Results for 'Maps'

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  1. Mental Maps.Ben Blumson - 2012 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (2):413-434.
    It's often hypothesized that the structure of mental representation is map-like rather than language-like. The possibility arises as a counterexample to the argument from the best explanation of productivity and systematicity to the language of thought hypothesis—the hypothesis that mental structure is compositional and recursive. In this paper, I argue that the analogy with maps does not undermine the argument, because maps and language have the same kind of compositional and recursive structure.
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  2. Maps and Absent Symbols.Ben Bronner - 2015 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 93 (1):43-59.
    ABSENCE is the claim that, if a symbol appears on a map, then absence of the symbol from some map coordinate signifies absence of the corresponding property from the corresponding location. This claim is highly intuitive and widely endorsed. And if it is true, then cartographic representation is strikingly different from linguistic representation. I argue, however, that ABSENCE is false of various maps and that we have no reason to believe it is true of any maps. The intuition (...)
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  3.  41
    Abstract Logics, Logic Maps, and Logic Homomorphisms.Steffen Lewitzka - 2007 - Logica Universalis 1 (2):243-276.
    . What is a logic? Which properties are preserved by maps between logics? What is the right notion for equivalence of logics? In order to give satisfactory answers we generalize and further develop the topological approach of [4] and present the foundations of a general theory of abstract logics which is based on the abstract concept of a theory. Each abstract logic determines a topology on the set of theories. We develop a theory of logic maps and show (...)
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  4.  45
    Investigating Phenomenal Consciousness: New Methodologies and Maps.Max Velmans (ed.) - 2000 - Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
    How can one investigate phenomenal consciousness? As in other areas of science, the investigation of consciousness aims for a more precise knowledge of its phenomena, and the discovery of general truths about their nature. This requires the development of appropriate first-person, second-person and third-person methods. This book introduces some of the creative ways in which these methods can be applied to different purposes, e.g. to understanding the relation of consciousness to brain, to examining or changing consciousness as such, and to (...)
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  5.  12
    On the Constructive Notion of Closure Maps.Mohammad Ardeshir & Rasoul Ramezanian - 2012 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 58 (4-5):348-355.
    Let A be a subset of the constructive real line. What are the necessary and sufficient conditions for the set A such that A is continuously separated from other reals, i.e., there exists a continuous function f with f−1 = A? In this paper, we study the notions of closed sets and closure maps in constructive reverse mathematics.
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  6.  6
    The Concepts of Time and Space Through the Lense of "Mental Maps".Gordana Djeric - 2004 - Filozofija I Društvo 24:127-147.
    The article explores the meaning and usages of "communicative and cultural memory" in the context of "mental maps". It looks particularly at theories which, on the basis of constructed symbolic divisions , connote a "lasting Balkan/European reality". The explication focuses on the content considered by these theories as specifically Balkan understanding of the concepts of Space and Time.
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  7. Models and Maps: An Essay on Epistemic Representation.Gabriele Contessa - 2013 - Carleton University.
    This book defends a two-tiered account of epistemic representation--the sort of representation relation that holds between representations such as maps and scientific models and their targets. It defends a interpretational account of epistemic representation and a structural similarity account of overall faithful epistemic representation.
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  8.  52
    A Theory of Causal Learning in Children: Causal Maps and Bayes Nets.Alison Gopnik, Clark Glymour, David M. Sobel, Laura E. Schulz, Tamar Kushnir & David Danks - 2004 - Psychological Review 111 (1):3-32.
    We propose that children employ specialized cognitive systems that allow them to recover an accurate “causal map” of the world: an abstract, coherent, learned representation of the causal relations among events. This kind of knowledge can be perspicuously understood in terms of the formalism of directed graphical causal models, or “Bayes nets”. Children’s causal learning and inference may involve computations similar to those for learning causal Bayes nets and for predicting with them. Experimental results suggest that 2- to 4-year-old children (...)
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  9.  28
    Representing Spatial Structure Through Maps and Language: Lord of the Rings Encodes the Spatial Structure of Middle Earth.Max M. Louwerse & Nick Benesh - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (8):1556-1569.
