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  1.  4
    Counselling Variation Among Physicians Regarding Intestinal Transplant for Short Bowel Syndrome.C. L. Cummings, K. A. Diefenbach & M. R. Mercurio - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (10):665-670.
    Background Intestinal transplant in infants with severe short bowel syndrome (SBS) is an emerging therapy, yet without sufficient long-term data or established guidelines, resulting in possible variation in practice. Objectives To assess current attitudes and counselling practices among physicians regarding intestinal transplant in infants with SBS, and to determine whether counselling and management vary between subspecialists or centres. Methods A national sample of practicing paediatric surgeons and neonatologists was surveyed via the American Academy of Paediatrics listserves. Results were analysed by (...)
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  2.  11
    Parental Refusal of Transfusion on Religious Grounds: An Exception to the Standard Approach.M. R. Mercurio - 2007 - Clinical Ethics 2 (3):146-148.
    The standard approach to parental refusal of transfusion on religious grounds in many newborn intensive care units and paediatric services is to override the refusal and provide the transfusion, usually with court intervention if time allows. This approach is justified by the child's right to effective treatment, seen to outweigh the parents' right to religious freedom and their right to decide for their child. That justification, however, may be limited by the predicted effectiveness of the transfusion (or any proposed treatment) (...)
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    An Analysis of Candidate Ethical Justifications for Allowing Inexperienced Physicians-in-Training to Perform Invasive Procedures.M. R. Mercurio - 2008 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (1):44-57.
    Allowing relatively inexperienced physicians-in-training to perform invasive medical procedures is a widely accepted practice, generally felt to be justified by the need to train future generations of physicians. The ethical justification of this practice, however, is rarely if ever explored in any depth. This essay examines the moral issues associated with this practice, in the setting of a specific clinical scenario involving the emergency intubation of a critically ill newborn. The practice is ultimately shown to be justified based not only (...)
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