Results for 'MacAllister James'

983 found
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  1.  34
    Taking flight: trust, ethics and the comfort of strangers.Anne Pirrie, James MacAllister & Gale Macleod - 2012 - Ethics and Education 7 (1):33 - 44.
    This article explores the themes of trust and ethical conduct in social research, with particular attention to the trust that can develop between the members of a research team as well as between researchers and the researched. The authors draw upon a three-year empirical study of destinations and outcomes for young people excluded from alternative educational provision. They also make reference to a contemporary exposition of Aristotle's writing on friendship in order to explore two sets of relevant distinctions that have (...)
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  2.  91
    Virtue Epistemology and the Philosophy of Education.James Macallister - 2012 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (2):251-270.
    This article initially provides a brief overview of virtue epistemology; it thereafter considers some possible ramifications of this branch of the theory of knowledge for the philosophy of education. The main features of three different manifestations of virtue epistemology are first explained. Importantly, it is then maintained that developments in virtue epistemology may offer the resources to critique aspects of the debate between Hirst and Carr about how the philosophy of education ought to be carried out and by whom. Wilfred (...)
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  3.  32
    MacIntyre's Revolutionary Aristotelian Philosophy and his Idea of an Educated Public Revisited.James Macallister - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (4):524-537.
    In this article I revisit MacIntyre's lecture on the idea of an educated public. I argue that the full significance of MacIntyre's views on the underlying purposes of universities only become clear when his lecture on the educated public is situated in the context of his wider ‘revolutionary Aristotelian’ philosophical project. I claim that for MacIntyre educational institutions should both support students to learn how to think for themselves and act for the common good. After considering criticisms from Putnam, Wain (...)
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  4.  6
    Moral Learning through Tragedy in Aristotle and Force Majeure.James MacAllister - 2023 - The Journal of Aesthetic Education 57 (1):1-18.
    Abstract:In this article, I challenge Simon Critchley’s recent suggestion that tragic art is not morally educational in Aristotle’s analysis and instead argue that it can be inferred from Aristotle that tragic art can morally educate in three main ways: via emotion education, by helping the audience come to understand what matters in life, and by depicting conduct worthy of moral emulation and conduct that is not. Stephen Halliwell’s reading of how catharsis helps the audience of tragedy learn to feel pity (...)
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  5.  5
    Moral Learning through Tragedy in Aristotle and Force Majeure.James MacAllister - 2023 - The Journal of Aesthetic Education 57 (1):1-18.
    In this article, I challenge Simon Critchley's recent suggestion that tragic art is not morally educational in Aristotle's analysis and instead argue that it can be inferred from Aristotle that tragic art can morally educate in three main ways: via emotion education, by helping the audience come to understand what matters in life, and by depicting conduct worthy of moral emulation and conduct that is not. Stephen Halliwell's reading of how catharsis helps the audience of tragedy learn to feel pity (...)
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  6.  48
    The ‘Physically Educated’ Person: Physical education in the philosophy of Reid, Peters and Aristotle.James MacAllister - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (9):908-920.
    This article will derive a definition and account of the physically educated person, through an examination of the philosophy of Andrew Reid, Richard Peters and Aristotle. Initially, Reid’s interpretation of Peters’ views about the educational significance of practical knowledge (and physical education) will be considered. While it will be acknowledged that Peters was rather disparaging about the educational merit of some practical activities in Ethics and Education, it will be argued that he elsewhere suggests that such practical activities could be (...)
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  7.  30
    School Discipline, Educational Interest and Pupil Wisdom☆.James MacAllister - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (1):20-35.
    In this article, the concept of school discipline will be explored in relation to that of educational interest. Initially, Clark’s account of two different kinds of school order (discipline and control) will be explained. The interest-based theory of school discipline advanced by Pat Wilson will thereafter be analysed. It will be argued that both these scholars persuasively explain how school discipline may follow when learning activities are successfully married to pupil interests and experiences. However, it will be maintained that the (...)
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  8.  23
    Searching for excellence in education: knowledge, virtue and presence?James MacAllister, Gale Macleod & Anne Pirrie - 2013 - Ethics and Education 8 (2):153-165.
    This article addresses two main questions: what is excellence and should epistemic excellence be the main purpose of education? Though references to excellence have become increasingly frequent in the UK education policy, these questions are perhaps especially important in Scotland where the curriculum is explicitly for excellence. Following Hirst and Peters, it is hypothesised that if the term ‘education’ implies possession of a certain breadth of general knowledge and understanding, then the term ‘excellence’ may imply a deep grasp of a (...)
