Results for 'Major Philosophers'

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  1. Major Philosophers of Jewish Prayer in the Twentieth Century.Jack Cohen - 2000 - Fordham University Press.
    Major Philosophers of Jewish Prayer in the Twentieth Century addresses the troubling questions posed by the modern Jewish worshiper, including such obstacles to prayer as the inability to concentrate on the words and meanings of formal liturgy, the paucity of emotional involvement, the lack of theological conviction, the anthropomorphic and particularly the masculine emphasis of prayer nomenclature, and other matters. In assessing these difficultites, Cohen brings to the reader the writings on prayer of some seminal 20th century Jewish (...)
     
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  2. Essentials of Neo-Confucianism Eight Major Philosophers of the Song and Ming Periods.Siu-chi Huang - 1999
     
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  3. Fifty Major Philosophers a Reference Guide.Diané Collinson - 1987
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  4. Fifty Major Philosophers.Diane Collison (ed.) - 2006 - Routledge.
    First published in 1988. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
     
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  5. Siu-Chi Huang, Essentials of Neo-Confucianism. Eight Major Philosophers of the Song and Ming Periods Reviewed By.Steven J. Willett - 2000 - Philosophy in Review 20 (6):415-417.
     
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  6.  22
    Fifty Major Philosophers.William L. Reese - 1988 - Teaching Philosophy 11 (2):188-189.
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    Fifty Major Philosophers: A Reference Guide. [REVIEW]William L. Reese - 1988 - Teaching Philosophy 11 (2):188-189.
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  8.  1
    Fifty Major Philosophers: A Reference Guide by Diane Collinson Croom Helm, 1987. 170 Pp. £22.50. [REVIEW]G. A. J. Rogers - 1988 - Philosophical Books 29 (2):80-81.
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  9. Existentialism and Human Existence: An Account of Five Major Philosophers.Thomas Koenig - 1992 - Krieger.
    [1] The phenomenology of Edmund Husserl -- The existential philosophy of Albert Camus -- The existenz philosophy of Karl Jaspers -- The philosophy of Gabriel Marcel -- The philosophy of Martin Heidegger -- v. 2. The existential philosophy of Søren Kierkegaard -- The existential philosophy of Ortega y Gasset -- The philosophy of Martin Buber -- The existential philosophy of Nicolas Berdyaev -- The philosophy of Paul Ricoeur.
     
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  10. Philosophical Dilemmas: A Pro and Con Introduction to the Major Questions and Philosophers.Phil Washburn - 2015 - Oup Usa.
    Philosophical Dilemmas: A Pro and Con Introduction to the Major Questions and Philosophers, Fourth Edition, outlines the classic arguments made by philosophers through the ages. It features sixty-three brief topical essays by author Phil Washburn organized around thirty-one fundamental philosophical questions like "Does God exist?" "Is morality relative?" and "Are we free?" Each essay takes a definite stand and promotes it vigorously, creating a sharp contrast between the two positions and giving each abstract theory a more personal (...)
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  11. To the Profound Regret of Indologists, Philosophers and Scholars of Religion and Cross-Cultural Studies, Our Esteemed Colleague Wilhelm Halbfass Passed Away on May 25, 2000, After Suf-Fering a Severe Stroke. He Passed Away Peacefully the Next Day. Halbfass' Premature Death, Shortly After His Sixtieth Birthday, has Bereaved Indologists and Philosophers of a Major and Unique Voice, and of an Irreplaceable Authoritative Presence. In an Obituary John Taber Said. [REVIEW]Cf E. Franco & K. Preisendanz - 2006 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 2000:426.
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  12.  14
    The Spirit of Western Philosophy. An Historical Interpretation Including Selections From the Major European Philosophers[REVIEW]William Lowe Bryan - 1951 - Journal of Philosophy 48 (10):341-342.
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    Review: Newton P. Stallknecht, Robert S. Brumbaugh, The Spirit of Western Philosophy. A Historical Interpretation Including Selections From the Major European Philosophers[REVIEW]Irving M. Copi - 1970 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 35 (1):164-164.
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  14.  1
    The Spirit of Western Philosophy. A Historical Interpretation Including Selections From the Major European Philosophers.Irving M. Copi, Newton P. Stallknecht & Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1970 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 35 (1):164.
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  15. Stallknecht Newton P. And Brumbaugh Robert S.. The Spirit of Western Philosophy. A Historical Interpretation Including Selections From the Major European Philosophers, Longmans, Green and Co., New York, London, and Toronto, 1950, Xxiii + 540 Pp. [REVIEW]Irving M. Copi - 1970 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 35 (1):164.
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  16. Great Thinkers of the Western World the Major Ideas and Classic Works of More Than 100 Outstanding Western Philosophers, Physical and Social Scientists, Psychologists, Religious Writers, and Theologians.Ian Philip Mcgreal - 1992
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  17. Major Works of Individual Philosophers Are Collected at the End of the Relevant Essay in the Text.V. Meja & D. Misgeld - 2010 - In Alan D. Schrift (ed.), The History of Continental Philosophy. University of Chicago Press. pp. 4--321.
     
