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Margaret Boone Rappaport
Ohio State University (PhD)
  1.  93
    Visions of a Martian Future.Konrad Szocik, Steven Abood, Chris Impey, Mark Shelhamer, Jacob Haqq-Misra, Erik Persson, Lluis Oviedo, Klara Anna Capova, Martin Braddock, Margaret Boone Rappaport & Christopher Corbally - 2020 - Futures 117.
    As we look beyond our terrestrial boundary to a multi-planetary future for humankind, it becomes paramount to anticipate the challenges of various human factors on the most likely scenario for this future: permanent human settlement of Mars. Even if technical hurdles are circumvented to provide adequate resources for basic physiological and psychological needs, Homo sapiens will not survive on an alien planet if a dysfunctional psyche prohibits the utilization of these resources. No matter how far we soar into the stars, (...)
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  2.  44
    Matrix Thinking: An Adaptation at the Foundation of Human Science, Religion, and Art.Margaret Boone Rappaport & Christopher Corbally - 2015 - Zygon 50 (1):84-112.
    Intrigued by Robinson and Southgate's 2010 work on “entering a semiotic matrix,” we expand their model to include the juxtaposition of all signs, symbols, and mental categories, and to explore the underpinnings of creativity in science, religion, and art. We rely on an interdisciplinary review of human sentience in archaeology, evolutionary biology, the cognitive science of religion, and literature, and speculate on the development of sentience in response to strong selection pressure on the hominin evolutionary line, leaving us the “lone (...)
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  3.  21
    Human Phenotypic Morality and the Biological Basis for Knowing Good.Margaret Boone Rappaport & Christopher Corbally - 2017 - Zygon 52 (3):822-846.
    Co-creating knowledge takes a new approach to human phenotypic morality as a biologically based, human lineage specific trait. Authors from very different backgrounds first review research on the nature and origins of morality using the social brain network, and studies of individuals who cannot “know good” or think morally because of brain dysfunction. They find these models helpful but insufficient, and turn to paleoanthropology, cognitive science, and neuroscience to understand human moral capacity and its origins long ago, in the genus (...)
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  4.  32
    Evolution of Religious Capacity in the Genus Homo: Cognitive Time Sequence.Margaret Boone Rappaport & Christopher Corbally - 2018 - Zygon 53 (1):159-197.
    Intrigued by the possible paths that the evolution of religious capacity may have taken, the authors identify a series of six major building blocks that form a foundation for religious capacity in genus Homo. Homo neanderthalensis and Homo sapiens idaltu are examined for early signs of religious capacity. Then, after an exploration of human plasticity and why it is so important, the analysis leads to a final building block that characterizes only Homo sapiens sapiens, beginning 200,000–400,000 years ago, when all (...)
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  5.  12
    The Human Hearth and the Dawn of Morality.Margaret Boone Rappaport & Christopher Corbally - 2016 - Zygon 51 (4):835-866.
    Stunned by the implications of Colagè's analysis of the cultural activation of the brain's Visual Word Form Area and the potential role of cultural neural reuse in the evolution of biology and culture, the authors build on his work in proposing a context for the first rudimentary hominin moral systems. They cross-reference six domains: neuroscience on sleep, creativity, plasticity, and the Left Hemisphere Interpreter; palaeobiology; cognitive science; philosophy; traditional archaeology; and cognitive archaeology's theories on sleep changes in Homo erectus and (...)
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  6.  30
    Evolution of Religious Capacity in the Genus Homo: Trait Complexity in Action Through Compassion.Margaret Boone Rappaport & Christopher Corbally - 2018 - Zygon 53 (1):198-239.
    In this third and last article on the evolution of religious capacity, the authors focus on compassion, one of religious expression's common companions. They explore the various meanings of compassion, using Biblical and early related documents, and derive general cognitive components before an evolutionary analysis of compassion using their model. Then, in taking on neural reuse theory, they adapt a model from linguistics theory to understand how neural reuse could have operated to fix religious capacity in the human genome. They (...)
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  7.  19
    Evolution of Religious Capacity in the Genus Homo: Origins and Building Blocks.Margaret Boone Rappaport & Christopher Corbally - 2018 - Zygon 53 (1):123-158.