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  10. Representing Place Landscape Painting and Maps.Edward S. Casey - 2002 - University of Minnesota Press.
     
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  11.  6
    The Collaborative Dimensions of Argument Maps: A Socio-Visual Approach.Sabrina Bresciani & Martin J. Eppler - 2018 - Semiotica 2018 (220):199-216.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Semiotica Jahrgang: 2018 Heft: 220 Seiten: 199-216.
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  12.  10
    Siberia on Russian Mental Maps: The Imperial and National Space.Milan Subotic - 2012 - Filozofija I Društvo 23 (2):205-234.
    Starting from the theoretical problem of understanding the nation-building process within continental empires, this paper investigates the various meanings of ‘Siberia’ in the Russian imperial and national imagination. Analyzing discursive practices that create various representations of the geographical space, this study shows the changes in Russian perceptions of Siberia from the ‘alien’ space and the ‘colony’, to an unalienable part of the national territory . Tracing the creation of ‘Russianness’ of Siberia, the author interprets this concept as a part of (...)
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  13.  10
    Una Genealogía de Los Planos Históricos Del Fuerte San JoséA Genealogy of Historical Maps of Fuerte San José.Marcia Bianchi Villelli, Silvana Buscaglia & Bruno Sancci - 2013 - Corpus 3 (1).
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  14.  5
    Winner‐Relaxing and Winner‐Enhancing Kohonen Maps: Maximal Mutual Information From Enhancing the Winner.Jens Christian Claussen - 2003 - Complexity 8 (4):15-22.
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  15. Cognitive Maps and the Language of Thought.Michael Rescorla - 2009 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 60 (2):377-407.
    Fodor advocates a view of cognitive processes as computations defined over the language of thought (or Mentalese). Even among those who endorse Mentalese, considerable controversy surrounds its representational format. What semantically relevant structure should scientific psychology attribute to Mentalese symbols? Researchers commonly emphasize logical structure, akin to that displayed by predicate calculus sentences. To counteract this tendency, I discuss computational models of navigation drawn from probabilistic robotics. These models involve computations defined over cognitive maps, which have geometric rather than (...)
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  16. Thinking with Maps.Elisabeth Camp - 2007 - Philosophical Perspectives 21 (1):145–182.
    Most of us create and use a panoply of non-sentential representations throughout our ordinary lives: we regularly use maps to navigate, charts to keep track of complex patterns of data, and diagrams to visualize logical and causal relations among states of affairs. But philosophers typically pay little attention to such representations, focusing almost exclusively on language instead. In particular, when theorizing about the mind, many philosophers assume that there is a very tight mapping between language and thought. Some analyze (...)
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  17.  14
    A Categorical Equivalence Between Generalized Holonomy Maps on a Connected Manifold and Principal Connections on Bundles Over That Manifold.Sarita Rosenstock & James Owen Weatherall - 2016 - Journal of Mathematical Physics 57:102902.
    A classic result in the foundations of Yang-Mills theory, due to J. W. Barrett ["Holonomy and Path Structures in General Relativity and Yang-Mills Theory." Int. J. Th. Phys. 30, ], establishes that given a "generalized" holonomy map from the space of piece-wise smooth, closed curves based at some point of a manifold to a Lie group, there exists a principal bundle with that group as structure group and a principal connection on that bundle such that the holonomy map corresponds to (...)
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  18. Closures in ℵ0-Categorical Bilinear Maps.Andreas Baudisch - 2000 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 65 (2):914 - 922.
    It is possible to define a combinatorial closure on alternating bilinear maps with few relations similar to that in [2]. For the ℵ 0 - categorical case we show that this closure is part of the algebraic closure.
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  19. On the Relationship Between Cognitive Models and Spiritual Maps. Evidence From Hebrew Language Mysticism.Brian L. Lancaster - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (11-12):11-12.
    It is suggested that the impetus to generate models is probably the most fundamental point of connection between mysticism and psychology. In their concern with the relation between ‘unseen’ realms and the ‘seen’, mystical maps parallel cognitive models of the relation between ‘unconscious’ and ‘conscious’ processes. The map or model constitutes an explanation employing terms current within the respective canon. The case of language mysticism is examined to illustrate the premise that cognitive models may benefit from an understanding of (...)
