8 found
Order:
  1.  9
    Which Words Are Most Iconic?Bodo Winter, Marcus Perlman, Lynn K. Perry & Gary Lupyan - 2017 - Interaction Studies 18 (3):443-464.
    Some spoken words are iconic, exhibiting a resemblance between form and meaning. We used native speaker ratings to assess the iconicity of 3001 English words, analyzing their iconicity in relation to part-of-speech differences and differences between the sensory domain they relate to. First, we replicated previous findings showing that onomatopoeia and interjections were highest in iconicity, followed by verbs and adjectives, and then nouns and grammatical words. We further show that words with meanings related to the senses are more iconic (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  2.  4
    Vision Dominates in Perceptual Language: English Sensory Vocabulary is Optimized for Usage.Bodo Winter, Marcus Perlman & Asifa Majid - 2018 - Cognition 179:213-220.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3.  10
    Which Words Are Most Iconic?Bodo Winter, Marcus Perlman, Lynn K. Perry & Gary Lupyan - 2017 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 18 (3):443-464.
    Some spoken words are iconic, exhibiting a resemblance between form and meaning. We used native speaker ratings to assess the iconicity of 3001 English words, analyzing their iconicity in relation to part-of-speech differences and differences between the sensory domain they relate to. First, we replicated previous findings showing that onomatopoeia and interjections were highest in iconicity, followed by verbs and adjectives, and then nouns and grammatical words. We further show that words with meanings related to the senses are more iconic (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4.  14
    Iconic Prosody in Story Reading.Marcus Perlman, Nathaniel Clark & Marlene Johansson Falck - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (6):1348-1368.
    Recent experiments have shown that people iconically modulate their prosody corresponding with the meaning of their utterance. This article reports findings from a story reading task that expands the investigation of iconic prosody to abstract meanings in addition to concrete ones. Participants read stories that contrasted along concrete and abstract semantic dimensions of speed and size. Participants read fast stories at a faster rate than slow stories, and big stories with a lower pitch than small stories. The effect of speed (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  5.  7
    Debunking Two Myths Against Vocal Origins of Language.Marcus Perlman - 2017 - Interaction Studies 18 (3):376-401.
    Gesture-first theories of language origins often raise two unsubstantiated arguments against vocal origins. First, they argue that great ape vocal behavior is highly constrained, limited to a fixed, species-typical repertoire of reflexive calls. Second, they argue that vocalizations lack any significant potential to ground meaning through iconicity, or resemblance between form and meaning. This paper reviews the considerable evidence that debunks these two “myths”. Accumulating evidence shows that the great apes exercise voluntary control over their vocal behavior, including their breathing (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  46
    Language Understanding is Grounded in Experiential Simulations: A Response to Weiskopf.Raymond W. Gibbs & Marcus Perlman - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (3):305-308.
    Several disciplines within the cognitive sciences have advanced the idea that people comprehend the actions of others, including the linguistic meanings they communicate, through embodied simulations where they imaginatively recreate the actions they observe or hear about. This claim has important consequences for theories of mind and meaning, such as that people’s use and interpretation of language emerges as a kind of bodily activity that is an essential part of ordinary cognition. Daniel Weiskopf presents several arguments against the idea that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  7.  7
    Iconicity in Signed and Spoken Vocabulary: A Comparison Between American Sign Language, British Sign Language, English, and Spanish.Marcus Perlman, Hannah Little, Bill Thompson & Robin L. Thompson - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  5
    Physical Mechanisms May Be as Important as Brain Mechanisms in Evolution of Speech.Bart de Boer & Marcus Perlman - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (6):552-553.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark