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  1. Fair Allocation of Scarce Medical Resources in the Time of Covid-19.Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Govind Persad, Ross Upshur, Beatriz Thome, Michael Parker, Aaron Glickman, Cathy Zhang, Connor Boyle & James P. Phillips - 2020 - New England Journal of Medicine:10.1056/NEJMsb2005114.
    Four ethical values — maximizing benefits, treating equally, promoting and rewarding instrumental value, and giving priority to the worst off — yield six specific recommendations for allocating medical resources in the Covid-19 pandemic: maximize benefits; prioritize health workers; do not allocate on a first-come, first-served basis; be responsive to evidence; recognize research participation; and apply the same principles to all Covid-19 and non–Covid-19 patients.
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  2.  55
    Ethics of Instantaneous Contact Tracing Using Mobile Phone Apps in the Control of the COVID-19 Pandemic.Michael J. Parker, Christophe Fraser, Lucie Abeler-Dörner & David Bonsall - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (7):427-431.
    In this paper we discuss ethical implications of the use of mobile phone apps in the control of the COVID-19 pandemic. Contact tracing is a well-established feature of public health practice during infectious disease outbreaks and epidemics. However, the high proportion of pre-symptomatic transmission in COVID-19 means that standard contact tracing methods are too slow to stop the progression of infection through the population. To address this problem, many countries around the world have deployed or are developing mobile phone apps (...)
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  3.  45
    Psychiatric Genomics and Mental Health Treatment: Setting the Ethical Agenda.Michael Parker, Michael Dunn & Camillia Kong - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (4):3-12.
    Realizing the benefits of translating psychiatric genomics research into mental health care is not straightforward. The translation process gives rise to ethical challenges that are distinctive from challenges posed within psychiatric genomics research itself, or that form part of the delivery of clinical psychiatric genetics services. This article outlines and considers three distinct ethical concerns posed by the process of translating genomic research into frontline psychiatric practice and policy making. First, the genetic essentialism that is commonly associated with the genomics (...)
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  4.  37
    Seeking Consent to Genetic and Genomic Research in a Rural Ghanaian Setting: A Qualitative Study of the MalariaGEN Experience. [REVIEW]P. Tindana, S. Bull, L. Amenga-Etego, J. Vries, R. Aborigo, K. Koram, D. Kwiatkowski & M. Parker - 2012 - BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):15-15.
    Seeking consent for genetic and genomic research can be challenging, particularly in populations with low literacy levels, and in emergency situations. All of these factors were relevant to the MalariaGEN study of genetic factors influencing immune responses to malaria in northern rural Ghana. This study sought to identify issues arising in practice during the enrolment of paediatric cases with severe malaria and matched healthy controls into the MalariaGEN study.
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  5.  34
    Ethical Issues in Human Genomics Research in Developing Countries.Jantina de Vries, Susan J. Bull, Ogobara Doumbo, Muntaser Ibrahim, Odile Mercereau-Puijalon, Dominic Kwiatkowski & Michael Parker - 2011 - BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):5.
    BackgroundGenome-wide association studies provide a powerful means of identifying genetic variants that play a role in common diseases. Such studies present important ethical challenges. An increasing number of GWAS is taking place in lower income countries and there is a pressing need to identify the particular ethical challenges arising in such contexts. In this paper, we draw upon the experiences of the MalariaGEN Consortium to identify specific ethical issues raised by such research in Africa, Asia and Oceania.DiscussionWe explore ethical issues (...)
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  6.  64
    Toward Methodological Innovation in Empirical Ethics Research.Michael Dunn, Mark Sheehan, Tony Hope & Michael Parker - 2012 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (4):466-480.
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  7.  56
    Seeking Consent to Genetic and Genomic Research in a Rural Ghanaian Setting: A Qualitative Study of the MalariaGEN Experience. [REVIEW]Paulina Tindana, Susan Bull, Lucas Amenga-Etego, Jantina de Vries, Raymond Aborigo, Kwadwo Koram, Dominic Kwiatkowski & Michael Parker - 2012 - BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):15-.
