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Manuel Velasquez [19]Manuel G. Velasquez [12]
  1.  88
    Debunking Corporate Moral Responsibility.Manuel Velasquez - 2003 - Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (4):531-562.
    I address three topics. First, I argue that the issue of corporate moral responsibility is an important one for business ethics.Second, I examine a core argument for the claim that the corporate organization is a separate moral agent and show it is based on anunnoticed but elementary mistake deriving from the fallacy of division. Third, I examine the assumptions collectivists make about whatit means to say that organizations act and that they act intentionally and show that these assumptions are mistaken (...)
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  2. Why Corporations Are Not Morally Responsible for Anything They Do.Manuel G. Velasquez - 1983 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 2 (3):1-18.
    Properly speaking, the corporation, considered as an entity distinct from its members, cannot be morally responsible for wrongful corporate acts. Setting aside (in this abstract) acts brought about through negligence or omissions, we may say that moral responsibility for an act attaches to that agent (or agents) in whom the act "originates" in this sense: (1) the agent formed the (mental) intention or plan to bring about that act (possibly with the help of others) and (2) the act was intentionally (...)
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  3.  32
    The Influence of Christian Religiosity on Managerial Decisions Concerning the Environment.Jinhua Cui, Hoje Jo & Manuel G. Velasquez - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (1):203-231.
    The issue of management’s relations to the environment has received a significant amount of attention in the literature on corporate social responsibility. Yet the influence of religion on managers’ environmental decisions has until now remained unexamined despite its known importance. In this article, we examine the empirical association between religion—primarily Christianity—and the environmental practices a firm’s management undertakes by investigating their OLS, principal component, simultaneous, and endogenous effects. Employing a large and extensive U.S. sample, we find a negative association between (...)
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  4.  45
    Globalization and the Failure of Ethics.Manuel Velasquez - 2000 - Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (1):343-352.
    As the 21st century breaks upon us, no ethical issues in business appear as significant as those being created by the rapidglobalization of business. Globalization has created numerous ethical problems for the manager of the multinational corporation. What does justice demand, for example, in the relations between a multinational and its host country, particularly when that country is less developed? Should human rights principles govern the relations between a multinational and the workers of a host country, and if so, which (...)
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  5.  8
    Ethics of the Attention Economy: The Problem of Social Media Addiction.Vikram R. Bhargava & Manuel Velasquez - forthcoming - Business Ethics Quarterly:1-39.
    Social media companies commonly design their platforms in a way that renders them addictive. Some governments have declared internet addiction a major public health concern, and the World Health Organization has characterized excessive internet use as a growing problem. Our article shows why scholars, policy makers, and the managers of social media companies should treat social media addiction as a serious moral problem. While the benefits of social media are not negligible, we argue that social media addiction raises unique ethical (...)
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  6.  28
    Community Religion, Employees, and the Social License to Operate.Jinhua Cui, Hoje Jo & Manuel G. Velasquez - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (4):775-807.
    The World Bank recently noted: “Social license to operate has traditionally referred to the conduct of firms with regard to the impact on local communities and the environment, but the definition has expanded in recent years to include issues related to worker and human rights”. In this paper, we examine a factor that can influence the kind of work conditions that can facilitate or obstruct a firm’s attempts to achieve the social license to operate. Specifically, we examine the empirical association (...)
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  7.  56
    Making Business Ethics Practical.Gerald F. Cavanagh, Dennis J. Moberg & Manuel Velasquez - 1995 - Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (3):399-418.
    Our critics confuse the role normative ethical theory can take in business ethics. We argue that as a practical discipline, business ethics must focus on norms, not the theories from which the norms derive. It is true that our original work is defective, but not in its form, but in its neglect of contemporary advances in feminist ethics.
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  8.  10
    Christian Religiosity and Corporate Community Involvement.Jinhua Cui, Hoje Jo & Manuel G. Velasquez - 2019 - Business Ethics Quarterly 29 (1):85-125.
    ABSTRACT:We examine whether religion influences company decisions related to corporate community involvement. Employing a large US sample, we show that the CCI initiatives of a company are positively associated with the level of Christian religiosity present in the region within which that company’s headquarters is located. This association persists even after we control for a wide range of firm characteristics and after we subject our results to several econometric tests. These results support our religious morality hypothesis which holds that companies (...)
