patrick Munywoki, Michael Parker & Sassy Molyneux - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):90.
    Benefit sharing in health research has been the focus of international debates for many years, particularly in developing countries. Whilst increasing attention is being given to frameworks that can guide researchers to determine levels of benefits to participants, there is little empirical research from developing countries on the practical application of these frameworks, including in situations of extreme poverty and vulnerability. In addition, the voices of those who often negotiate and face issues related to benefits in practice - frontline researchers (...)
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  13. How Gödelian Ontological Arguments Fail.Matthew Parker - manuscript
    Ontological arguments like those of Gödel (1995) and Pruss (2009; 2012) rely on premises that initially seem plausible, but on closer scrutiny are not. The premises have modal import that is required for the arguments but is not immediately grasped on inspection, and which ultimately undermines the simpler logical intuitions that make the premises seem plausible. Furthermore, the notion of necessity that they involve goes unspecified, and yet must go beyond standard varieties of logical necessity. This leaves us little reason (...)
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  14.  5
    Misconceiving “Neutrality” in Bioethics: Rejoinder to “Bioethics and the Myth of Neutrality”.Malcolm Parker - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (2):147-151.
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  15.  22
    Ethics in Practice: The State of the Debate on Promoting the Social Value of Global Health Research in Resource Poor Settings Particularly Africa.Geoffrey M. Lairumbi, Michael Parker, Raymond Fitzpatrick & Michael C. English - 2011 - BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):22.
    BackgroundPromoting the social value of global health research undertaken in resource poor settings has become a key concern in global research ethics. The consideration for benefit sharing, which concerns the elucidation of what if anything, is owed to participants, their communities and host nations that take part in such research, and the obligations of researchers involved, is one of the main strategies used for promoting social value of research. In the last decade however, there has been intense debate within academic (...)
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  16.  14
    Community Engagement Strategies for Genomic Studies in Africa: A Review of the Literature. [REVIEW]Paulina Tindana, Jantina de Vries, Megan Campbell, Katherine Littler, Janet Seeley, Patricia Marshall, Jennifer Troyer, Morisola Ogundipe, Vincent Pius Alibu, Aminu Yakubu & Michael Parker - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):24.
    Community engagement has been recognised as an important aspect of the ethical conduct of biomedical research, especially when research is focused on ethnically or culturally distinct populations. While this is a generally accepted tenet of biomedical research, it is unclear what components are necessary for effective community engagement, particularly in the context of genomic research in Africa.
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  17. Symmetry Arguments Against Regular Probability: A Reply to Recent Objections.Matthew W. Parker - 2018 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 9 (1):8.
    A probability distribution is regular if no possible event is assigned probability zero. While some hold that probabilities should always be regular, three counter-arguments have been posed based on examples where, if regularity holds, then perfectly similar events must have different probabilities. Howson (2017) and Benci et al. (2016) have raised technical objections to these symmetry arguments, but we see here that their objections fail. Howson says that Williamson’s (2007) “isomorphic” events are not in fact isomorphic, but Howson is speaking (...)
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  18.  23
    The Cambridge Medical Ethics Workbook.Donna Dickenson, Richard Huxtable & Michael Parker (eds.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    This new edition of The Cambridge Medical Ethics Workbook builds on the success of the first edition by working from the 'bottom up', with a widely praised case ...
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  19.  16
    Resisting Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases: Dilemmas in the Mass Treatment of Schistosomiasis and Soil-Transmitted Helminths in North-West Uganda.Melissa Parker, Tim Allen & Julie Hastings - 2008 - Journal of Biosocial Science 40 (2):161-181.
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  20.  15
    Understandings of Genomic Research in Developing Countries: A Qualitative Study of the Views of MalariaGEN Participants in Mali.Karim Traore, Susan Bull, Alassane Niare, Salimata Konate, Mahamadou A. Thera, Dominic Kwiatkowski, Michael Parker & Ogobara K. Doumbo - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-10.
    BackgroundObtaining informed consent for participation in genomic research in low-income settings presents specific ethical issues requiring attention. These include the challenges that arise when providing information about unfamiliar and technical research methods, the implications of complicated infrastructure and data sharing requirements, and the potential consequences of future research with samples and data. This study investigated researchers’ and participants’ parents’ experiences of a consent process and understandings of a genome-wide association study of malaria involving children aged five and under in Mali. (...)
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  21.  1
    Deworming Delusions? Mass Drug Administration in East African Schools.Tim Allen & Melissa Parker - 2016 - Journal of Biosocial Science 48 (S1):S116-S147.
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  22.  9
    Will Mass Drug Administration Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis? Evidence From Northern Coastal Tanzania.Melissa Parker & Tim Allen - 2013 - Journal of Biosocial Science 45 (4):517-545.