    Background: Seeking consent for genetic and genomic research can be challenging, particularly in populations with low literacy levels, and in emergency situations. All of these factors were relevant to the MalariaGEN study of genetic factors influencing immune responses to malaria in northern rural Ghana. This study sought to identify issues arising in practice during the enrolment of paediatric cases with severe malaria and matched healthy controls into the MalariaGEN study. Methods: The study used a rapid assessment incorporating multiple qualitative methods (...)
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  8.  53
    Symmetry Arguments Against Regular Probability: A Reply to Recent Objections.Matthew Parker - 2019 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 9 (1):1-21.
    A probability distribution is regular if it does not assign probability zero to any possible event. While some hold that probabilities should always be regular, three counter-arguments have been posed based on examples where, if regularity holds, then perfectly similar events must have different probabilities. Howson and Benci et al. have raised technical objections to these symmetry arguments, but we see here that their objections fail. Howson says that Williamson’s “isomorphic” events are not in fact isomorphic, but Howson is speaking (...)
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  9. Set Size and the Part–Whole Principle.Matthew W. Parker - 2013 - Review of Symbolic Logic (4):1-24.
    Recent work has defended “Euclidean” theories of set size, in which Cantor’s Principle (two sets have equally many elements if and only if there is a one-to-one correspondence between them) is abandoned in favor of the Part-Whole Principle (if A is a proper subset of B then A is smaller than B). It has also been suggested that Gödel’s argument for the unique correctness of Cantor’s Principle is inadequate. Here we see from simple examples, not that Euclidean theories of set (...)
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  10. Symmetry Arguments Against Regular Probability: A Reply to Recent Objections.Matthew Parker - 2018 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 9 (1):8.
    A probability distribution is regular if no possible event is assigned probability zero. While some hold that probabilities should always be regular, three counter-arguments have been posed based on examples where, if regularity holds, then perfectly similar events must have different probabilities. Howson (2017) and Benci et al. (2016) have raised technical objections to these symmetry arguments, but we see here that their objections fail. Howson says that Williamson’s (2007) “isomorphic” events are not in fact isomorphic, but Howson is speaking (...)
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  11. Working with Concepts: The Role of Community in International Collaborative Biomedical Research.V. M. Marsh, D. K. Kamuya, M. J. Parker & C. S. Molyneux - 2011 - Public Health Ethics 4 (1):26-39.
    The importance of communities in strengthening the ethics of international collaborative research is increasingly highlighted, but there has been much debate about the meaning of the term ‘community’ and its specific normative contribution. We argue that ‘community’ is a contingent concept that plays an important normative role in research through the existence of morally significant interplay between notions of community and individuality. We draw on experience of community engagement in rural Kenya to illustrate two aspects of this interplay: (i) that (...)
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  12.  14
    Doctors’ Perceptions of How Resource Limitations Relate to Futility in End-of-Life Decision Making: A Qualitative Analysis.Eliana Close, Ben P. White, Lindy Willmott, Cindy Gallois, Malcolm Parker, Nicholas Graves & Sarah Winch - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (6):373-379.
    ObjectiveTo increase knowledge of how doctors perceive futile treatments and scarcity of resources at the end of life. In particular, their perceptions about whether and how resource limitations influence end-of-life decision making. This study builds on previous work that found some doctors include resource limitations in their understanding of the concept of futility.SettingThree tertiary hospitals in metropolitan Brisbane, Australia.DesignQualitative study using in-depth, semistructured, face-to-face interviews. Ninety-six doctors were interviewed in 11 medical specialties. Transcripts of the interviews were analysed using thematic (...)
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  13.  76
    The Best Possible Child.M. Parker - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (5):279-283.
    Julian Savulescu argues for two principles of reproductive ethics: reproductive autonomy and procreative beneficence, where the principle of procreative beneficence is conceptualised in terms of a duty to have the child, of the possible children that could be had, who will have the best opportunity of the best life. Were it to be accepted, this principle would have significant implications for the ethics of reproductive choice and, in particular, for the use of prenatal testing and other reproductive technologies for the (...)
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  14.  28
    Community Engagement Strategies for Genomic Studies in Africa: A Review of the Literature. [REVIEW]Paulina Tindana, Jantina de Vries, Megan Campbell, Katherine Littler, Janet Seeley, Patricia Marshall, Jennifer Troyer, Morisola Ogundipe, Vincent Pius Alibu, Aminu Yakubu & Michael Parker - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):24.
