16 found
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  1.  13
    Personal Utility in Genomic Testing: Is There Such a Thing?Eline M. Bunnik, A. Cecile J. W. Janssens & Maartje H. N. Schermer - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (4):322-326.
  2.  43
    Imagining Moral Bioenhancement Practices: Drawing Inspiration From Moral Education, Public Health Ethics, and Forensic Psychiatry.Jona Specker & Maartje H. N. Schermer - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (3):415-426.
    :In this article, we consider contexts or domains in which moral bioenhancement interventions possibly or most likely will be implemented. By looking closely at similar or related existing practices and their relevant ethical frameworks, we hope to identify ethical considerations that are relevant for evaluating potential moral bioenhancement interventions. We examine, first, debates on the proper scope of moral education; second, proposals for identifying early risk factors for antisocial behaviour; and third, the difficult balancing of individual freedom and third party (...)
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  3.  20
    Recent Insights Into Decision-Making and Their Implications for Informed Consent.Irene M. L. Vos, Maartje H. N. Schermer & Ineke L. L. E. Bolt - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (11):734-738.
    Research from behavioural sciences shows that people reach decisions in a much less rational and well-considered way than was often assumed. The doctrine of informed consent, which is an important ethical principle and legal requirement in medical practice, is being challenged by these insights into decision-making and real-world choice behaviour. This article discusses the implications of recent insights of research on decision-making behaviour for the informed consent doctrine. It concludes that there is a significant tension between the often non-rational choice (...)
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  4.  28
    Public Attitudes Towards Moral Enhancement. Evidence That Means Matter Morally.Jona Specker, Maartje H. N. Schermer & Peter B. Reiner - 2017 - Neuroethics 10 (3):405-417.
    To gain insight into the reasons that the public may have for endorsing or eschewing pharmacological moral enhancement for themselves or for others, we used empirical tools to explore public attitudes towards these issues. Participants from the United States were recruited via Amazon’s Mechanical Turk and were randomly assigned to read one of several contrastive vignettes in which a 13-year-old child is described as bullying another student in school and then is offered an empathy-enhancing program. The empathy-enhancing program is described (...)
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  5.  53
    Informed Consent in Direct-to-Consumer Personal Genome Testing: The Outline of A Model Between Specific and Generic Consent.Eline M. Bunnik, A. Cecile J. W. Janssens & Maartje H. N. Schermer - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (3):343-351.
    Broad genome-wide testing is increasingly finding its way to the public through the online direct-to-consumer marketing of so-called personal genome tests. Personal genome tests estimate genetic susceptibilities to multiple diseases and other phenotypic traits simultaneously. Providers commonly make use of Terms of Service agreements rather than informed consent procedures. However, to protect consumers from the potential physical, psychological and social harms associated with personal genome testing and to promote autonomous decision-making with regard to the testing offer, we argue that current (...)
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  6.  12
    Embodiment in Neuro-Engineering Endeavors: Phenomenological Considerations and Practical Implications.Sadaf Soloukey Tbalvandany, Biswadjiet Sanjay Harhangi, Awee W. Prins & Maartje H. N. Schermer - 2019 - Neuroethics 12 (3):231-242.
    The field of Neuro-Engineering seems to be on the fast track towards accomplishing its ultimate goal of potentially replacing the nervous system in the face of disease. Meanwhile, the patients and professionals involved are continuously dealing with human bodily experience and especially how neuro-engineering devices could become part of a user’s body schema: the domain of ‘embodied phenomenology’. This focus on embodiment, however, is not sufficiently reflected in the current literature on ethical and philosophical issues in neuro-engineering. In this article (...)
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  7.  13
    Omnipresent Health Checks May Result in Over-Responsibilization.Yrrah H. Stol, Maartje H. N. Schermer & Eva C. A. Asscher - 2017 - Public Health Ethics 10 (1).
    Health checks identify disease in individuals without a medical indication. More and more checks are offered by more providers on more risk factors and diseases, so we may speak of an omnipresence of health checks. Current ethical evaluation of health checks considers checks on an individual basis only. However, omnipresent checks have effects over and above the effects of individual health checks. They might give the impression that health is entirely manageable by individual actions and strengthen the norm of individual (...)
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  8.  2
    Informed Consent in Direct-to-Consumer Personal Genome Testing: The Outline of A Model Between Specific and Generic Consent.Eline M. Bunnik, A. Cecile J. W. Janssens & Maartje H. N. Schermer - 2014 - Bioethics 28 (7):343-351.
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  9.  2
    Embodiment in Neuro-engineering Endeavors: Phenomenological Considerations and Practical Implications.Sadaf Soloukey Tbalvandany, Biswadjiet Sanjay Harhangi, Awee W. Prins & Maartje H. N. Schermer - 2019 - Neuroethics 12 (3):231-242.