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  20.  6
    Re-Approaching Fuzzy Cognitive Maps to Increase the Knowledge of a System.Vassiliki Mpelogianni & Peter P. Groumpos - 2018 - AI and Society 33 (2):175-188.
    Fuzzy cognitive maps is a system modeling methodology which applies mostly in complex dynamic systems by describing causal relationships that exist between its parameters called concepts. Fuzzy cognitive map theories have been used in many applications but they present several drawbacks and deficiencies. These limitations are addressed and analyzed fuzzy cognitive map theories are readdressed. A new novel approach in modelling fuzzy cognitive maps is proposed to increase the knowledge of the system and overcome some of its limitations. (...)
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  21. Causal Learning in Children: Causal Maps and Bayes Nets.Alison Gopnik, Clark Glymour, David M. Sobel & Laura E. Schultz - unknown
    We outline a cognitive and computational account of causal learning in children. We propose that children employ specialized cognitive systems that allow them to recover an accurate “causal map” of the world: an abstract, coherent representation of the causal relations among events. This kind of knowledge can be perspicuously represented by the formalism of directed graphical causal models, or “Bayes nets”. Human causal learning and inference may involve computations similar to those for learnig causal Bayes nets and for predicting with (...)
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  22. Maps in the Head and Maps in the Hand.David Kirsh, K. Skundergard & N. Dahlback - 2012 - Proceedings of the 34th Annual Cognitive Science Society.
    Using the perspective of situated cognition we studied how people interact with a physical map to help them navigate through an unfamiliar environment. The study used a mixture of cognitive ethnography and traditional experimental methods. We found that the difference between high and low performing navigators showed up in the speed they completed their task and also in the way they use maps. High performers plan routes using a survey method whereas low performers use a route strategy. We suggest (...)
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  23. Deflationary Metaphysics and the Natures of Maps.Sergio Sismondo & Nicholas Chrisman - 2001 - Proceedings of the Philosophy of Science Association 2001 (3):S38-.
    "Scientific theories are maps of the natural world." This metaphor is often used as part of a deflationary argument for a weak but relatively global version of scientific realism, a version that recognizes the place of conventions, goals, and contingencies in scientific representations, while maintaining that they are typically true in a clear and literal sense. By examining, in a naturalistic way, some relationships between maps and what they map, we question the scope and value of realist construals (...)
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  24.  6
    A Completeness Theorem for Open Maps.A. Joyal & I. Moerdijk - 1994 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 70 (1):51-86.
    This paper provides a partial solution to the completeness problem for Joyal's axiomatization of open and etale maps, under the additional assumption that a collection axiom holds.
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  25. Maps and Meaning.Ben Blumson - 2010 - Journal of Philosophical Research 35:123-128.
    It's possible to understand an infinite number of novel maps. I argue that Roberto Casati and Achille Varzi's compositional semantics of maps cannot explain this possibility, because it requires an infinite number of semantic primitives. So the semantics of maps is puzzlingly different from the semantics of language.
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  26.  62
    The Orientation of Cognitive Maps.Michael Palij, Marvin Levine & Tracey Kahan - 1984 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 22 (2):105-108.
    24 undergraduates were blindfolded and walked through paths laid out on a floor to investigate whether the orientation of Ss' cognitive maps (CMs) could be determined after they had learned a path by walking through it. Given the assumption that the CM is picturelike, it was predicted that it has a specific orientation, which implies that tests in which the CM is assumed to be aligned with the path should be less difficult than tests in which the CM is (...)
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  27.  16
    Cognitive Maps Assess News Viewer Ethical Sensitivity.Rebecca Ann Lind & David L. Rarick - 1997 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 12 (3):133 – 147.
    ~Et h i c a l sensitivity is investigated in an illustrative analysis of two female television nezos viewers. Transcripts of structured, in-depth interviews were analyzed according to four critical content dimensions of ethical sensitivity reflecting interviewees' mentions of story characteristics, ethical issues, consequences, and stakeholders. Cognitive maps illustrate the reasoning processes ofthe two viewers, one with relatively high and the other with relatively low ethical sensitivity. This study provides a detailed description of a new application of a research (...)