    Community engagement has been recognised as an important aspect of the ethical conduct of biomedical research, especially when research is focused on ethnically or culturally distinct populations. While this is a generally accepted tenet of biomedical research, it is unclear what components are necessary for effective community engagement, particularly in the context of genomic research in Africa.
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  15.  51
    Forms of Benefit Sharing in Global Health Research Undertaken in Resource Poor Settings: A Qualitative Study of Stakeholders' Views in Kenya.Geoffrey Lairumbi, Michael Parker, Raymond Fitzpatrick & Michael English - 2012 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7:7.
    Background Increase in global health research undertaken in resource poor settings in the last decade though a positive development has raised ethical concerns relating to potential for exploitation. Some of the suggested strategies to address these concerns include calls for providing universal standards of care, reasonable availability of proven interventions and more recently, promoting the overall social value of research especially in clinical research. Promoting the social value of research has been closely associated with providing fair benefits to various stakeholders (...)
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  16.  8
    Patient and Public Involvement: Two Sides of the Same Coin or Different Coins Altogether?Matthew S. McCoy, Jonathan Warsh, Leah Rand, Michael Parker & Mark Sheehan - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (6):708-715.
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  17.  25
    Understandings of Genomic Research in Developing Countries: A Qualitative Study of the Views of MalariaGEN Participants in Mali.Karim Traore, Susan Bull, Alassane Niare, Salimata Konate, Mahamadou A. Thera, Dominic Kwiatkowski, Michael Parker & Ogobara K. Doumbo - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-10.
    BackgroundObtaining informed consent for participation in genomic research in low-income settings presents specific ethical issues requiring attention. These include the challenges that arise when providing information about unfamiliar and technical research methods, the implications of complicated infrastructure and data sharing requirements, and the potential consequences of future research with samples and data. This study investigated researchers’ and participants’ parents’ experiences of a consent process and understandings of a genome-wide association study of malaria involving children aged five and under in Mali. (...)
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  18.  59
    Consulting Communities on Feedback of Genetic Findings in International Health Research: Sharing Sickle Cell Disease and Carrier Information in Coastal Kenya. [REVIEW]Vicki Marsh, Francis Kombe, Raymond Fitzpatrick, Thomas N. Williams, Michael Parker & Sassy Molyneux - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):41.
    International health research in malaria-endemic settings may include screening for sickle cell disease, given the relationship between this important genetic condition and resistance to malaria, generating questions about whether and how findings should be disclosed. The literature on disclosing genetic findings in the context of research highlights the role of community consultation in understanding and balancing ethically important issues from participants’ perspectives, including social forms of benefit and harm, and the influence of access to care. To inform research practice locally, (...)
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  19.  27
    Motivations and Perceptions of Community Advisory Boards in the Ethics of Medical Research: The Case of the Thai-Myanmar Border.Khin Maung Lwin, Phaik Y. Cheah, Phaik K. Cheah, Nicholas J. White, Nicholas P. J. Day, Francois Nosten & Michael Parker - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):12.
    Community engagement is increasingly promoted as a marker of good, ethical practice in the context of international collaborative research in low-income countries. There is, however, no widely agreed definition of community engagement or of approaches adopted. Justifications given for its use also vary. Community engagement is, for example, variously seen to be of value in: the development of more effective and appropriate consent processes; improved understanding of the aims and forms of research; higher recruitment rates; the identification of important ethical (...)
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  20.  6
    Reasons Doctors Provide Futile Treatment at the End of Life: A Qualitative Study.Lindy Willmott, Benjamin White, Cindy Gallois, Malcolm Parker, Nicholas Graves, Sarah Winch, Leonie Kaye Callaway, Nicole Shepherd & Eliana Close - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (8):496-503.
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  21.  35
    The Cambridge Medical Ethics Workbook.Donna Dickenson, Richard Huxtable & Michael Parker (eds.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    This new edition of The Cambridge Medical Ethics Workbook builds on the success of the first edition by working from the 'bottom up', with a widely praised case ...