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  9.  14
    On the potential in film for ethics education: in defence of educational ethicism.James MacAllister - 2023 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (1):257-275.
    In this paper the potential in film for ethics education is considered, and the theory of educational ethicism is defended. Some key features of ethicism are firstly outlined. Bery’s Gaut’s argument about how artworks may teach ethics in an aesthetically meritorious way is also discussed. Two objections (from Matthew Kieran and Andrea Sauchelli) to Gaut’s position are then considered. It is argued that Gaut’s ethicism is not well placed to overcome these objections. However, I draw upon Paul Hirst to explain (...)
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  10.  26
    Education for Personal Life: John MacMurray on Why Learning to be Human Requires Emotional Discipline.James MacAllister - 2014 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (1):118-136.
    In this article I discuss the philosophy of John MacMurray, and in particular, his little-examined writings on discipline and emotion education. It is argued that discipline is a vital element in the emotion education MacMurray thought central to learning to be human, because for him it takes concerted effort to overcome the human tendency toward egocentricity. It is maintained that MacMurray's philosophy of education is of contemporary significance for at least two reasons. On the one hand it suggests an alternative (...)
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  11.  27
    What should Educational Institutions be for?James MacAllister - 2016 - British Journal of Educational Studies 64 (3):375-391.
  12.  27
    Aesthetics, Nature and Religion: Ronald W. Hepburn and his Legacy, ed. Endre Szécsényi.Endre Szécsényi, Peter Cheyne, Cairns Craig, David E. Cooper, Emily Brady, Douglas Hedley, Mary Warnock, Guy Bennett-Hunter, Michael McGhee, James Kirwan, Isis Brook, Fran Speed, Yuriko Saito, James MacAllister, Arto Haapala, Alexander J. B. Hampton, Pauline von Bonsdorff, Sigurjón Baldur Hafsteinsson & Arnar Árnason - 2020 - Aberdeen: Aberdeen University Press.
    On 18–19 May 2018, a symposium was held in the Research Institute of Irish and Scottish Studies at the University of Aberdeen to commemorate the tenth anniversary of the death of Ronald W. Hepburn (1927–2008). The speakers at this event discussed Hepburn’s oeuvre from several perspectives. For this book, the collection of the revised versions of their talks has been supplemented by the papers of other scholars who were unable to attend the symposium itself. Thus this volume contains contributions from (...)
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  13. S igns of Spenglerian decline are everywhere. 1 The bottom has.James Koehne - 2004 - In Christopher Washburne & Maiken Derno (eds.), Bad music: the music we love to hate. New York: Routledge. pp. 148.
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  14.  10
    The flight from banality.James Koehne - 2004 - In Christopher Washburne & Maiken Derno (eds.), Bad music: the music we love to hate. New York: Routledge. pp. 148.
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  15.  13
    How (not) to be secular: reading Charles Taylor.James K. A. Smith - 2014 - Grand Rapids, Michigan: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company.
    How (Not) to Be Secular is what Jamie Smith calls "your hitchhiker's guide to the present" -- it is both a reading guide to Charles Taylor's monumental work A Secular Age and philosophical guidance on how we might learn to live in our times. Taylor's landmark book A Secular Age (2007) provides a monumental, incisive analysis of what it means to live in the post-Christian present -- a pluralist world of competing beliefs and growing unbelief. Jamie Smith's book is a (...)
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  16. Pragmatism.William James - 1907 - New York [etc.]: Longmans, Green and co.. Edited by William James & Doris Olin.
    Noted psychologist and philosopher develops his own brand of pragmatism, based on theories of C. S. Peirce. Emphasis on "radical empiricism," versus the transcendental and rationalist tradition. One of the most important books in American philosophy. Note.
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  17.  81
    The elements of moral philosophy.James Rachels & Stuart Rachels - 2015 - [Dubuque]: McGraw-Hill Education. Edited by James Rachels.
    Moral philosophy is the study of what morality is and what it requires of us. As Socrates said, it's about "how we ought to live"-and why. It would be helpful if we could begin with a simple, uncontroversial definition of what morality is. Unfortunately, we cannot. There are many rival theories, each expounding a different conception of what it means to live morally, and any definition that goes beyond Socrates's simple formula-tion is bound to offend at least one of them. (...)