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  18. The Spirit of Western Philosophy. An Historical Interpretation Including Selections From the Major European Philosophers.Newton P. Stallknecht & Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1951 - Journal of Philosophy 48 (10):341-342.
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  19. The Spirit of Western Philosophy a Historical Interpretation Including Selections From the Major European Philosophers [by] Newton P. Stallknecht [and] Robert S. Brumbaugh.Newton Phelps Stallknecht & Robert Sherrick Brumbaugh - 1964 - D. Mckay Co.
     
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  20. The Spirit of Western Philosophy a Historical Interpretation Including Selections From the Major European Philosophers.Newton Phelps Stallknecht & Robert Sherrick Brumbaugh - 1950 - David Mckay Co.
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  21.  26
    Whitehead, Russell, and Moore: Tree Analytic Philosophers.Bogdan Rusu & Ronny Desmet - 2012 - Process Studies 41 (2):214-234.
    The aim of this historically oriented article is to give an account of the methodological similarity of Whitehead and Russell with regard to the logico-mathematicalmode of philosophical analysis, and of Whitehead and Moore with regard to common sense. According to the authors, these similarities, especially when taken together, justify the classification of Whitehead as an analytic philosopher. Because of the doctrinal uniqueness of Whitehead, however, they also hold that he will always remain an atypical analytic philosopher.
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  22.  4
    Calvin L. Troup, Ed., Augustine for the Philosophers: The Rhetor of Hippo, the Confessions, and the Continentals.Thomas McNulty - 2018 - Augustinian Studies 49 (1):174-178.
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    On History and Philosophers of History.Donald R. Kelley - 1990 - New Vico Studies 8:139-140.
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    The Development of Augustine's Metaphilosophy: Col 2:8 and the “Philosophers of This World”.Giovanni Catapano - 2007 - Augustinian Studies 38 (1):233-254.
  25.  14
    St. Augustine's Dilemma. Grace and Eternal Law in the Major Works of Augustine of Hippo.Anne-Marie Bowery - 2001 - Augustinian Studies 32 (1):147-150.
  26.  17
    Some Under- and Over-Rated Great Philosophers.Charles Hartshorne - 1992 - Process Studies 21 (3):166-174.
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    Philosophers and Friends.Leemon B. McHenry - 1997 - Process Studies 26 (3/4):338-339.
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    Darwin and Some Philosophers.Charles Hartshorne - 2001 - Process Studies 30 (2):276-288.
  29.  7
    Dewey, Russell , Whitehead: Philosophers as Educators by Brian P. Hendley.Douglas Simpson, William Bruneau & Adam Scarfe - 2012 - Process Studies 41 (2):342-349.
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    Two Process Philosophers.David A. Pailin - 1974 - Process Studies 4 (2):133-140.
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    Literary Philosophers.Tim Madigan - 2016 - Overheard in Seville 34 (34):16-22.
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  32.  20
    Whitehead and Analytic Philosophy of Mind.George W. Shields - 2012 - Process Studies 41 (2):287-336.
    My purpose in this essay is to provide a critical survey of arguments within recent analytic philosophy regarding the so-called “mind-body problem” with a particular view toward the relationship between these arguments and the philosophy of A.N. Whitehead .1In course, I shall argue that Whitehead’s panexperientialist physicalism avoids paradoxes and difficulties of both materialist-physicalism and Cartesian dualismas advocated by a variety of analytic philosophers. However, and I believe that this point is not often sufficiently recognized, analytic philosophy of mind (...)
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  33.  20
    Leibniz and the Problem of Temporary Truths.Giovanni Merlo - 2017 - The Leibniz Review 27:31-63.
    Not unlike many contemporary philosophers, Leibniz admitted the existence of temporary truths, true propositions that have not always been or will not always be true. In contrast with contemporary philosophers, though, Leibniz conceived of truth in terms of analytic containment: on his view, the truth of a predicative sentence consists in the analytic containment of the concept expressed by the predicate in the concept expressed by the subject. Given that analytic relations among concepts are eternal and unchanging, the (...)
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  34.  73
    Epistemology Moralized: David Hume's Practical Epistemology.Michael Ridge - 2003 - Hume Studies 29 (2):165-204.
    - Peter Railton1 Railton's remark is accurate; contemporary philosophers almost invariably suppose that morality is more vulnerable than empirical science to scepticism. Yet David Hume apparently embraces an inversion of this twentieth century orthodoxy.2 In book I of the Treatise, he claims that the understanding, when it reflects upon itself, "entirely subverts itself" (T 1. 4.7.7; SBN 267) while, in contrast, in book III he claims that our moral faculty, when reflecting upon itself, acquires "new force" (T 3.3.6.3; SBN (...)
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  35. Hume and Locke on Scientific Methodology: The Newtonian Legacy.Graciela de Pierris - 2006 - Hume Studies 32 (2):277-329.