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  22.  12
    Motivations and Perceptions of Community Advisory Boards in the Ethics of Medical Research: The Case of the Thai-Myanmar Border.Michael Parker, Francois Nosten, Nicholas P. J. Day, Nicholas J. White, Phaik Kin Cheah, Phaik Yeong Cheah & Khin Maung Lwin - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1).
    BackgroundCommunity engagement is increasingly promoted as a marker of good, ethical practice in the context of international collaborative research in low-income countries. There is, however, no widely agreed definition of community engagement or of approaches adopted. Justifications given for its use also vary. Community engagement is, for example, variously seen to be of value in: the development of more effective and appropriate consent processes; improved understanding of the aims and forms of research; higher recruitment rates; the identification of important ethical (...)
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  23.  7
    Public Involvement in the Governance of Population-Level Biomedical Research: Unresolved Questions and Future Directions.Sonja Erikainen, Phoebe Friesen, Leah Rand, Karin Jongsma, Michael Dunn, Annie Sorbie, Matthew McCoy, Jessica Bell, Michael Burgess, Haidan Chen, Vicky Chico, Sarah Cunningham-Burley, Julie Darbyshire, Rebecca Dawson, Andrew Evans, Nick Fahy, Teresa Finlay, Lucy Frith, Aaron Goldenberg, Lisa Hinton, Nils Hoppe, Nigel Hughes, Barbara Koenig, Sapfo Lignou, Michelle McGowan, Michael Parker, Barbara Prainsack, Mahsa Shabani, Ciara Staunton, Rachel Thompson, Kinga Varnai, Effy Vayena, Oli Williams, Max Williamson, Sarah Chan & Mark Sheehan - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (7):522-525.
    Population-level biomedical research offers new opportunities to improve population health, but also raises new challenges to traditional systems of research governance and ethical oversight. Partly in response to these challenges, various models of public involvement in research are being introduced. Yet, the ways in which public involvement should meet governance challenges are not well understood. We conducted a qualitative study with 36 experts and stakeholders using the World Café method to identify key governance challenges and explore how public involvement can (...)
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  24.  13
    ‘It is an Entrustment’: Broad Consent for Genomic Research and Biobanks in Sub‐Saharan Africa.Paulina Tindana, Sassy Molyneux, Susan Bull & Michael Parker - 2017 - Developing World Bioethics.
    In recent years, there has been an increase in the establishment of biobanks for genetic and genomic studies around the globe. One example of this is the Human Heredity and Health in Africa Initiative, which has established biobanks in the sub-region to facilitate future indigenous genomic studies. The concept of ‘broad consent’ has been proposed as a mechanism to enable potential research participants in biobanks to give permission for their samples to be used in future research studies. However, questions remain (...)
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  25.  6
    Use of Broad Consent and Related Procedures in Genomics Research: Perspectives From Research Participants in the Genetics of Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHDGen) Study in a University Teaching Hospital in Zambia.Oliver Mweemba, John Musuku, Bongani M. Mayosi, Michael Parker, Rwamahe Rutakumwa, Janet Seeley, Paulina Tindana & Jantina De Vries - 2019 - Global Bioethics:1-16.
    The use of broad consent for genomics research raises important ethical questions for the conduct of genomics research, including relating to its acceptability to research participants and comprehension of difficult scientific concepts. To explore these and other challenges, we conducted a study using qualitative methods with participants enrolled in an H3Africa Rheumatic Heart Disease genomics study in Zambia to explore their views on broad consent, sample and data sharing and secondary use. In-depth interviews were conducted with RHDGen participants, study staff (...)
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  26.  31
    Ethics in Practice: The State of the Debate on Promoting the Social Value of Global Health Research in Resource Poor Settings Particularly Africa.Geoffrey M. Lairumbi, Michael Parker, Raymond Fitzpatrick & Michael C. English - 2011 - BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):22.
    BackgroundPromoting the social value of global health research undertaken in resource poor settings has become a key concern in global research ethics. The consideration for benefit sharing, which concerns the elucidation of what if anything, is owed to participants, their communities and host nations that take part in such research, and the obligations of researchers involved, is one of the main strategies used for promoting social value of research. In the last decade however, there has been intense debate within academic (...)