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  23. Ethics in Collaborative Global Health Research Networks.M. Parker & S. Bull - 2009 - Clinical Ethics 4 (4):165-168.
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  24.  35
    Consulting Communities on Feedback of Genetic Findings in International Health Research: Sharing Sickle Cell Disease and Carrier Information in Coastal Kenya. [REVIEW]Vicki Marsh, Francis Kombe, Raymond Fitzpatrick, Thomas N. Williams, Michael Parker & Sassy Molyneux - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):41.
    International health research in malaria-endemic settings may include screening for sickle cell disease, given the relationship between this important genetic condition and resistance to malaria, generating questions about whether and how findings should be disclosed. The literature on disclosing genetic findings in the context of research highlights the role of community consultation in understanding and balancing ethically important issues from participants’ perspectives, including social forms of benefit and harm, and the influence of access to care. To inform research practice locally, (...)
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  25.  20
    Consent and Assent in Paediatric Research in Low-Income Settings.Phaik Y. Cheah & Michael Parker - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):22.
    In order to involve children in the decision-making process about participation in medical research it is widely recommended that the child’s assent be sought in addition to parental consent. However, the concept of assent is fraught with difficulties, resulting in confusion among researchers and ethics committees alike.
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  26.  14
    Motivations and Perceptions of Community Advisory Boards in the Ethics of Medical Research: The Case of the Thai-Myanmar Border.Khin Maung Lwin, Phaik Y. Cheah, Phaik K. Cheah, Nicholas J. White, Nicholas P. J. Day, Francois Nosten & Michael Parker - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):12.
    Community engagement is increasingly promoted as a marker of good, ethical practice in the context of international collaborative research in low-income countries. There is, however, no widely agreed definition of community engagement or of approaches adopted. Justifications given for its use also vary. Community engagement is, for example, variously seen to be of value in: the development of more effective and appropriate consent processes; improved understanding of the aims and forms of research; higher recruitment rates; the identification of important ethical (...)
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  27.  8
    Genetic Testing of Children: The Need for a Family Perspective.Anneke Lucassen, Guy Widdershoven, Suzanne Metselaar, Angela Fenwick & Michael Parker - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (3):26-28.
  28.  34
    Tailored Medicine: Whom Will It Fit? The Ethics of Patient and Disease Stratification.Andrew Smart, Paul Martin & Michael Parker - 2004 - Bioethics 18 (4):322–343.
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  29.  8
    Concern for Families and Individuals in Clinical Genetics.M. Parker - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (2):70-73.
    Clinical geneticists are increasingly confronted with ethical tensions between their responsibilities to individual patients and to other family members. This paper considers the ethical implications of a “familial” conception of the clinical genetics role. It argues that dogmatic adherence to either the familial or to the individualistic conception of clinical genetics has the potential to lead to significant harms and to fail to take important obligations seriously.Geneticists are likely to continue to be required to make moral judgments in the resolution (...)
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  30.  37
    Two Concepts of Empirical Ethics.Malcolm Parker - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (4):202-213.
    The turn to empirical ethics answers two calls. The first is for a richer account of morality than that afforded by bioethical principlism, which is cast as excessively abstract and thin on the facts. The second is for the facts in question to be those of human experience and not some other, unworldly realm. Empirical ethics therefore promises a richer naturalistic ethics, but in fulfilling the second call it often fails to heed the metaethical requirements related to the first. Empirical (...)
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  31.  6
    Sharing Individual-Level Health Research Data: Experiences, Challenges and a Research Agenda.Phaik Yeong Cheah, Nicholas P. J. Day, Michael Parker & Susan Bull - 2017 - Asian Bioethics Review 9 (4):393-400.
    Since January 2016, the Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit has trialled a data-sharing policy where requests to access research datasets are processed through a Data Access Committee. In this paper, we share our experiences establishing data management systems and data-sharing infrastructure including a data-sharing policy, data access committee and related procedures. We identified a number of practical and ethical challenges including requests for datasets collected without specific or broad consent to data sharing and requests from pharmaceutical companies for data (...)
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  32. The Ethics of Open Access Publishing.Michael Parker - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):16.
    Should those who work on ethics welcome or resist moves to open access publishing? This paper analyses arguments in favour and against the increasing requirement for open access publishing and considers their implications for bioethics research. In the context of biomedical science, major funders are increasingly mandating open access as a condition of funding and such moves are also common in other disciplines. Whilst there has been some debate about the implications of open-access for the social sciences and humanities, there (...)
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  33.  16
    Law as Clinical Evidence: A New ConstitutiveModel of Medical Education and Decision-Making.Malcolm Parker, Lindy Willmott, Ben White, Gail Williams & Colleen Cartwright - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (1):101-109.