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  9.  77
    International Business, Morality, and the Common Good.Manuel Velasquez - 1992 - Business Ethics Quarterly 2 (1):27-40.
    The author sets out a realist defense of the claim that in the absence of an international enforcement agency, multinational corporations operating in a competitive international environment cannot be said to have a moral obligation to contribute to the international common good, provided that interactions are nonrepetitive and provided effective signals of agent reliability are not possible. Examples of international common goods that meet these conditions are support of the global ozone layer and avoidance of the global greenhouse effect. Pointing (...)
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  10.  36
    Workforce Diversity and Religiosity.Jinhua Cui, Hoje Jo, Haejung Na & Manuel G. Velasquez - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (4):743-767.
    Workforce diversity has received increasing amounts of attention from academics and practitioners alike. In this article, we examine the empirical association between a firm’s workforce diversity and the degree of religiosity of the firm’s management by investigating their unidirectional and endogenous effects. Employing a large and extensive U.S. sample of firms from the years 1991–2010, we find a positive association between a measure of the firm’s commitment to diversity and the religiosity of the firm’s management after controlling for various firm (...)
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  11.  9
    Towards an Ethical Wealth of Nations: An Institutional Perspective on the Relation Between Ethical Values and National Economic Prosperity.Peter L. Jennings & Manuel Velasquez - 2015 - Business Ethics Quarterly 25 (4):461-488.
    ABSTRACT:In this paper we examine how ethical values contribute to national economic prosperity. We extend the concept of an ethical wealth of nations first introduced by Donaldson in which he proposed four categories of ethical values—fairer distribution of goods, better government, ingrained social cooperation, and inculcation of economic duties—that can drive economic performance, but only if citizens ascribe “intrinsic value” to them independent of their economic interests. Our analysis draws on institutional economics and sociology research to show that if ethical (...)
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  12.  78
    The Ethics of Mentoring.Dennis J. Moberg & Manuel Velasquez - 2004 - Business Ethics Quarterly 14 (1):95-122.
    Mentoring is an age-old process that continues to be practiced in most contemporary organizations. Although mentors are oftenheralded as virtuous agents of essential continuity, mentoring commonly results in serious dysfunctions. Not only do mentors too oftenexclude people different from themselves, but also the people they mentor are frequently abused in the process. Based on the conception of mentor as a quasi-professional, this paper lays out the ethical responsibilities of both parties in the mentoring process.
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  13.  22
    International Business Ethics: The Aluminum Companies in Jamaica.Manuel Velasquez - 1995 - Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (4):865-882.
    I evaluate the adequacy of the three models of international business ethics that have been recently proposed by Thomas Donald son, Gerard Elfstrom and Richard De George. Using the example of the conduct of the aluminum companies in Jamaica, I argue that these three models fail to address the most important of the ethical issues encountered by multinationals because they focus too narrowly on human rights issues and on utilitarian considerations. In addition I argue that these models also evidence an (...)
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  14.  9
    International Business Ethics: The Aluminium Companies in Jamaica.Manuel Velasquez - 1995 - Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (4):865-882.
    I evaluate the adequacy of the three models of international business ethics that have been recently proposed by Thomas Donald son, Gerard Elfstrom and Richard De George. Using the example of the conduct of the aluminum companies in Jamaica, I argue that these three models fail to address the most important of the ethical issues encountered by multinationals because they focus too narrowly on human rights issues and on utilitarian considerations. In addition I argue that these models also evidence an (...)
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  15.  8
    Natural Law and Business Ethics.Manuel Velasquez & F. Neil Brady - 1997 - Business Ethics Quarterly 7 (2):83-107.
    We describe the Catholic natural law tradition by examining its origins in the medieval penitentials, the papal decretals, the writings of Thomas Aquinas, and seventeenth century casuistry. Catholic natural law emerges as a flexible ethic that conceives of human nature as rational and as oriented to certain basic goods that ought to be pursued and whose pursuit is made possible by the virtues. We then identify four approaches to natural law that have evolved within the United States during the twentieth (...)
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  16. The Ethics of Consumer Production.Manuel G. Velasquez - 2005 - In Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.), Business Ethics. Sage Publications. pp. 3.