    The large, ancient ape population of the Miocene reached across Eurasia and down into Africa. From this genetically diverse group, the chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas, and humans evolved from populations of successively reduced size. Using the findings of genomics, population genetics, cognitive science, neuroscience, and archaeology, the authors construct a theoretical framework of evolutionary innovations without which religious capacity could not have emerged as it did. They begin with primate sociality and strength from a basic ape model, and then explore how (...)
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  8.  27
    Teaching Science and Religion in the Twenty‐First Century: The Many Pedagogical Roles of Christopher Southgate.Christopher Corbally & Margaret Boone Rappaport - 2018 - Zygon 53 (3):897-908.
    With the goal of understanding how Christopher Southgate communicates his in-depth knowledge of both science and theology, we investigated the many roles he assumes as a teacher. We settled upon wide-ranging topics that all intertwine: (1) his roles as author and coordinating editor of a premier textbook on science and theology, now in its third edition; (2) his oral presentations worldwide, including plenaries, workshops, and short courses; and (3) the team teaching approach itself, which is often needed by others because (...)
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  9.  42
    Tracing Origins of Twenty‐First Century Ecotheology: The Poetry of Christopher Southgate.Margaret Boone Rappaport & Christopher Corbally - 2018 - Zygon 53 (3):866-875.
    With the goal of better understanding how science, religion, and poetic art came together in the work of Christopher Southgate, the authors first explore his spiritual poetry. They come away with a better understanding of the author’s commitment to a broad naturalism that contributes, along with his own faith experience, to his prose works in the emerging field of ecotheology. The authors conclude that Southgate’s work is part of the worldwide emergence of a theological rationale that supports environmentalism, the protection (...)
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  10.  8
    How an Advanced Neurocognitive Human Trait for Religious Capacity Fails to Form.Margaret Boone Rappaport & Christopher Corbally - 2019 - Studia Humana 8 (1):49-66.
    The authors present an evolutionary model for the biological emergence of religious capacity as an advanced neurocognitive trait. Using their model for the stages leading to the evolutionary emergence of religious capacity in Homo sapiens, they analyze the mechanisms that can fail, leading to unbelief. The analysis identifies some, but not all types of atheists and agnostics, so they turn their question around and, using the same evolutionary model, ask what keeps religion going. Why does its development not fail in (...)
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  11.  2
    Program Planning for a Mars Hardship Post: Social, Psychological, and Spiritual Services.Margaret Boone Rappaport & Christopher Corbally - 2019 - In Konrad Szocik (ed.), The Human Factor in a Mission to Mars: An Interdisciplinary Approach. New York: Springer.
    Human services planning for crews who go to Mars is in its earliest phase, but the modalities for service delivery are well worth anticipating because they could involve some of the first innovations that merge physical, biological, and digital capacities on the new planet. This chapter examines the constraints of the planet Mars, itself, on all humans. It anticipates how “exogenous stressors” might affect the psychological, social, and cultural capacities and conflicts of the earliest crews. Several types of service modalities (...)
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  12. Normalizing the Paradigm on Human Enhancements in Space.Margaret Boone Rappaport & Christopher Corbally - 2020 - In Human Enhancements for Space Missions; Lunar, Martian, and Future Missions to the Outer Planets. New York, NY, USA: pp. 3-17.
    The authors describe the context and need for, and three methods to achieve a paradigm normalization in space research and space programming for the coming changes to the human species wrought by human enhancements. They explore the relevance of the longstanding nature of human enhancements, which reach back into prehistory, and new future capacities that will render humans able to withstand the rigors of microgravity, the monotony of spaceflight, and the extremes of off-world environments. The authors draw together a wide (...)
     
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  13.  15
    The Emergence of Religion in Human Evolution.Margaret Boone Rappaport & Christopher J. Corbally - 2020 - Abingdon, UK: Routledge.
    Religious capacity is a highly elaborate, neurocognitive human trait that has a solid evolutionary foundation. This book uses a multidisciplinary approach to describe millions of years of biological innovations that eventually give rise to the modern trait and its varied expression in humanity’s many religions. The authors present a scientific model and a central thesis that the brain organs, networks, and capacities that allowed humans to survive physically also gave our species the ability to create theologies, find sustenance in religious (...)
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