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  18. Just doing what I do: on the awareness of fluent agency.James M. Dow - 2017 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 16 (1):155-177.
    Hubert Dreyfus has argued that cases of absorbed bodily coping show that there is no room for self-awareness in flow experiences of experts. In this paper, I argue against Dreyfus’ maxim of vanishing self-awareness by suggesting that awareness of agency is present in expert bodily action. First, I discuss the phenomenon of absorbed bodily coping by discussing flow experiences involved in expert bodily action: merging into the flow; immersion in the flow; emergence out of flow. I argue against the claim (...)
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  19.  31
    Objectivity Socialized.James Pearson - 2022 - In Sean Morris (ed.), The Philosophical Project of Carnap and Quine. New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press. pp. 92-113.
    Do Quine and Carnap distort the social nature of inquiry by privileging individual epistemic subjects? This objection is at the heart of Donald Davidson’s claim that Quine fails to grasp the significance of the concept of truth. In Carnap’s case, the objection may be detected in Charles Morris’s call to ground scientific philosophy in semiotics, the science of signs, rather than syntax, the formal investigation of languages. Drawing out the challenge from Morris’s proposal requires examining a neglected influence on this (...)
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  20. The Principles of Psychology.William James - 1890 - London, England: Dover Publications.
  21. The Will to Believe: And Other Essays in Popular Philosophy.William James - 1979 - New York: Cambridge University Press. Edited by Frederick Burkhardt, Fredson Bowers & Ignas K. Skrupskelis.
    For this 1897 publication, the American philosopher William James brought together ten essays, some of which were originally talks given to Ivy League societies. Accessible to a broader audience, these non-technical essays illustrate the author's pragmatic approach to belief and morality, arguing for faith and action in spite of uncertainty. James thought his audiences suffered 'paralysis of their native capacity for faith' while awaiting scientific grounds for belief. His response consisted in an attitude of 'radical empiricism', which deals (...)
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  22. The Principles of Psychology.William James - 1890 - Les Etudes Philosophiques 11 (3):506-507.
     
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  23. I—James Ladyman: On the Identity and Diversity of Objects in a Structure.James Ladyman - 2007 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 81 (1):23-43.
    The identity and diversity of individual objects may be grounded or ungrounded, and intrinsic or contextual. Intrinsic individuation can be grounded in haecceities, or absolute discernibility. Contextual individuation can be grounded in relations, but this is compatible with absolute, relative or weak discernibility. Contextual individuation is compatible with the denial of haecceitism, and this is more harmonious with science. Structuralism implies contextual individuation. In mathematics contextual individuation is in general primitive. In physics contextual individuation may be grounded in relations via (...)
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  24. The Varieties of Religious Experience: A Study in Human Nature.William James - 1929 - New York: Cambridge University Press. Edited by Matthew Bradley.
    The Gifford Lectures were established in 1885 at the universities of St Andrews, Glasgow, Aberdeen and Edinburgh to promote the discussion of 'Natural Theology in the widest sense of the term - in other words, the knowledge of God', and some of the world's most influential thinkers have delivered them. The 1901–2 lectures given in Edinburgh by American philosopher William James are considered by many to be the greatest in the series. The lectures were published in book form in (...)
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  25. Three challenges to ethics: environmentalism, feminism, and multiculturalism.James P. Sterba - 2001 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    In this unique work, James P. Sterba argues that traditional ethics has yet to confront the three significant challenges posed by environmentalism, feminism, and multiculturalism. He maintains that while traditional ethics has been quite successful at dealing with the problems it faces, it has not addressed the possibility that its solutions to these problems are biased in favor of humans, men, and Western culture. In Three Challenges to Ethics: Environmentalism, Feminism, and Multiculturalism, Sterba examines each of these challenges. In (...)
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  26.  21
    A comparison of the scientific quality of publicly and privately funded randomized controlled drug trials.Richard Jones, Stuart Younie, Andrew Macallister & Jim Thornton - 2010 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (6):1322-1325.
  27. On Scepticism About Ought Simpliciter.James L. D. Brown - 2023 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy.
    Scepticism about ought simpliciter is the view that there is no such thing as what one ought simpliciter to do. Instead, practical deliberation is governed by a plurality of normative standpoints, each authoritative from their own perspective but none authoritative simpliciter. This paper aims to resist such scepticism. After setting out the challenge in general terms, I argue that scepticism can be resisted by rejecting a key assumption in the sceptic’s argument. This is the assumption that standpoint-relative ought judgments bring (...)
