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  1.  17
    Institutional Antecedents of Partnering for Social Change: How Institutional Logics Shape Cross-Sector Social Partnerships.Clodia Vurro, M. Tina Dacin & Francesco Perrini - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (S1):39-53.
    Heeding the call for a deeper understanding of how cross-sector social partnerships can be managed across different contexts, this article integrates ideas from institutional theory with current debate on cross-boundary collaboration. Adopting the point of view of business actors interested in forming a CSSP to address complex social problems, we suggest that “appropriateness” needs shape business approaches toward partnering for social change, exerting an impact on the benefits that can be gained from it. A theoretical framework is proposed that identifies (...)
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  2.  41
    Business Versus Ethics? Thoughts on the Future of Business Ethics.M. Tina Dacin, Jeffrey S. Harrison, David Hess, Sheila Killian & Julia Roloff - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 180 (3):863-877.
    To commemorate 40 years since the founding of the Journal of Business Ethics, the editors in chief of the journal have invited the editors to provide commentaries on the future of business ethics. This essay comprises a selection of commentaries aimed at creating dialogue around the theme Business versus Ethics?. The authors of these commentaries seek to transcend the age-old separation fallacy :409–421, 1994) that juxtaposes business and ethics/society, posing a forced choice or trade off. Providing a contemporary take on (...)
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  3.  6
    Psychological Pathways to Fraud: Understanding and Preventing Fraud in Organizations. [REVIEW]Pamela R. Murphy & M. Tina Dacin - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (4):601-618.
    In response to calls for more research on how to prevent or detect fraud (ACAP, Final Report of the Advisory Committee on the Auditing Profession, United States Department of the Treasury, Washington, DC, 2008 ; AICPA, SAS No. 99: Consideration of Fraud in a Financial Statement Audit, New York, NY, 2002 ; Carcello et al., Working Paper, University of Tennessee, Bentley University and Kennesaw State University, 2008 ; Wells, Journal of Accountancy, 2004 ), we develop a framework that identifies three (...)
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  4.  10
    Institutional Antecedents of Partnering for Social Change: How Institutional Logics Shape Cross—Sector Social Partnerships. [REVIEW]Clodia Vurro, M. Tina Dacin & Francesco Perrini - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1):39-53.
    Heeding the call for a deeper understanding of how cross-sector social partnerships can be managed across different contexts, this article integrates ideas from institutional theory with current debate on cross-boundary collaboration. Adopting the point of view of business actors interested in forming a CSSP to address complex social problems, we suggest that "appropriateness" needs shape business approaches toward partnering for social change, exerting an impact on the benefits that can be gained from it. A theoretical framework is proposed that identifies (...)
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  5.  8
    Collective Social Entrepreneurship: Collaboratively Shaping Social Good. [REVIEW]A. Wren Montgomery, Peter A. Dacin & M. Tina Dacin - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (3):375-388.
    In this paper, we move beyond the typical focus on the role of individuals in leading social change to examine "collective social entrepreneurship", the role multiple actors collaboratively play to address social problems, create new institutions, and dismantle outdated institutional arrangements. Specifically, we examine collective social entrepreneurship across a diverse range of collaborative activities including movements, alliances and markets for social good. We identify resource utilization approaches and three associated sets of activities that illustrate the work of collective social entrepreneurs—framing, (...)
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