23 found
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Margaret Graver [20]Margaret R. Graver [3]Margaret Robson Graver [1]
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Margaret Graver
Dartmouth College
  1.  12
    Seneca: the literary philosopher.Margaret Graver - 2023 - New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press.
    Seneca stands apart from other philosophers of Greece and Rome not only for his interest in practical ethics, but also for the beauty and liveliness of his writing. These twelve in-depth essays take up a series of interrelated topics in his works, from his relation to Stoicism, Epicureanism, and other schools of thought; to the psychology of emotion and action and the management of anger and grief; to letter-writing, gift-giving, friendship, and kindness; to Seneca's innovative use of genre, style, and (...)
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  2.  25
    Cicero on the Emotions: Tusculan Disputations 3 and 4.Margaret R. Graver (ed.) - 2002 - University of Chicago Press.
    The third and fourth books of Cicero's _Tusculan Disputations_ deal with the nature and management of human emotion: first grief, then the emotions in general. In lively and accessible style, Cicero presents the insights of Greek philosophers on the subject, reporting the views of Epicureans and Peripatetics and giving a detailed account of the Stoic position, which he himself favors for its close reasoning and moral earnestness. Both the specialist and the general reader will be fascinated by the Stoics' analysis (...)
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  3.  26
    Philo of alexandria and the origins of the stoic O.Margaret Graver - 1999 - Phronesis 44 (4):300-325.
    The concept of o or "pre-emotions" is known not only to the Roman Stoics and Christian exegetes but also to Philo of Alexandria. Philo also supplies the term o at QGen 1.79. As Philo cannot have derived what he knows from Seneca (despite his visit to Rome in 39), nor from Cicero, who also mentions the point, he must have found it in older Stoic writings. The o concept, rich in implications for the voluntariness and phenomenology of the passions proper, (...))
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  4. Stoicism & emotion.Margaret Graver - 2007 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    On the surface, stoicism and emotion seem like contradictory terms. Yet the Stoic philosophers of ancient Greece and Rome were deeply interested in the emotions, which they understood as complex judgments about what we regard as valuable in our surroundings. Stoicism and Emotion shows that they did not simply advocate an across-the-board suppression of feeling, as stoicism implies in today’s English, but instead conducted a searching examination of these powerful psychological responses, seeking to understand what attitude toward them expresses the (...)
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  5. Dog-Helen and homeric insult.Margaret Graver - 1995 - Classical Antiquity 14 (1):41-61.
    Helen's self-disparagement is an anomaly in epic diction, and this is especially true of those instances where she refers to herself as "dog" and "dog-face." This essay attempts to show that Helen's dog-language, in that it remains in conflict with other features of her characterization, has some generic significance for epic, helping to establish the superiority of epic performance over competing performance types which treated her differently. The metaphoric use of χύων and its derivatives has not been well understood: the (...)
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  6.  36
    Philo of Alexandria and the Origins of the Stoic Πρoπαειαι.Margaret Graver - 1999 - Phronesis 44 (4):300-325.
    The concept of πρoπαειαι or "pre-emotions" is known not only to the Roman Stoics and Christian exegetes but also to Philo of Alexandria. Philo also supplies the term πρoπαεια at QGen 1.79. As Philo cannot have derived what he knows from Seneca, nor from Cicero, who also mentions the point, he must have found it in older Stoic writings. The πρoπαεια concept, rich in implications for the voluntariness and phenomenology of the passions proper, is thus confirmed for the Hellenistic period. (...)
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  7. Not Even Zeus: A Discussion of A. A. Long, Epictetus: A Stoic and Socratic Guide to Life.Margaret Graver - 2003 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 24:345-361.
     
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  8.  47
    Managing Mental Pain: Epicurus Vs. Aristippus on the Pre-Rehearsal of Future Ills.Margaret Graver - 2002 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 17 (1):155-184.
  9. Philo of Alexandria and the Origins of the Stoic Prop‹ yeiai.Margaret Graver - 1999 - Phronesis 44:4.
  10.  1
    Honeybee Reading and Self-Scripting: Epistulae Morales 84.Margaret R. Graver - 2014 - In Jula Wildberger & Marcia L. Colish (eds.), Seneca Philosophus. De Gruyter. pp. 269-294.
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  11.  25
    The Eye of the Beholder: Perceptual Relativity in Lucretius.Margaret Graver - 1990 - Apeiron 23 (4):91-116.
    Examines Lucretius ' solution to the problem of perceptual relativity that was posed by ancient skeptics as a challenge to the possibility of knowledge based on the senses. The solution, having to do with differences among individuals in the ' pores ' through which effluences enter the body, is fundamental to Lucretius ' Epicurean epistemology. There are interesting problems, however, with some of the cases, and it is also interesting to note the disturbing element of violence in Lucretius ' description (...)
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  12.  19
    The Manhandling of Maecenas: Senecan Abstractions of Masculinity.Margaret Graver - 1998 - American Journal of Philology 119 (4):607-632.
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  13.  13
    Power and persuasion in Cicero's philosophy.Nathan Gilbert, Margaret Graver & Sean McConnell (eds.) - 2022 - New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press.
    This interdisciplinary volume will be essential reading for students and scholars working on Greco-Roman philosophy, Roman rhetoric, and the history and literary culture of the Roman Republic. It showcases innovative methodological approaches to Cicero the philosopher and defines new directions for the immediate future of the field.
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  14.  16
    Commentary on Inwood.Margaret Graver - 1999 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 15 (1):44-56.
  15.  40
    Epictetus.Margaret Graver - 2009 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  16. The mouse, the moneybox, and the six-footed scurrying Solecism : satire and riddles in Seneca's letters.Margaret Graver - 2019 - In Pierre Destrée & Franco V. Trivigno (eds.), Laughter, Humor, and Comedy in Ancient Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
     
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  17.  7
    CICERO'S INTELLECTUAL MANIFESTO - (J.E.G.) Zetzel The Lost Republic. Cicero's De oratore_ and _De re publica. Pp. xii + 367. New York: Oxford University Press, 2022. Cased, £64, US$99. ISBN: 978-0-19-762609-2. [REVIEW]Margaret R. Graver - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-3.
  18.  8
    Seneca. [REVIEW]Margaret Graver - 2006 - Ancient Philosophy 26 (1):221-226.
  19.  38
    Seneca. [REVIEW]Margaret Graver - 2006 - Ancient Philosophy 26 (1):221-226.
  20.  49
    Emotion and Peace of Mind. [REVIEW]Margaret Graver - 2002 - Ancient Philosophy 22 (1):225-234.
  21.  10
    Emotion and Peace of Mind. [REVIEW]Margaret Graver - 2002 - Ancient Philosophy 22 (1):225-234.
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  22.  30
    Letters of Seneca (F.R.) Berno (ed., trans.) L. Anneo Seneca. Lettere a Lucilio, libro VI: Le Lettere 53–57. (Testi e Manuali per L'Insegnamento Universitario del Latino 91.) Pp. 419, ills. Bologna: Pàtron Editore, 2006. Paper, €32. ISBN: 978-88-555-2864-. [REVIEW]Margaret Graver - 2008 - The Classical Review 58 (2):478-.
  23.  48
    Morals and Villas in Seneca’s Letters. [REVIEW]Margaret Graver - 2008 - Ancient Philosophy 28 (2):457-460.