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  28.  53
    Structuralist Reduction Concepts as Structure-Preserving Maps.Thomas Mormann - 1988 - Synthese 77 (2):215 - 250.
    The aim of this paper is to characterize the various structuralist reduction concepts as structure-preserving maps in a succinct and unifying way. To begin with, some important intuitive adequacy conditions are discussed that a good (structuralist) reduction concept should satisfy. Having reconstructed these intuitive conditions in the structuralist framework, it turns out that they divide into two mutually incompatible sets of requirements. Accordingly there exist (at least) two essentially different types of structuralist reduction concepts: the first type stresses the (...)
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  29.  52
    A methodological model for studying the body in biographic research: Body Maps.Jimena Silva, Jaime Barrientos & Ricardo Espinoza-Tapia - 2013 - Alpha (Osorno) 37:163-182.
    En este artículo teórico se presenta el modelo metodológico de los Mapas Corporales como una estrategia para la producción de conocimientos sobre el cuerpo en investigaciones biográficas. Este modelo aborda la corporeidad como un lugar por el que fluye el trazado de construcciones intersubjetivas que regulan al sujeto, permitiendo textualizar procesos subjetivos que, con las estrategias tradicionales del método biográfico, quedan invisibles, en tanto, lenguajes semiótico-materiales encarnados. A nivel interpretativo se busca la comprensión del orden normativo inscrito en el cuerpo (...)
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  30.  34
    On Completely Positive Maps in Generalized Quantum Dynamics.Ralph F. Simmons Jr & James L. Park - 1981 - Foundations of Physics 11 (1-2):47-55.
    Several authors have hypothesized that completely positive maps should provide the means for generalizing quantum dynamics. In a critical analysis of that proposal, we show that such maps are incompatible with the standard phenomenological theory of spin relaxation and that the theoretical argument which has been offered as justification for the hypothesis is fallacious.
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  31.  2
    Squashed Entanglement, $$Mathbf {}$$-Extendibility, Quantum Marov Chains, and Recovery Maps.Ke Li & Andreas Winter - forthcoming - Foundations of Physics:1-15.
    Squashed entanglement :829–840, 2004) is a monogamous entanglement measure, which implies that highly extendible states have small value of the squashed entanglement. Here, invoking a recent inequality for the quantum conditional mutual information :575–611, 2015) greatly extended and simplified in various work since, we show the converse, that a small value of squashed entanglement implies that the state is close to a highly extendible state. As a corollary, we establish an alternative proof of the faithfulness of squashed entanglement. We briefly (...)
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  32.  16
    A Hierarchy of Maps Between Compacta.Paul Bankston - 1999 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 64 (4):1628-1644.
    Let CH be the class of compacta (i.e., compact Hausdorff spaces), with BS the subclass of Boolean spaces. For each ordinal α and pair $\langle K,L\rangle$ of subclasses of CH, we define Lev ≥α K,L), the class of maps of level at least α from spaces in K to spaces in L, in such a way that, for finite α, Lev ≥α (BS,BS) consists of the Stone duals of Boolean lattice embeddings that preserve all prenex first-order formulas of quantifier (...)
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  33.  20
    Maps and Monads for Modal Frames.Robert Goldblatt - 2006 - Studia Logica 83 (1-3):309-331.
    The category-theoretic nature of general frames for modal logic is explored. A new notion of "modal map" between frames is defined, generalizing the usual notion of bounded morphism/p-morphism. The category Fm of all frames and modal maps has reflective subcategories CHFm of compact Hausdorff frames, DFm of descriptive frames, and UEFm of ultrafilter enlargements of frames. All three subcategories are equivalent, and are dual to the category of modal algebras and their homomorphisms. An important example of a modal map (...)
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  34.  18
    Turing L -Machines and Recursive Computability for L -Maps.Giangiacomo Gerla - 1989 - Studia Logica 48 (2):179 - 192.
    We propose the notion of partial recursiveness and strong partial recursiveness for fuzzy maps. We prove that a fuzzy map f is partial recursive if and only if it is computable by a Turing fuzzy machine and that f is strongly partial recursive and deterministic if and only if it is computable via a deterministic Turing fuzzy machine. This gives a simple and manageable tool to investigate about the properties of the fuzzy machines.
