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Margaret Brazier [19]Margaret R. Brazier [1]
  1.  22
    Not so new directions in the law of consent? Examining Montgomery v Lanarkshire Health Board.Anne Maree Farrell & Margaret Brazier - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (2):85-88.
  2.  56
    Respecting the Living Means Respecting the Dead too.Sheelagh McGuinness & Margaret Brazier - 2008 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 28 (2):297-316.
    Why should we respect the wishes which individuals may have about how their body is treated after death? Reflecting on how and why the law respects the bodies of the living, we argue that we must also respect the ‘dead’. We contest the relevance of the argument ‘the dead have no interests’, rather we think that the pertinent argument is ‘the living have interests in what happens to their dead bodies’. And, we advance arguments why we should also respect the (...)
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  3.  4
    Protecting the Vulnerable: Autonomy and Consent in Health Care.Margaret Brazier & Mary Lobjoit (eds.) - 1991 - New York: Routledge.
    The right of adults with sound mind to consent to treatment or risk their own health for the benefit of the community in a clinical trial is unequivocally recognised by the law. But what about those vulnerable by virtue of their age, nature or position in society? Experts from the fields of medicine, philosophy, theology and law, explore the ethical and legal principles which seek to reconcile the individual's right to autonomy with the need to protect vulnerable groups. Discussions refer (...)
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  4. Protecting the vulnerable: autonomy and consent in health care.Margaret Brazier & Mary Lobjoit (eds.) - 1991 - New York: Routledge.
    Protecting the Vulnerable explores the reality of patient control and choice in health care and analyzes how decisions should be made on behalf of those deemed incapable of making decisions. The contributors, distinguished experts from the disciplines of medicine, ethics, theology, and law, look at the complex problem of autonomy and consent in health care and clinical research today from an illuminating perspective--its impact on the vulnerable members of society. The essays move from the exploration of lingering paternalism in health (...)
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  5.  6
    Protecting the Vulnerable: Autonomy and Consent in Health Care.Margaret Brazier & Mary Lobjoit (eds.) - 1991 - New York: Routledge.
    The right of adults with sound mind to consent to treatment or risk their own health for the benefit of the community in a clinical trial is unequivocally recognised by the law. But what about those vulnerable by virtue of their age, nature or position in society? Experts from the fields of medicine, philosophy, theology and law, explore the ethical and legal principles which seek to reconcile the individual's right to autonomy with the need to protect vulnerable groups. Discussions refer (...)
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  6. Helping doctors become better doctors: Mary Lobjoit—an unsung heroine of medical ethics in the UK.Margaret R. Brazier, Raanan Gillon & John Harris - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (6):383-385.
    Medical Ethics has many unsung heros and heroines. Here we celebrate one of these and on telling part of her story hope to place modern medical ethics and bioethics in the UK more centrally within its historical and human contex.
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  7. Deceased organ donation: In praise of pragmatism.Margaret Brazier & Muireann Quigley - 2007 - Clinical Ethics 2 (4):164-165.
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  8. Body parts and baleful stars?Margaret Brazier & Alexandra Mullock - 2022 - In G. T. Laurie, E. S. Dove & Niamh Nic Shuibhne (eds.), Law and legacy in medical jurisprudence: essays in honour of Graeme Laurie. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
     
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  9.  6
    Commentary on" Who Should be Committable?".Margaret Brazier - 1995 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 2 (1):49-50.
  10. Editorial: Letting Babies Die.Margaret Brazier & David Archard - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
     
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  11. Fiduciary Relationship: An Ethical Approach and a Legal Concept?Margaret Brazier & Mary Lobjoit - 2001 - In Rebecca Bennett & Charles A. Erin (eds.), Hiv and Aids, Testing, Screening, and Confidentiality. Clarendon Press.
     
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  12. Human tissue : a story from a small state.Margaret Brazier & Sheila McLean - 2019 - In Alastair V. Campbell, Voo Teck Chuan, Richard Huxtable & N. S. Peart (eds.), Healthcare ethics, law and professionalism: essays on the works of Alastair V. Campbell. New York, NY: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.
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  13.  23
    Teaching medical ethics symposium. Medical ethics in Manchester.Margaret Brazier - 1987 - Journal of Medical Ethics 13 (3):150-152.
    Manchester's multi-disciplinary approach to medical ethics combines established methods and new initiatives. There is a longstanding Medical Group and also, plans are evolving for the inclusion of medical ethics teaching in the undergraduate curriculum, the start of an MA in Health Care Ethics in October 1987 and the establishment of the Centre for Social Ethics and Policy to act as a focus within the university for research and study in a wider context.
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  14. The age of deference-a historical anomaly.Margaret Brazier - 2008 - In Michael D. A. Freeman (ed.), Law and Bioethics / Edited by Michael Freeman. Oxford University Press.
     
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  15.  54
    Unfinished feticide: a legal commentary.Margaret Brazier - 1990 - Journal of Medical Ethics 16 (2):68-70.
    Jansen expresses concern as to the legal implications of both selective reduction of pregnancy and unsuccessful attempts at termination of pregnancy using mifepristone. This commentary examines the legality of both procedures and concludes that Jansen is over-optimistic in his belief that neither procedure is likely to fall foul of the criminal laws on induced abortion. By contrast his anxieties about civil liability arising from the subsequent live birth of a damaged infant are, it is suggested, unnecessarily pessimistic. Such an action (...)
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  16.  31
    Why we wrote... Medicine, Patients and the Law.Margaret Brazier & Emma Cave - 2008 - Clinical Ethics 3 (4):205-208.
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  17.  23
    Guest editorial: a tribute to the Very Reverend Edward Shotter.Raanan Gillon, Kenneth Boyd, Margaret Brazier, Alastair Campbell, Andrew Goddard, Wing May Kong, Sylvia Limerick, Stephen Lock & Jonathan Montgomery - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (10):629-630.
    We wish to describe and acknowledge the exceptional contributions to medical ethics, both in the UK and internationally, made by Edward Shotter1 who died at home on 3 July 2019. He was founder of the London Medical Group2 3 and instigator of similar student-led medical ethics groups throughout the UK; founder of the Institute of Medical Ethics4 and founder of the Journal of Medical Ethics. Ted Shotter transformed the study of medical ethics in the UK in the interests of patients (...)
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  18.  11
    Paper: Healthcare scandals in the NHS: crime and punishment.Amel Alghrani, Margaret Brazier, Anne-Maree Farrell, Danielle Griffiths & Neil Allen - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (4):230-232.
    The Francis Report into failures of care at Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust Hospital documented a series of ‘shocking’ systematic failings in healthcare that left patients routinely neglected, humiliated and in pain as the Trust focused on cutting costs and hitting government targets. At present, the criminal law in England plays a limited role in calling healthcare professionals to account for failures in care. Normally, only if a gross error leads to death will a doctor or nurse face the prospect (...)
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