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  27.  13
    Key Ethical Concepts and Their Application to COVID-19 Research.Angus Dawson, Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Michael Parker, Maxwell J. Smith & Teck Chuan Voo - 2020 - Public Health Ethics 13 (2):127-132.
    During the WHO-GloPID COVID-19 Global Research and Innovation Forum meeting held in Geneva on the 11th and 12th of February 2020 a number of different ethical concepts were used. This paper briefly states what a number of these concepts mean and how they might be applied to discussions about research during the COVID-19 pandemic and related outbreaks. This paper does not seek to be exhaustive and other ethical concepts are, of course, relevant and important.
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  28.  31
    Ethical Issues in the Export, Storage and Reuse of Human Biological Samples in Biomedical Research: Perspectives of Key Stakeholders in Ghana and Kenya.Paulina Tindana, Catherine S. Molyneux, Susan Bull & Michael Parker - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):76.
    For many decades, access to human biological samples, such as cells, tissues, organs, blood, and sub-cellular materials such as DNA, for use in biomedical research, has been central in understanding the nature and transmission of diseases across the globe. However, the limitations of current ethical and regulatory frameworks in sub-Saharan Africa to govern the collection, export, storage and reuse of these samples have resulted in inconsistencies in practice and a number of ethical concerns for sample donors, researchers and research ethics (...)
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  29. The Ethics of Open Access Publishing.Michael Parker - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):16.
    Should those who work on ethics welcome or resist moves to open access publishing? This paper analyses arguments in favour and against the increasing requirement for open access publishing and considers their implications for bioethics research. In the context of biomedical science, major funders are increasingly mandating open access as a condition of funding and such moves are also common in other disciplines. Whilst there has been some debate about the implications of open-access for the social sciences and humanities, there (...)
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  30. Three Concepts of Decidability for General Subsets of Uncountable Spaces.Matthew W. Parker - 2003 - Theoretical Computer Science 351 (1):2-13.
    There is no uniquely standard concept of an effectively decidable set of real numbers or real n-tuples. Here we consider three notions: decidability up to measure zero [M.W. Parker, Undecidability in Rn: Riddled basins, the KAM tori, and the stability of the solar system, Phil. Sci. 70(2) (2003) 359–382], which we abbreviate d.m.z.; recursive approximability [or r.a.; K.-I. Ko, Complexity Theory of Real Functions, Birkhäuser, Boston, 1991]; and decidability ignoring boundaries [d.i.b.; W.C. Myrvold, The decision problem for entanglement, in: R.S. (...)
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  31.  22
    Resisting Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases: Dilemmas in the Mass Treatment of Schistosomiasis and Soil-Transmitted Helminths in North-West Uganda.Melissa Parker, Tim Allen & Julie Hastings - 2008 - Journal of Biosocial Science 40 (2):161-181.
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  32.  36
    Consent and Assent in Paediatric Research in Low-Income Settings.Phaik Y. Cheah & Michael Parker - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):22.
    In order to involve children in the decision-making process about participation in medical research it is widely recommended that the child’s assent be sought in addition to parental consent. However, the concept of assent is fraught with difficulties, resulting in confusion among researchers and ethics committees alike.
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  33.  7
    Misconceiving “Neutrality” in Bioethics: Rejoinder to “Bioethics and the Myth of Neutrality”.Malcolm Parker - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (2):147-151.
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  34. Ethics in Collaborative Global Health Research Networks.M. Parker & S. Bull - 2009 - Clinical Ethics 4 (4):165-168.
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  35.  15
    Use of Broad Consent and Related Procedures in Genomics Research: Perspectives From Research Participants in the Genetics of Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHDGen) Study in a University Teaching Hospital in Zambia.Oliver Mweemba, John Musuku, Bongani M. Mayosi, Michael Parker, Rwamahe Rutakumwa, Janet Seeley, Paulina Tindana & Jantina De Vries - forthcoming - Tandf: Global Bioethics:1-16.
  36.  4
    Authority and the Future of Consent in Population-Level Biomedical Research.Mark Sheehan, Rachel Thompson, Jon Fistein, Jim Davies, Michael Dunn, Michael Parker, Julian Savulescu & Kerrie Woods - forthcoming - Public Health Ethics.