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  35.  7
    The Field of Educational Leadership: Studying Maps and Mapping Studies.Helen Gunter & Peter Ribbins - 2003 - British Journal of Educational Studies 51 (3):254 - 281.
    The field of educational leadership is multi-site, in which those who study and practice leadership are located within networks which connect across institutions and sectors. Charting the growth of this dynamic field is the central purpose of this paper and six interconnected typologies of knowledge production are presented: Producers, Positions, Provinces, Practices, Processes and Perspectives. We argue that these typologies enable those involved to generate descriptions and understandings of the interplay between researching, theorising and practising in educational settings. This focus (...)
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  36.  27
    Does Evidence From Ethology Support Bicoded Cognitive Maps?Shane Zappettini & Colin Allen - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):570-571.
    The presumption that navigation requires a cognitive map leads to its conception as an abstract computational problem. Instead of loading the question in favor of an inquiry into the metric structure and evolutionary origin of cognitive maps, the task should first be to establish that a map-like representation actually is operative in real animals navigating real environments.
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  37.  26
    Maps, Languages, and Manguages: Rival Cognitive Architectures?Kent Johnson - 2015 - Philosophical Psychology 28 (6):815-836.
    Provided we agree about the thing, it is needless to dispute about the terms. —David Hume, A treatise of human nature, Book 1, section VIIMap-like representations are frequently invoked as an alternative type of representational vehicle to a language of thought. This view presupposes that map-systems and languages form legitimate natural kinds of cognitive representational systems. I argue that they do not, because the collections of features that might be taken as characteristic of maps or languages do not themselves (...)
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  38.  9
    The Accountability of Hand-Drawn Maps and Rendering Practices.Yutaka Kitazawa - 1999 - Human Studies 22 (2-4):299-314.
    This paper presents an ethnomethodological analysis of the representation of space in hand-drawn maps. The rendering practice of hand drawn maps includes some systematic devices by which real space is transformed into two-dimensional space on paper and a map is recognized as the map representing a certain space. In other words, members use these devices not only to trace real space but also to enable the recognition of space in a specific mode. The paper deals with three distinctive (...)
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  39.  50
    How Do Feature Maps Represent?Austen Clark - unknown
    Three different ways to understand the representational content of the feature maps employed in early vision are compared. First is Stephen Kosslyn's claim, entered as part of the debate over mental imagery, that such areas support "depictive" representation, and that visual perception uses them as depictive representations. Reasons are given to doubt this view. Second, an improved version of what I call "feature-placing" is described and advanced. Third, feature-placing is contrasted with the notion that the representational content of those (...)
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  40.  11
    Value Maps in Applied Ethics.Paul Thagard - 2015 - Teaching Ethics 15 (1):115-127.
    This paper describes the role in applied ethics of a new method of representing values using cognitive-affective maps. Value mapping has been used in two undergraduate courses in medical ethics and in environmental ethics. Students have found the method easy to use and also informative concerning the nature of ethical conflicts, and they often change their minds in the course of developing value maps.
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  41. Using and Understanding Maps.Stephen Butterfill - manuscript
    Many philosophers who advocate broadly pragmatist accounts of belief or language treat maps as paradigm examples of representation and they often assume that a pragmatic account of representation is obviously correct for maps (e.g. Dewey, Dretske, Millikan, Putnam and Ramsey). By examining mapping activities and the representational properties of maps in detail, this paper argues that no single notion of representation can fit every map or every mapping activity. This is bad news for pragmatists: if there are (...)
     
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  42.  25
    Cognitive Maps and Reflections on the Globalisation of the Mind.Singa Sandelin Benko - 1993 - World Futures 38 (1):171-189.
    (1993). Cognitive maps and reflections on the Globalisation of the mind. World Futures: Vol. 38, Theoretical Achievements and Practical Applications of General Evolutionary Theory, pp. 171-189.
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  43.  31
    Perception, Action Planning, and Cognitive Maps.Eric Chown, Lashon B. Booker & Stephen Kaplan - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):882-882.