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  28.  10
    Governing mechanistic studies to understand human biology.Raymond MacAllister & Kristin Veighey - 2012 - Research Ethics 8 (4):212-215.
    Mechanistic studies may be defined as ‘an experiment, using an intervention in healthy subjects or patients, to better understand human biology and/or disease’. Such studies provide useful physiological insights into clinical conditions in humans and expand our knowledge of physiology in health and disease. Well-planned mechanistic studies are therefore a vital step in progressing drug discovery in humans. It is important in such studies that the rights and safety of research participants are preserved, while at the same time not allowing (...)
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  29.  15
    Aristotle's philosophy of biology: studies in the origins of life science.James G. Lennox - 2000 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    In addition to being one of the world's most influential philosophers, Aristotle can also be credited with the creation of both the science of biology and the philosophy of biology. He was the first thinker to treat the investigations of the living world as a distinct inquiry with its own special concepts and principles. This book focuses on a seminal event in the history of biology - Aristotle's delineation of a special branch of theoretical knowledge devoted to the systematic investigation (...)
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  30.  22
    The political works of James I.I. James & Charles Howard McIlwain - 1918 - Union, N.J.: Lawbook Exchange. Edited by Charles Howard McIlwain.
    James I. The Political Works of James I. Reprinted from the Edition of 1616. With an Introduction by Charles Howard McIlwain. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1918. cxi, 354 pp. Reprinted 2002 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.
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  31. The Late King James's Manifesto Answer'd Paragraph by Paragraph. Wherein the Weakness of His Reasons is Plainly Demonstrated.James - 1697 - Printed, and Are to Be Sold by Richard Baldwin, Near the Oxford-Arms in Warwick-Lane.
     
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  32. Questions, Quantifiers and Crossing. Higginbotham, James & Robert May - 1981 - Linguistic Review 1:41--80.
     
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  33. Pragmatism: A New Name for Some Old Ways of Thinking.William James - 2014 - Gorham, ME: Cambridge University Press. Edited by Eric C. Sheffield.
    One of the great American pragmatic philosophers alongside Peirce and Dewey, William James (1842–1910) delivered these eight lectures in Boston and New York in the winter of 1906–7. Though he credits Peirce with coining the term 'pragmatism', James highlights in his subtitle that this 'new name' describes a philosophical temperament as old as Socrates. The pragmatic approach, he says, takes a middle way between rationalism's airy principles and empiricism's hard facts. James' pragmatism is both a method of (...)
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  34. Humean Doubts about the Practical Justification of Morality.James Dreier - 1997 - In Garrett Cullity & Berys Nigel Gaut (eds.), Ethics and practical reason. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 81-100.
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  35.  49
    Stand Out of Our Light: Freedom and Resistance in the Attention Economy.James Williams - 2018 - Cambridge University Press.
    Former Google advertising strategist, now Oxford-trained philosopher James Williams launches a plea to society and to the tech industry to help ensure that the technology we all carry with us every day does not distract us from pursuing our true goals in life. As information becomes ever more plentiful, the resource that is becoming more scarce is our attention. In this 'attention economy', we need to recognise the fundamental impacts of our new information environment on our lives in order (...)
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  36. On Semantics.James Higginbotham - 1987 - In Ernest LePore (ed.), New directions in semantics. Orlando: Academic Press. pp. 1--54.
     
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  37.  97
    Philosophical Foundations for a Christian Worldview.James Porter Moreland & William Lane Craig - 2003 - Downers Grove, Illinois: Intervarsity Press.
    The authors of this lively and thorough introduction to philosophy from a Christian perspective introduce you to the principal subdisciplines of philosophy, including epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of science, ethics and philosophy ...
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  38. The Semantics of Questions.James Higginbotham - 1996 - In Shalom Lappin (ed.), The Handbook of Contemporary Semantic Theory. Cambridge, Mass., USA: Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  39.  67
    Introduction to philosophy: classical and contemporary readings.Louis P. Pojman & James Fieser (eds.) - 2004 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Now in a third edition, Introduction to Philosophy: Classical and Contemporary Readings is a highly acclaimed, topically organized collection that covers five major areas of philosophy--theory of knowledge, philosophy of religion, philosophy of mind, freedom and determinism, and moral philosophy. Editor Louis P. Pojman enhances the text's topical organization by arranging the selections into a pro/con format to help students better understand opposing arguments. He also includes accessible introductions to each chapter, subsection, and individual reading, a unique feature for an (...)