    Population-level biomedical research has become crucial to the health system’s ability to improve the health of the population. This form of research raises a number of well-documented ethical concerns, perhaps the most significant of which is the inability of the researcher to obtain fully informed specific consent from participants. Two proposed technical solutions to this problem of consent in large-scale biomedical research that have become increasingly popular are meta-consent and dynamic consent. We critically examine the ethical and practical credentials of (...)
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  37.  7
    “When They See Us, It’s Like They Have Seen the Benefits!”: Experiences of Study Benefits Negotiations in Community-Based Studies on the Kenyan Coast.Dorcas M. Kamuya, Vicki Marsh, Patricia Njuguna, Patrick Munywoki, Michael Parker & Sassy Molyneux - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):90.
    Benefit sharing in health research has been the focus of international debates for many years, particularly in developing countries. Whilst increasing attention is being given to frameworks that can guide researchers to determine levels of benefits to participants, there is little empirical research from developing countries on the practical application of these frameworks, including in situations of extreme poverty and vulnerability. In addition, the voices of those who often negotiate and face issues related to benefits in practice - frontline researchers (...)
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  38.  21
    Comparative Infinite Lottery Logic.Matthew W. Parker - 2020 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 84:28-36.
    As an application of his Material Theory of Induction, Norton (2018; manuscript) argues that the correct inductive logic for a fair infinite lottery, and also for evaluating eternal inflation multiverse models, is radically different from standard probability theory. This is due to a requirement of label independence. It follows, Norton argues, that finite additivity fails, and any two sets of outcomes with the same cardinality and co-cardinality have the same chance. This makes the logic useless for evaluating multiverse models based (...)
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  39.  64
    Tailored Medicine: Whom Will It Fit? The Ethics of Patient and Disease Stratification.Andrew Smart, Paul Martin & Michael Parker - 2004 - Bioethics 18 (4):322–343.
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  40.  5
    Informed Consent in Genomic Research and Biobanking: Taking Feedback of Findings Seriously.Paulina Tindana, Cornelius Depuur, Jantina de Vries, Janet Seeley & Michael Parker - 2020 - Global Bioethics 31 (1):200-215.
    Genomic research and biobanking present several ethical, social and cultural challenges, particularly when conducted in settings with limited scientific research capacity. One of these challenges is determining the model of consent that should support the sharing of human biological samples and data in the context of international collaborative research. In this paper, we report on the views of key research stakeholders in Ghana on what should count as good ethical practice when seeking consent for genomic research and biobanking in Africa. (...)
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  41.  27
    Law as Clinical Evidence: A New ConstitutiveModel of Medical Education and Decision-Making.Malcolm Parker, Lindy Willmott, Ben White, Gail Williams & Colleen Cartwright - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (1):101-109.
    Over several decades, ethics and law have been applied to medical education and practice in a way that reflects the continuation during the twentieth century of the strong distinction between facts and values. We explain the development of applied ethics and applied medical law and report selected results that reflect this applied model from an empirical project examining doctors’ decisions on withdrawing/withholding treatment from patients who lack decision-making capacity. The model is critiqued, and an alternative “constitutive” model is supported on (...)
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  42.  9
    What Constitutes Good Ethical Practice in Genomic Research in Africa? Perspectives of Participants in a Genomic Research Study in Uganda.Rwamahe Rutakumwa, Jantina de Vries, Michael Parker, Paulina Tindana, Oliver Mweemba & Janet Seeley - forthcoming - Tandf: Global Bioethics:1-15.
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  43.  45
    Two Concepts of Empirical Ethics.Malcolm Parker - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (4):202-213.
    The turn to empirical ethics answers two calls. The first is for a richer account of morality than that afforded by bioethical principlism, which is cast as excessively abstract and thin on the facts. The second is for the facts in question to be those of human experience and not some other, unworldly realm. Empirical ethics therefore promises a richer naturalistic ethics, but in fulfilling the second call it often fails to heed the metaethical requirements related to the first. Empirical (...)
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  44.  12
    Will Mass Drug Administration Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis? Evidence From Northern Coastal Tanzania.Melissa Parker & Tim Allen - 2013 - Journal of Biosocial Science 45 (4):517-545.