     
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  17. Abstract of “Why Corporations Are Not Morally Responsible for Anything They Do”.Manuel G. Velasquez - 1983 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 2 (4):99-99.
    Properly speaking, the corporation, considered as an entity distinct from its members, cannot be morally responsible for wrongful corporate acts. Setting aside (in this abstract) acts brought about through negligence or omissions, we may say that moral responsibility for an act attaches to that agent (or agents) in whom the act "originates" in this sense: (1) the agent formed the (mental) intention or plan to bring about that act (possibly with the help of others) and (2) the act was intentionally (...)
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  18. Corruption and Bribery.Manuel Velasquez - 2010 - In George G. Brenkert & Tom L. Beauchamp (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Business Ethics. Oxford University Press.
     
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  19.  24
    Catholic Natural Law and Business Ethics.Manuel Velasquez - 2001 - Spiritual Goods 2001:107-140.
    This article describes Catholic natural law tradition by examining its origins in the medieval penitentials, the papal decretals, the writings of Thomas Aquinas, and seventeenth-century casuistry. Catholic natural law emerges as a flexible ethic that conceives of human nature as rational and as oriented to certain basic goods that ought to be pursued and whose pursuit is made possible by the virtues. Four approaches to natural law that have evolved within the United States during the twentieth century are then identified, (...)
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  20.  17
    Commentary.Manuel Velasquez - 1985 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 4 (2):35-38.
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  21.  26
    Development, Justice, and Technology Transfer in China: The Case of HP and Legend. [REVIEW]Manuel Velasquez - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (S2):157 - 166.
    In 1978, 16 months after Mao Zedong's death, China's new leader, Deng Xiaoping, introduced market reforms and an "opening" to the West that allowed the US company Hewlett-Packard (HP) to enter China in 1981. Shortly thereafter, HP began a partnership with the Chinese company Legend Computer (now Lenovo), through which HP transferred its technology in four main areas: (1) product technology, (2) business model, (3) management practices, and (4) strategic planning processes. This technology transfer seems to be a "just exchange" (...)
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  22.  20
    Introduction: International Business Firms, Economic Development, and Ethics.Frederick Bird, Joseph Smucker & Manuel Velasquez - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (S2):81 - 84.
    In 1978, 16 months after Mao Zedong’s death, China’s new leader, Deng Xiaoping, introduced market reforms and an “opening” to the West that allowed the US company Hewlett-Packard to enter China in 1981. Shortly thereafter, HP began a partnership with the Chinese company Legend Computer, through which HP transferred its technology in four main areas: product technology, business model, management practices, and strategic planning processes. This technology transfer seems to be a “just exchange” in that HP received access to China’s (...)
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  23.  7
    Guest Editors’ Introduction.Martin Calkins, Dennis J. Moberg, Manuel Velasquez & David Perry - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 38 (1-2).
    Introduction to a collection of articles originally presented at a February 2001 conference hosted by the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics, Santa Clara University.
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  24.  17
    Natural Corporate Management: From the Big Bang to Wall Street, by William C. Frederick. Sheffield, UK: Greenleaf Publishing Limited, 2012. 272 Pp. ISBN: 978-1-9060-9380-8. [REVIEW]Manuel Velasquez - 2015 - Business Ethics Quarterly 25 (1):155-158.
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  25.  24
    Some Lessons and Nonlessons of Casuist History.Manuel G. Velasquez - 1994 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:184-195.
  26. Moral Reasoning.Manuel Velasquez - 2002 - In Norman E. Bowie (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Business Ethics. Blackwell. pp. 6--102.
     
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  27.  21
    Abstract.Manuel G. Velasquez - 1984 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 3 (2):69-69.
    Properly speaking, the corporation, considered as an entity distinct from its members, cannot be morally responsible for wrongful corporate acts. Setting aside (in this abstract) acts brought about through negligence or omissions, we may say that moral responsibility for an act attaches to that agent (or agents) in whom the act "originates" in this sense: (1) the agent formed the (mental) intention or plan to bring about that act (possibly with the help of others) and (2) the act was intentionally (...)
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  28.  3
    Guest Editors’ Introduction.Martin Calkins, Dennis J. Moberg, Manuel Velasquez & David Perry - 2000 - Professional Ethics, a Multidisciplinary Journal 8 (3-4):1-2.
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