    Over several decades, ethics and law have been applied to medical education and practice in a way that reflects the continuation during the twentieth century of the strong distinction between facts and values. We explain the development of applied ethics and applied medical law and report selected results that reflect this applied model from an empirical project examining doctors’ decisions on withdrawing/withholding treatment from patients who lack decision-making capacity. The model is critiqued, and an alternative “constitutive” model is supported on (...)
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  34.  29
    Healthcare Professionals' and Researchers' Understanding of Cancer Genetics Activities: A Qualitative Interview Study.N. Hallowell, S. Cooke, G. Crawford, M. Parker & A. Lucassen - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (2):113-119.
    Aims: To describe individuals’ perceptions of the activities that take place within the cancer genetics clinic, the relationships between these activities and how these relationships are sustained. Design: Qualitative interview study. Participants: Forty individuals involved in carrying out cancer genetics research in either a clinical (n = 28) or research-only (n = 12) capacity in the UK. Findings: Interviewees perceive research and clinical practice in the subspecialty of cancer genetics as interdependent. The boundary between research and clinical practice is described (...)
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  35. More Trouble for Regular Probabilitites.Matthew W. Parker - manuscript
    In standard probability theory, probability zero is not the same as impossibility. But many have suggested that only impossible events should have probability zero. This can be arranged if we allow infinitesimal probabilities, but infinitesimals do not solve all of the problems. We will see that regular probabilities are not invariant over rigid transformations, even for simple, bounded, countable, constructive, and disjoint sets. Hence, regular chances cannot be determined by space-time invariant physical laws, and regular credences cannot satisfy seemingly reasonable (...)
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  36.  17
    Wie hilfreich sind „ethische Richtlinien“ am Einzelfall?Are “Ethics Guidelines” helpful in taking critical treatment decisions?Sandra Bartels, Mike Parker, Tony Hope & Stella Reiter-Theil - 2005 - Ethik in der Medizin 17 (3):191-205.
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  37.  35
    Research Ethics: An Investigation of Patients’ Motivations for Their Participation in Genetics-Related Research.N. Hallowell, S. Cooke, G. Crawford, A. Lucassen & M. Parker - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (1):37-45.
    Design: Qualitative interview study. Participants: Fifty-nine patients with a family history of cancer who attend a regional cancer genetics clinic in the UK were interviewed about their current and previous research experiences. Findings: Interviewees gave a range of explanations for research participation. These were categorised as social—research participation benefits the wider society by progressing science and improving treatment for everyone; familial—research participation may improve healthcare and benefit current or future generations of the participant’s family; and personal—research participation provides therapeutic or (...)
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  38.  5
    The Role of Law in Decisions to Withhold and Withdraw Life-Sustaining Treatment From Adults Who Lack Capacity: A Cross-Sectional Study.Benjamin P. White, Lindy Willmott, Gail Williams, Colleen Cartwright & Malcolm Parker - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (5):327-333.
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  39.  39
    Prevalence of Depression in Granted and Refused Requests for Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide: A Systematic Review.Ilana Levene & Michael Parker - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (4):205-211.
    Next SectionBackground There is an established link between depression and interest in hastened death in patients who are seriously ill. Concern exists over the extent of depression in patients who actively request euthanasia/physician-assisted suicide (PAS) and those who have their requests granted. Objectives To estimate the prevalence of depression in refused and granted requests for euthanasia/PAS and discuss these findings. Methods A systematic review was performed in MEDLINE and PsycINFO in July 2010, identifying studies reporting rates of depression in requests (...)
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  40.  7
    ‘It is an Entrustment’: Broad Consent for Genomic Research and Biobanks in Sub‐Saharan Africa.Paulina Tindana, Sassy Molyneux, Susan Bull & Michael Parker - 2017 - Developing World Bioethics.
    In recent years, there has been an increase in the establishment of biobanks for genetic and genomic studies around the globe. One example of this is the Human Heredity and Health in Africa Initiative, which has established biobanks in the sub-region to facilitate future indigenous genomic studies. The concept of ‘broad consent’ has been proposed as a mechanism to enable potential research participants in biobanks to give permission for their samples to be used in future research studies. However, questions remain (...)
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  41.  32
    Adolescents Care but Don’T Feel Responsible for Farm Animal Welfare.Siobhan M. Abeyesinghe, Jen Jamieson, Lucy Asher, David Allen, Matthew O. Parker, Christopher M. Wathes & Michael J. Reiss - 2015 - Society and Animals 23 (3):269-297.
  42.  20
    Ethical Challenges That Arise at the Community Interface of Health Research: Village Reporters' Experiences in Western Kenya.Tracey Chantler, Faith Otewa, Peter Onyango, Ben Okoth, Frank Odhiambo, Michael Parker & Paul Wenzel Geissler - 2013 - Developing World Bioethics 13 (1):30-37.
