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  1.  44
    Does promoting research advance planning in a general elderly population enhance completion of a research directive and proxies' predictive ability? a randomized controlled trial.Gina Bravo, Lise Trottier, Marie-France Dubois, Marcel Arcand, Danièle Blanchette, Anne-Marie Boire-Lavigne, Maryse Guay, Paule Hottin, Julie Lane, Suzanne Bellemare & Karen Painter - 2016 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 7 (3):183-192.
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  2.  66
    Promoting advance planning for health care and research among older adults: A randomized controlled trial.Gina Bravo, Marcel Arcand, Danièle Blanchette, Anne-Marie Boire-Lavigne, Marie-France Dubois, Maryse Guay, Paule Hottin, Julie Lane, Judith Lauzon & Suzanne Bellemare - 2012 - BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):1-13.
    Background: Family members are often required to act as substitute decision-makers when health care or research participation decisions must be made for an incapacitated relative. Yet most families are unable to accurately predict older adult preferences regarding future health care and willingness to engage in research studies. Discussion and documentation of preferences could improve proxies' abilities to decide for their loved ones. This trial assesses the efficacy of an advance planning intervention in improving the accuracy of substitute decision-making and increasing (...)
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  3.  17
    Making medical decisions for an incompetent older adult when both a proxy and an advance directive are available: which is more likely to reflect the older adult’s preferences?Gina Bravo, Modou Sene & Marcel Arcand - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (7):498-503.
    ObjectivesTo investigate which of two sources of information about an older adult’s wishes—choices made in an advance directive or proxy’s opinion—provides better insight into the older adult’s preferences measured in hypothetical clinical situations involving decisional incapacity.MethodsSecondary analyses of data collected from 157 community-dwelling, decisionally competent adults aged 70 years and over who attended a group information session on advance directives with their proxy. Older adults were invited to complete a directive introduced during the session, designed to express healthcare preferences. An (...)
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  4.  6
    Attitudes toward withholding antibiotics from people with dementia lacking decisional capacity: findings from a survey of Canadian stakeholders.Lise Trottier, Marcel Arcand, Jocelyn Downie, Lieve Van den Block & Gina Bravo - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-11.
    BackgroundHealthcare professionals and surrogate decision-makers often face the difficult decision of whether to initiate or withhold antibiotics from people with dementia who have developed a life-threatening infection after losing decisional capacity.MethodsWe conducted a vignette-based survey among 1050 Quebec stakeholders (senior citizens, family caregivers, nurses and physicians; response rate 49.4%) to (1) assess their attitudes toward withholding antibiotics from people with dementia lacking decisional capacity; (2) compare attitudes between dementia stages and stakeholder groups; and (3) investigate other correlates of attitudes, including (...)
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  5.  42
    Translation and cross-cultural adaptation of a family booklet on comfort care in dementia: sensitive topics revised before implementation.Jenny T. van der Steen, Cees M. P. M. Hertogh, Tjomme de Graas, Miharu Nakanishi, Franco Toscani & Marcel Arcand - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (2):104-109.
    Introduction Families of patients with dementia may need support in difficult end-of-life decision making. Such guidance may be culturally sensitive. Methods To support families in Canada, a booklet was developed to aid decision making on palliative care issues. For reasons of cost effectiveness and promising effects, we prepared for its implementation in Italy, the Netherlands and Japan. Local teams translated and adapted the booklet to local ethical, legal and medical standards where needed, retaining guidance on palliative care. Using qualitative content (...)
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