    Hume follows Newton in replacing the mechanical philosophy’s demonstrative ideal of science by the Principia’s ideal of inductive proof ; in this respect, Hume differs sharply from Locke. Hume is also guided by Newton’s own criticisms of the mechanical philosophers’ hypotheses. The first stage of Hume’s skeptical argument concerning causation targets central tenets of the mechanical philosophers’ conception of causation, all of which rely on the a priori postulation of a hidden configuration of primary qualities. The skeptical argument (...)
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  36.  98
    Polanyi and Peirce on the Critical Method.David W. Agler - 2011 - Tradition and Discovery 38 (3):13-30.
    This essay points to parallel criticisms made by Charles Peirce and Polanyi against the “critical method”or “method of doubt.” In an early set of essays and in later work, Peirce claimed that the Cartesian method of doubt is both philosophically bankrupt and useless because practitioners do not apply the method upon the criteria of doubting itself. Likewise, in his 1952 essay “The Stability of Beliefs” and in Personal Knowledge, Polanyi charges practitioners of the critical method with a failure to apply (...)
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  37. Spinoza’s Theological-Political Treatise: A Critical Guide.Hasana Sharp - 2011 - The Leibniz Review 21:175-183.
    Despite his importance in philosophical canon, as the editors of the volume under consideration observe, contemporary philosophers without a religious education are not in a great position to examine, for example, Spinoza's analysis of scripture, which comprises a substantial portion of his Theological-Political Treatise. Nevertheless,interest in Spinoza is growing and there is increased willingness to work through questions like "whether the apostles wrote their epistles as apostles and prophets, or as teachers." This is owed in no insignificant part to (...)
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  38.  54
    Hume on the Moral Obligation to Justice.James A. Harris - 2010 - Hume Studies 36 (1):25-50.
    Our understanding of the philosophers of the past is not always assisted by the attempt to fit them under one or other of the categories that we currently use to map the philosophical landscape. We have grown used to the idea that there are three principal kinds of moral theory—deontological and broadly Kantian, consequentialist and broadly Millian, virtue-theoretic and broadly Aristotelian—and so historical approaches to moral philosophy tend to orientate themselves by assuming that each and every object of study (...)
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  39.  69
    Does Hume Have an Instrumental Conception of Practical Reason?Jean Hampton - 1995 - Hume Studies 21 (1):57-74.
    Many philosophers and social scientists regard the instrumental theory of practical reason as highly plausible, and standardly credit David Hume as the first philosopher to formulate this conception of reason clearly. Yet Hume does not advocate the instrumental conception of practical reason as that conception is normally understood by contemporary theorists who endorse it. Instead, Hume's view is that there is no such thing as "practical reason", that is, no such thing as a form of reason that has either (...)
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  40. Philosophical Relations, Natural Relations, and Philosophic Decisionism in Belief in the External World: Comments on P. J. E. Kail, Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy[REVIEW]Eric Schliesser - 2010 - Hume Studies 36 (1):67-76.
    My critical comments on Part I of P. J. E. Kail's Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy are divided into two parts. First, I challenge the exegetical details of Kail's take on Hume's important distinction between natural and philosophical relations. I show that Kail misreads Hume in a subtle fashion. If I am right, then much of the machinery that Kail puts into place for his main argument does different work in Hume than Kail thinks. Second, I offer a brief (...)
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  41. The Itinerary of Intersubjectivity in Social Phenomenological Research.Kenneth Liberman - 2009 - Schutzian Research 1:149-164.
    The struggles that Alfred Schutz, Aron Gurwitsch, Harold Garfinkel, and other social phenomenologists and ethnomethodologists have had with Edmund Husserl’s progenitive but inconsistent notion of intersubjectivity are summarized and assessed. In particular, an account of Schutz’s objections to intersubjective constitution is presented. The commonly pervading elements and major differences within this lineage of inquiry – a four generation-long lineage of teacher and student that commences with Husserl, runs through Schutz and Gurwitsch, then Garfinkel, and then the present author and (...)
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  42. The Personal and the Subjective.Marjorie Grene - 1995 - Tradition and Discovery 22 (3):6-16.
    The contrast between the personal and the subjective is a central aspect of Polanyi's argument in Personal Knowledge; this essay examines the way this distinction is developed and offers possible reasons Polanyi has been misunderstood on this point. It also discusses some ambiguities in Polanyi's use of "subjective" and "subjectivity" and comments on the general neglect of Polanyi's work by philosophers.
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  43.  9