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  45.  9
    Use of Broad Consent and Related Procedures in Genomics Research: Perspectives From Research Participants in the Genetics of Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHDGen) Study in a University Teaching Hospital in Zambia.Jantina De Vries, Paulina Tindana, Janet Seeley, Rwamahe Rutakumwa, Michael Parker, Bongani M. Mayosi, John Musuku & Oliver Mweemba - 2020 - Global Bioethics 31 (1):184-199.
    ABSTRACT The use of broad consent for genomics research raises important ethical questions for the conduct of genomics research, including relating to its acceptability to research participants and comprehension of difficult scientific concepts. To explore these and other challenges, we conducted a study using qualitative methods with participants enrolled in an H3Africa Rheumatic Heart Disease genomics study in Zambia to explore their views on broad consent, sample and data sharing and secondary use. In-depth interviews were conducted with RHDGen participants, study (...)
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  46.  4
    Public’s Attitudes on Participation in a Biobank for Research: An Italian Survey.Corinna Porteri, Patrizio Pasqualetti, Elena Togni & Michael Parker - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):81.
    The creation of biobanks depends upon people’s willingness to donate their samples for research purposes and to agree to sample storage. Moreover, biobanks are a public good that requires active participation by all interested stakeholders at every stage of development. Therefore, knowing public’s attitudes towards participation in a biobank and biobank management is important and deserves investigation.
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  47.  2
    Informed Consent in Genomic Research and Biobanking: Taking Feedback of Findings Seriously.Paulina Tindana, Cornelius Depuur, Jantina de Vries, Janet Seeley & Michael Parker - forthcoming - Tandf: Global Bioethics:1-16.
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  48.  25
    Ethical Challenges That Arise at the Community Interface of Health R Esearch: Village R Eporters’ Experiences in Western K Enya.Tracey Chantler, Faith Otewa, Peter Onyango, Ben Okoth, Frank Odhiambo, Michael Parker & Paul Wenzel Geissler - 2013 - Developing World Bioethics 13 (1):30-37.
    Community Engagement (CE) has been presented by bio-ethicists and scientists as a straightforward and unequivocal good which can minimize the risks of exploitation and ensure a fair distribution of research benefits in developing countries. By means of ethnographic fieldwork undertaken in Kenya between 2007 and 2009 we explored how CE is understood and enacted in paediatric vaccine trials conducted by the Kenyan Medical Research Institute and the US Centers for Disease Control (KEMRI/CDC). In this paper we focus on the role (...)
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  49.  37
    Research Ethics: An Investigation of Patients’ Motivations for Their Participation in Genetics-Related Research.N. Hallowell, S. Cooke, G. Crawford, A. Lucassen & M. Parker - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (1):37-45.
    Design: Qualitative interview study. Participants: Fifty-nine patients with a family history of cancer who attend a regional cancer genetics clinic in the UK were interviewed about their current and previous research experiences. Findings: Interviewees gave a range of explanations for research participation. These were categorised as social—research participation benefits the wider society by progressing science and improving treatment for everyone; familial—research participation may improve healthcare and benefit current or future generations of the participant’s family; and personal—research participation provides therapeutic or (...)
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    Wie hilfreich sind „ethische Richtlinien“ am Einzelfall?Are “Ethics Guidelines” helpful in taking critical treatment decisions?Sandra Bartels, Mike Parker, Tony Hope & Stella Reiter-Theil - 2005 - Ethik in der Medizin 17 (3):191-205.
    ZusammenfassungEntscheidungen der Therapiebegrenzung und in der Betreuung am Lebensende sind häufig komplex und von ethischen Problemen begleitet. Im Mittelpunkt der Untersuchung steht die entscheidende Frage, wie hilfreich existierende „Ethik-Richtlinien“, die eine ethische Orientierung bei solchen Entscheidungen geben sollen, in der klinischen Praxis tatsächlich sind. Die Frage, welchen Nutzen „Ethik-Richtlinien“ bei der Entscheidungsfindung haben oder haben können, wird hier exemplarisch an einem klinischen Fallbeispiel aus einer Ethik-Kooperationsstudie in der Intensivmedizin analysiert. Vergleichend werden hierzu „Ethik-Richtlinien“ aus Deutschland, der Schweiz und aus Großbritannien (...)
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