    Perceptual learning mechanisms derived from Hebb's theory of cell assemblies can generate prototypic representations capable of extending the representational power of TEC (Theory of Event Coding) event codes. The extended capability includes categorization that accommodates “family resemblances” and problem solving that uses cognitive maps.
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  44.  26
    And the Natures of Maps.Nicholas Chrisman - unknown
    "Seienlil·ic theories are maps ol`lhc natural worlti." This metaphor is often used as part ot`a dellationary argument lor a weak but relatively global version ot` scienlitic realism. a version that recognizes the place olconventions, goals. and contingencies in seientilic rcpresentationsr while maintaining that they are typically true in a clear and literal sense. By examining. in a naturalistic wayt some relationships between maps and what they map. we question the scope and valttc oi` realist constrtials ol` maps (...)
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  45.  10
    The Rhetoric of Maps: International Law as a Discursive Tool in Visual Arguments.Christine Leuenberger - 2013 - Law and Ethics of Human Rights 7 (1):73-107.
    Notions of human rights as enshrined in international law have become the “idea of our time”; a “dominant moral narrative by which world politics” is organized; and a powerful “discourse of public persuasion.”1 With the rise of human rights discourse, we need to ask, how do protagonists make human rights claims? What sort of resources, techniques, and strategies do they use in order to publicize information about human rights abuses and stipulations set out in international law? With the democratization of (...)
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  46. Information Flow Between Weakly Interacting Lattices of Coupled Maps.Harald Atmanspacher - manuscript
    Weakly interacting lattices of coupled maps can be modeled as ordinary coupled map lattices separated from each other by boundary regions with small coupling parameters. We demonstrate that such weakly interacting lattices can nevertheless have unexpected and striking effects on each other. Under specific conditions, particular stability properties of the lattices are significantly influenced by their weak mutual interaction. This observation is tantamount to an efficacious information flow across the boundary.
     
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  47.  7
    Essay-Review of Christian's 'Maps of Time: An Introduction to Big History'. [REVIEW]Robert J. O'Hara - 2006 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 20 (1): 117–120.
    This well-written volume is an introduction, not to world history, but to the special genre of "Big History," as the subtitle indicates. Christian and his fellow big historians, reacting against popular scepticism toward "master narratives," seek to create a new class of grand works that incorporate not only the history of human society, but also of the Earth, its life, and the universe as a whole. Specialists in any of the fields covered by the volume may find rough spots in (...)
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  48.  15
    Colasanti's Pinna and Grossi's Aqvinvm Biblioteca di Geografia Storica. Vol. Ii. Pinna, by Giovanni Colasanti; Vol. Iii. Aquinum, by Eliseo Grossi. Loescher: Rome, 1907. 8vo. 2 Vols. Pp. (Viii), 125; (Vi), 210. 1 Plan; 2 Maps and 7 Illustrations in Text. Price 5 Lire; 8 Lire. [REVIEW]Thomas Ashby - 1909 - Classical Quarterly 3 (01):69-.
    Biblioteca di Geografia Storica. Vol. ii. Pinna, by Giovanni Colasanti; vol. iii. Aquinum, by Eliseo Grossi. Loescher: Rome, 1907. 8vo. 2 vols. Pp. , 125; , 210. 1 plan; 2 maps and 7 illustrations in text. Price 5 lire; 8 lire.
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  49.  12
    The Familiar and the Strange: Western Travelers' Maps of Europe and Asia, Ca. 1600-1800.Jordana Dym - 2004 - Philosophy and Geography 7 (2):155 – 191.
    Early Modern European travelers sought to gather and disseminate knowledge through narratives written for avid publishers and public. Yet not all travelers used the same tools to inform their readers. Despite a shared interest in conveying new knowledge based on eyewitness authority, Grand Tour accounts differed in an important respect from travelogues about Asia: they were less likely to include maps until the late eighteenth century. This paper examines why, using travel accounts published between 1600 and 1800 about Italy (...)
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  50.  11
    Elementary Axioms for Local Maps of Toposes.Steve Awodey & Lars Birkedal - unknown
    We present a complete elementary axiomatization of local maps of toposes.
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