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  40. Well-being: its meaning, measurement, and moral importance.James Griffin - 1986 - Oxford [Oxfordshire]: Clarendon Press.
    "Well-being," "welfare," "utility," and "quality of life," all closely related concepts, are at the center of morality, politics, law, and economics. Griffin's book, while primarily a volume of moral philosophy, is relevant to all of these subjects. Griffin offers answers to three central questions about well-being: what is the best way to understand it, can it be measured, and where should it fit in moral and political thought. With its breadth of investigation and depth of insight, this work holds significance (...)
  41.  25
    Analysis of the phenomena of the human mind.James Mill - 1869 - New York,: A. M. Kelley. Edited by John Stuart Mill.
    We have now seen that, in what we call the mental world, Consciousness,- there are three grand classes of phenomena, the most familiar of all the facts with ...
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  42. Structure not Selection.James A. C. Ladyman - 2021 - In Anjan Chakravartty (ed.), Contemporary Scientific Realism and the Challenge from the History of Science. London, England: Oxford University Press.
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  43. What is computer ethics?James H. Moor - 1985 - Metaphilosophy 16 (4):266-275.
  44. Varieties of Second-Personal Reason.James H. P. Lewis - forthcoming - Erkenntnis:1-21.
    A lineage of prominent philosophers who have discussed the second-person relation can be regarded as advancing structural accounts. They posit that the second-person relation effects one transformative change to the structure of practical reasoning. In this paper, I criticise this orthodoxy and offer an alternative, substantive account. That is, I argue that entering into second-personal relations with others does indeed affect one's practical reasoning, but it does this not by altering the structure of one's agential thought, but by changing what (...)
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  45. The no-self theory: Hume, Buddhism, and personal identity.James Giles - 1993 - Philosophy East and West 43 (2):175-200.
    The problem of personal identity is often said to be one of accounting for what it is that gives persons their identity over time. However, once the problem has been construed in these terms, it is plain that too much has already been assumed. For what has been assumed is just that persons do have an identity. A new interpretation of Hume's no-self theory is put forward by arguing for an eliminative rather than a reductive view of personal identity, and (...)
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  46. The aesthetics of coming to know someone.James H. P. Lewis - 2023 - Philosophical Studies (5-6):1-16.
    This paper is about the similarity between the appreciation of a piece of art, such as a cherished music album, and the loving appreciation of a person whom one knows well. In philosophical discussion about the rationality of love, the Qualities View (QV) says that love can be justified by reference to the qualities of the beloved. I argue that the oft-rehearsed trading-up objection fails to undermine the QV. The problems typically identified by the objection arise from the idea that (...)
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  47. New reasons for realism.James J. Gibson - 1967 - Synthese 17 (1):162 - 172.
    Both the psychology of perception and the philosophy of perception seem to show a new face when the process is considered at its own level, distinct from that of sensation. Unfamiliar conceptions in physics, anatomy, physiology, psychology, and phenomenology are required to clarify the separation and make it plausible. But there have been so many dead ends in the effort to solve the theoretical problems of perception that radical proposals may now be acceptable. Scientists are often more conservative than philosophers (...)
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  48. Harsh justice: criminal punishment and the widening divide between America and Europe.James Q. Whitman - 2003 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Why is American punishment so cruel? While in continental Europe great efforts are made to guarantee that prisoners are treated humanely, in America sentences have gotten longer and rehabilitation programs have fallen by the wayside. Western Europe attempts to prepare its criminals for life after prison, whereas many American prisons today leave their inhabitants reduced and debased. In the last quarter of a century, Europe has worked to ensure that the baser human inclination toward vengeance is not reflected by state (...)
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  49. The causal mechanical model of explanation.James Woodward - 1989 - Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science 13:359-83.
  50. Proofs and pictures.James Robert Brown - 1997 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 48 (2):161-180.
    Everyone appreciates a clever mathematical picture, but the prevailing attitude is one of scepticism: diagrams, illustrations, and pictures prove nothing; they are psychologically important and heuristically useful, but only a traditional verbal/symbolic proof provides genuine evidence for a purported theorem. Like some other recent writers (Barwise and Etchemendy [1991]; Shin [1994]; and Giaquinto [1994]) I take a different view and argue, from historical considerations and some striking examples, for a positive evidential role for pictures in mathematics.
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