    The field of Neuro-Engineering seems to be on the fast track towards accomplishing its ultimate goal of potentially replacing the nervous system in the face of disease. Meanwhile, the patients and professionals involved are continuously dealing with human bodily experience and especially how neuro-engineering devices could become part of a user’s body schema: the domain of ‘embodied phenomenology’. This focus on embodiment, however, is not sufficiently reflected in the current literature on ethical and philosophical issues in neuro-engineering. In this article (...)
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  10.  10
    Forensic Practitioners’ Views on Stimulating Moral Development and Moral Growth in Forensic Psychiatric Care.Jona Specker, Farah Focquaert, Sigrid Sterckx & Maartje H. N. Schermer - 2020 - Neuroethics 13 (1):73-85.
    In the context of debates on psychiatry issues pertaining to moral dimensions of psychiatric health care are frequently discussed. These debates invite reflection on the question whether forensic practitioners have a role in stimulating patients’ moral development and moral growth in the context of forensic psychiatric and psychological treatment and care. We conducted a qualitative study to examine to what extent forensic practitioners consider moral development and moral growth to be a part of their current professional practices and to what (...)
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  11.  36
    What is a good health check? An interview study of health check providers’ views and practices.Yrrah H. Stol, Eva C. A. Asscher & Maartje H. N. Schermer - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):55.
    Health checks identify disease in people without symptoms. They may be offered by the government through population screenings and by other providers to individual users as ‘personal health checks’. Health check providers’ perspective of ‘good’ health checks may further the debate on the ethical evaluation and possible regulation of these personal health checks. In 2015, we interviewed twenty Dutch health check providers on criteria for ‘good’ health checks, and the role these criteria play in their practices. Providers unanimously formulate a (...)
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  12.  16
    Ideals Regarding a Good Life for Nursing Home Residents with Dementia: Views of Professional Caregivers.Annemarie Kalis, Maartje H. N. Schermer & Johannes J. M. van Delden - 2005 - Nursing Ethics 12 (1):30-42.
    This study investigates what professional caregivers working in nursing homes consider to be a good life for residents suffering from dementia. Ten caregivers were interviewed; special attention was paid to the way in which they deal with conflicting values. Transcripts of the interviews were analysed qualitatively according to the method of grounded theory. The results were compared with those from a similar, earlier study on ideals found in mission statements of nursing homes. The concepts that were mentioned by most interviewed (...)
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  13.  29
    Personal Genome Testing: Test Characteristics to Clarify the Discourse on Ethical, Legal and Societal Issues.Eline M. Bunnik, Maartje H. N. Schermer & A. Cecile J. W. Janssens - 2011 - BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):11.
    Background: As genetics technology proceeds, practices of genetic testing have become more heterogeneous: many different types of tests are finding their way to the public in different settings and for a variety of purposes. This diversification is relevant to the discourse on ethical, legal and societal issues (ELSI) surrounding genetic testing, which must evolve to encompass these differences. One important development is the rise of personal genome testing on the basis of genetic profiling: the testing of multiple genetic variants simultaneously (...)
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  14.  13
    On the Personal Utility of Alzheimer’s Disease-Related Biomarker Testing in the Research Context.Eline M. Bunnik, Edo Richard, Richard Milne & Maartje H. N. Schermer - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (12):830-834.
    Many healthy volunteers choose to take part in Alzheimer’s disease prevention studies because they want to know whether they will develop dementia—and what they can do to reduce their risk—and are therefore interested in learning the results of AD biomarker tests. Proponents of AD biomarker disclosure often refer to the personal utility of AD biomarkers, claiming that research participants will be able to use AD biomarker information for personal purposes, such as planning ahead or making important life decisions. In this (...)
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  15.  8
    Good Health Checks According to the General Public; Expectations and Criteria: A Focus Group Study.Yrrah H. Stol, Eva C. A. Asscher & Maartje H. N. Schermer - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):64.
    Health checks or health screenings identify disease in people without a specific medical indication. So far, the perspective of health check users has remained underexposed in discussions about the ethics and regulation of health checks. In 2017, we conducted a qualitative study with lay people from the Netherlands. We asked what participants consider characteristics of good and bad health checks, and whether they saw a role for the Dutch government. Participants consider a good predictive value the most important characteristic of (...)
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  16.  21
    Reasons to Participate or Not to Participate in Cardiovascular Health Checks: A Review of the Literature: Table 1. [REVIEW]Yrrah H. Stol, Eva C. A. Asscher & Maartje H. N. Schermer - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (3):301-311.
    Cardiovascular health checks test risk factors for cardiovascular disease. They are offered to improve health: in case of an increased risk, participants receive lifestyle advice and medication. With this review, we investigate what is known about the reasons why people do or do not test for CVD risk factors. To what extent do these reasons relate to health monitoring and/or improvement? And do reasons differ in different contexts in which health checks are offered? We conducted a literature search and included (...)
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