    Philosophy and Philosophers: An Introduction to Western Philosophy.John Shand - 1993 - Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    Philosophy and Philosophers is an important introduction to Western philosophy aimed at those who are unfamiliar with the nature of philosophy and its history. It is organized around the main schools of philosophical thought and ranges from ancient Greece, through the explosion of ideas in the seventeenth century, to the Enlightenment and the challenge of twentieth-century philosophy. In each chapter John Shand assesses the contribution of a single philosopher, paying particular attention to the key areas of the theory of (...)
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  44.  3
    Visibilizing the Invisible in Painting.Edward S. Casey - 2017 - Chiasmi International 19:239-253.
    I write here about how the visible and the invisible intertwine in painting: in theory and in praxis – primarily the praxis of my own painting. Philosophers are rarely asked to discuss, much less to show in public, what they do avocationally rather than professionally. I was drawn to the invitation of the Merleau-Ponty Circle to exhibit my painting and to talk about what I do when I am not writing or teaching philosophy. It has offered a rare chance (...)
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    Could David Hume Have Known About Buddhism?Alison Gopnik - 2009 - Hume Studies 35 (1-2):5-28.
    Philosophers and Buddhist scholars have noted the affinities between David Hume's empiricism and the Buddhist philosophical tradition. I show that it was possible for Hume to have had contact with Buddhist philosophical views. The link to Buddhism comes through the Jesuit scholars at the Royal College of La Fleche. Charles Francois Dolu was a Jesuit missionary who lived at the Royal College from 1723-1740, overlapping with Hume's stay. He had extensive knowledge both of other religions and cultures and of (...)
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    The Non-Aristotelian Novelty of Leibniz’s Teleology.Laurence Carlin - 2011 - The Leibniz Review 21:69-90.
    My aim in this paper is to underscore the novelty of Leibniz’s teleology from a historical perspective. I believe this perspective helps deliver a better understanding of the finer details of Leibniz’s employment of final causes. I argue in this paper that Leibniz was taking a stance on three central teleological issues that derive from Aristotle, issues that seem to have occupied nearly every advocate of final causes from Aristotle to Leibniz. I discuss the three Aristotelian issues, and how (...) thinkers treated them in the medieval period. I argue that Leibniz rejected all of the mainstream Aristotelian teleological views on these issues. I conclude that Leibniz broke with longstanding threads of teleological thinking in ways that were often extreme. (shrink)
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    The Idea of Chivalry in the Scottish Enlightenment.Ryu Susato - 2007 - Hume Studies 33 (1):155-178.
    It is generally assumed that in early modern Britain, chivalry—allegedly typified by the Crusades—was considered a negative or even ridiculous ideology until its rehabilitation by the pre-Romantic movement. However, this paper argues that Hume and other Scottish Enlightenment thinkers had already shown a deep interest in its historical role and influence on modern civilization. That Hume shared a broad interest in chivalry with contemporary philosophers does not undermine the novelty of his thought on this topic. In fact, the pioneering (...)
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  48. Cohorting, Networking, Bonding.Tibor Frank - 2001 - Tradition and Discovery 28 (2):5-19.
    This paper presents Michael Polanyi’s escape from Berlin to Manchester as part of a major wave of intellectual migration at the time of Hitler’s rise in Germany in 1933. Many émigré scientists and social scientists from Hungary experienced forced and unexpected relocation twice in the interwar era: first in 1919-20, after the fall of the Bolshevik-type Hungarian Republic of Councils, and again after the Nazi takeover. Once in exile, they formed an unusually tight support group assisting each other by (...)
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    The Idea of Chivalry in the Scottish Enlightenment: The Case of David Hume.Ryu Susato - 2007 - Hume Studies 33 (1):155-178.
    It is generally assumed that in early modern Britain, chivalry—allegedly typified by the Crusades—was considered a negative or even ridiculous ideology until its rehabilitation by the pre-Romantic movement. However, this paper argues that Hume and other Scottish Enlightenment thinkers had already shown a deep interest in its historical role and influence on modern civilization. That Hume shared a broad interest in chivalry with contemporary philosophers does not undermine the novelty of his thought on this topic. In fact, the pioneering (...)
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    Pre-Leibnizian Moral Necessity.Michael J. Murray - 2004 - The Leibniz Review 14:1-28.
    The mature Leibniz frequently uses the phrase “moral necessity” in the context of discussing free choice. In this essay I provide a seventeenth century geneology of the phrase. I show that the doctrine of moral necessity was developed by scholastic philosophers who sought to retain a robust notion of freedom while purging bruteness from their systems. Two sorts of bruteness were special targets. The first is metaphysical bruteness, according to which contingent events or states of affairs occur without a (...)
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