13 found
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  1. Fake news, conspiracy theorizing, and intellectual vice.Marco Meyer & Mark Alfano - 2022 - In Mark Alfano, Colin Klein & Jeroen de Ridder (eds.), Social Virtue Epistemology. Routledge.
    Across two studies, one of which was pre-registered, we find that a simple questionnaire that measures intellectual virtue and vice predicts how many fake news articles and conspiracy theories participants accept. This effect holds even when controlling for multiple demographic predictors, including age, household income, sex, education, ethnicity, political affiliation, religion, and news consumption. These results indicate that self-report is an adequate way to measure intellectual virtue and vice, which suggests that they are not fully immune to introspective awareness or (...)
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  2.  55
    The Development and Validation of the Epistemic Vice Scale.Marco Meyer, Mark Alfano & Boudewijn de Bruin - forthcoming - Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-28.
    This paper presents two studies on the development and validation of a ten-item scale of epistemic vice and the relationship between epistemic vice and misinformation and fake news. Epistemic vices have been defined as character traits that interfere with acquiring, maintaining, and transmitting knowledge. Examples of epistemic vice are gullibility and indifference to knowledge. It has been hypothesized that epistemically vicious people are especially susceptible to misinformation and conspiracy theories. We conducted one exploratory and one confirmatory observational survey study on (...)
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  3. Epistemic vice predicts acceptance of Covid-19 misinformation.Marco Meyer, Mark Alfano & Boudewijn De Bruin - manuscript
    Why are mistaken beliefs about Covid-19 so prevalent? Political identity, education and other demographic variables explain only a part of individual differences in the susceptibility to Covid-19 misinformation. This paper focuses on another explanation: epistemic vice. Epistemic vices are character traits that interfere with acquiring, maintaining, and transmitting knowledge. If the basic assumption of vice epistemology is right, then people with epistemic vices such as indifference to the truth or rigidity in their belief structures will tend to be more susceptible (...)
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  4. The Right to Credit.Marco Meyer - 2017 - Journal of Political Philosophy 26 (3):304-326.
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  5.  12
    Harming by Deceit: Epistemic Malevolence and Organizational Wrongdoing.Marco Meyer & Chun Wei Choo - 2023 - Journal of Business Ethics 189 (3):439-452.
    Research on organizational epistemic vice alleges that some organizations are epistemically malevolent, i.e. they habitually harm others by deceiving them. Yet, there is a lack of empirical research on epistemic malevolence. We connect the discussion of epistemic malevolence to the empirical literature on organizational deception. The existing empirical literature does not pay sufficient attention to the impact of an organization’s ability to control compromising information on its deception strategy. We address this gap by studying eighty high-penalty corporate misconduct cases between (...)
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  6.  35
    The epistemic vices of corporations.Marco Meyer - 2023 - Synthese 201 (5):1-22.
    Vice epistemology studies the qualities of individuals and collectives that undermine the creation, sharing, and storing of knowledge. There is no settled understanding of which epistemic vices exist at the collective level. Yet understanding which collective epistemic vices exist is important, both to facilitate research on the antecedents and effects of collective epistemic vice, and to advance philosophical discussions such as whether some collective epistemic vices are genuinely collective. I propose an empirical approach to identifying epistemic vices in corporations, analyzing (...)
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  7.  40
    Tax Competition and Global Interdependence.Mathias Risse & Marco Meyer - 2019 - Journal of Political Philosophy 27 (4):480-498.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  8.  32
    Tax Competition and Global Interdependence.Mathias Risse & Marco Meyer - 2019 - Journal of Political Philosophy 27 (4):480-498.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  9.  23
    Justice and Housing.Daniel Halliday & Marco Meyer - 2024 - Philosophy Compass 19 (3):e12966.
    This article surveys various topics that link questions about housing with considerations of economic justice. Housing has received increasing attention from philosophers within the last decade. In political philosophy, some aspects of a topic attract more attention than others. Presently, philosophical reflection focuses on the value of a home; homelessness; gentrification; segregation; and spatial justice, with a substantial body of literature developing on these interconnected themes. We highlight some of the recent contributions to the field of housing justice while also (...)
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  10.  7
    Epistemic vice predicts acceptance of Covid-19 misinformation.Marco Meyer, Mark Alfano & Boudewijn de Bruin - 2024 - Episteme 21 (1):207-228.
    Why are mistaken beliefs about COVID-19 so prevalent? Political identity, education and other demographic variables explain only part of the differences between people in their susceptibility to COVID-19 misinformation. This paper focuses on another explanation: epistemic vice. Epistemic vices are character traits that interfere with acquiring, maintaining, and transmitting knowledge. If the basic assumption of vice epistemology is right, then people with epistemic vices such as indifference to the truth or rigidity in their belief structures will tend to be more (...)
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  11.  27
    The Ethics of Consumer Credit: Balancing Wrongful Inclusion and Wrongful Exclusion.Marco Meyer - 2018 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 42 (1):294-313.
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  12.  6
    Organisational integrity as an epistemic virtue.Marco Meyer - 2024 - In Muel Kaptein (ed.), Research Handbook on Organisation Integrity. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing. pp. 377–392.
    Integrity is often conceived as a moral virtue that pertains to the coherence between one’s moral convictions and actions, as well as consistency in convictions over time. By contrast, I argue that integrity is primarily an epistemic virtue. To act with integrity, an individual or organisation must engage in responsible inquiry; that is, the collection, processing, sharing, and storage of information in ways that promote truth. Organisational structures such as division of labour and hierarchy present challenges to responsible inquiry, thereby (...)
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  13.  13
    Dealing fairly with trade imbalances in monetary unions.Marco Meyer - 2021 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 20 (1):45-66.
    Politicians around the globe wrangle about how to deal with trade imbalances. In the Eurozone, members running a trade deficit accuse members running a surplus of forcing them into deficit. Yet pol...
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