    Community Engagement (CE) has been presented by bio-ethicists and scientists as a straightforward and unequivocal good which can minimize the risks of exploitation and ensure a fair distribution of research benefits in developing countries. By means of ethnographic fieldwork undertaken in Kenya between 2007 and 2009 we explored how CE is understood and enacted in paediatric vaccine trials conducted by the Kenyan Medical Research Institute and the US Centers for Disease Control (KEMRI/CDC). In this paper we focus on the role (...)
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  43. Computing the Uncomputable; or, The Discrete Charm of Second-Order Simulacra.Matthew W. Parker - 2009 - Synthese 169 (3):447-463.
    We examine a case in which non-computable behavior in a model is revealed by computer simulation. This is possible due to differing notions of computability for sets in a continuous space. The argument originally given for the validity of the simulation involves a simpler simulation of the simulation, still further simulations thereof, and a universality conjecture. There are difficulties with that argument, but there are other, heuristic arguments supporting the qualitative results. It is urged, using this example, that absolute validation, (...)
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  44.  15
    Stakeholders Understanding of the Concept of Benefit Sharing in Health Research in Kenya: A Qualitative Study.Geoffrey M. Lairumbi, Michael Parker, Raymond Fitzpatrick & Mike C. English - 2011 - BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):20.
    BackgroundThe concept of benefit sharing to enhance the social value of global health research in resource poor settings is now a key strategy for addressing moral issues of relevance to individuals, communities and host countries in resource poor settings when they participate in international collaborative health research.The influence of benefit sharing framework on the conduct of collaborative health research is for instance evidenced by the number of publications and research ethics guidelines that require prior engagement between stakeholders to determine the (...)
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  45.  35
    Capitalism and its Regulation: A Dialogue on Business and Ethics.Martin Parker & Gordon Pearson - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 60 (1):91-101.
    This dialogue engages with the ethics of politics of capitalism, and enacts a debate between two participants who have divergent views on these matters. Beginning with a discussion concerning definitions of capitalism, it moves on to cover issues concerning our different understandings of the costs and benefits of global capitalist systems. This then leads into a debate about the nature and purposes of regulation, in terms of whether regulation is intended to make competition work better for consumers, or to prevent (...)
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  46.  7
    Ethical Translations of Psychiatric Genomics Into Mental Health Practice: Response to Commentaries.Michael Parker, Michael Dunn & Camillia Kong - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (6):3-5.
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  47.  23
    Wie hilfreich sind „ethische Richtlinien“ am Einzelfall?Sandra Bartels, Mike Parker, Tony Hope & Prof Dr Stella Reiter-Theil - 2005 - Ethik in der Medizin 17 (3):191-205.
    Entscheidungen der Therapiebegrenzung und in der Betreuung am Lebensende sind häufig komplex und von ethischen Problemen begleitet. Im Mittelpunkt der Untersuchung steht die entscheidende Frage, wie hilfreich existierende „Ethik-Richtlinien“, die eine ethische Orientierung bei solchen Entscheidungen geben sollen, in der klinischen Praxis tatsächlich sind. Die Frage, welchen Nutzen „Ethik-Richtlinien“ bei der Entscheidungsfindung haben oder haben können, wird hier exemplarisch an einem klinischen Fallbeispiel aus einer Ethik-Kooperationsstudie in der Intensivmedizin analysiert. Vergleichend werden hierzu „Ethik-Richtlinien“ aus Deutschland, der Schweiz und aus Großbritannien (...)
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  48.  43
    Two Into One Won’T Go: Conceptual, Clinical, Ethical and Legal Impedimenta to the Convergence of CAM and Orthodox Medicine. [REVIEW]Malcolm Parker - 2007 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (1):7-19.
    The convergence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and evidence-based medicine (EBM) is a prominent feature of healthcare in western countries, but it is currently undertheorised, and its implications have been insufficiently considered. Two models of convergence are described – the totally integrated evidence-based model (TI) and the multicultural-pluralistic model (MP). Both models are being incorporated into general medical practice. Against the background of the reasons for the increasing utilisation of CAM by the public and by general practitioners, TI-convergence is (...)
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  49.  36
    Stakeholder Democracy: Towards a Multi-Disciplinary View.Andrew Crane, Ciaran Driver, John Kaler, Martin Parker & John Parkinson - 2005 - Business Ethics 14 (1):67–75.
  50.  45
    Whither Our Art? Clinical Wisdom and Evidence-Based Medicine.Malcolm Parker - 2002 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 5 (3):273-280.
    The relationship between evidence-based medicine (EBM) and clinical judgement is the subject of conceptual and practical dispute. For example, EBM and clinical guidelines are seen to increasingly dominate medical decision-making at the expense of other, human elements, and to threaten the art of medicine. Clinical wisdom always remains open to question. We want to know why particular beliefs are held, and the epistemological status of claims based in wisdom or experience. The paper critically appraises a number of claims and distinctions, (...)
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