Results for 'Margriet Moret-Hartman'

596 found
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  1.  18
    Participatory Workshops Are Not Enough to Prevent Policy Implementation Failures: An Example of a Policy Development Process Concerning the Drug Interferon-Beta for Multiple Sclerosis. [REVIEW]Margriet Moret-Hartman, Rob Reuzel, John Grin & Gert Jan van der Wilt - 2008 - Health Care Analysis 16 (2):161-175.
    A possible explanation for policy implementation failure is that the views of the policy’s target groups are insufficiently taken into account during policy development. It has been argued that involving these groups in an interactive process of policy development could improve this. We analysed a project in which several target populations participated in workshops aimed to optimise the utilisation of an expensive novel drug (interferon beta) for patients with Multiple Sclerosis. All participants seemed to agree on the appropriateness of establishing (...)
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  2.  17
    Hartman's Contagious Orbit: Reassessing Aesthetic CriticismCriticism in the Wilderness: The Study of Literature TodayDeconstruction and the Question of the TextPsychoanalysis and the Question of the TextSaving the Text: Literature/Derrida/Philosophy. [REVIEW]Alexander Argyros, Jerry Aline Flieger & Geoffrey Hartman - 1987 - Diacritics 17 (1):52.
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  3. Kant Does Not Deny Resultant Moral Luck.Robert J. Hartman - 2019 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 43 (1):136-150.
    It is almost unanimously accepted that Kant denies resultant moral luck—that is, he denies that the lucky consequence of a person’s action can affect how much praise or blame she deserves. Philosophers often point to the famous good will passage at the beginning of the Groundwork to justify this claim. I argue, however, that this passage does not support Kant’s denial of resultant moral luck. Subsequently, I argue that Kant allows agents to be morally responsible for certain kinds of lucky (...)
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  4. Accepting Moral Luck.Robert J. Hartman - 2019 - In Ian M. Church & Robert J. Hartman (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy and Psychology of Luck. New York: Routledge.
    I argue that certain kinds of luck can partially determine an agent’s praiseworthiness and blameworthiness. To make this view clearer, consider some examples. Two identical agents drive recklessly around a curb, and one but not the other kills a pedestrian. Two identical corrupt judges would freely take a bribe if one were offered. Only one judge is offered a bribe, and so only one judge takes a bribe. Put in terms of these examples, I argue that the killer driver and (...)
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  5. How to Apply Molinism to the Theological Problem of Moral Luck.Robert J. Hartman - 2014 - Faith and Philosophy 31 (1):68-90.
    The problem of moral luck is that a general fact about luck and an intuitive moral principle jointly imply the following skeptical conclusion: human beings are morally responsible for at most a tiny fraction of each action. This skeptical conclusion threatens to undermine the claim that human beings deserve their respective eternal reward and punishment. But even if this restriction on moral responsibility is compatible with the doctrine of the final judgment, the quality of one’s afterlife within heaven or hell (...)
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  6. The Role of Character in Business Ethics.Edwin M. Hartman - 1998 - Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (3):547-559.
    There is good reason to take a virtue-based approach to business ethics. Moral principles are fairly useful in assessing actions, but understanding how moral people behave and how they become moral requires reference to virtues, some of which are important inbusiness. We must go beyond virtues and refer to character, of which virtues are components, to grasp the relationship between moralassessment and psychological explanation. Virtues and other character traits are closely related to (in technical terms, they superveneon) personality traits postulated (...)
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  7.  14
    Margriet Hoogvliet, Pictura Et Scriptura: Textes, Images Et Herméneutique des “Mappae Mundi” . Turnhout: Brepols, 2007. Pp. 391; 32 Black-and-White and Color Plates. €80. [REVIEW]David Buisseret - 2010 - Speculum 85 (2):401-402.
  8. Involuntary Belief and the Command to Have Faith.Robert J. Hartman - 2011 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 69 (3):181-192.
    Richard Swinburne argues that belief is a necessary but not sufficient condition for faith, and he also argues that, while faith is voluntary, belief is involuntary. This essay is concerned with the tension arising from the involuntary aspect of faith, the Christian doctrine that human beings have an obligation to exercise faith, and the moral claim that people are only responsible for actions where they have the ability to do otherwise. Put more concisely, the problem concerns the coherence of the (...)
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  9.  12
    Left is for Language? Evidence for Reduced Cerebral Lateralization in Adolescents with Down Syndrome.Groen Margriet, Badcock Nicholas & Bishop Dorothy - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  10.  12
    Characteristics of Effective In‐Service Programmes and Activities: Results of a Dutch Survey.Margriet Van Tulder & Simon Veenman - 1991 - Educational Studies 17 (1):25-48.
    The goal of this study is to determine which features effective in‐service activities must have, and to what extent designers of in‐service activities take these features into account. The study is also directed at the relationship between these features of in‐service activities and their implementation and impact characteristics. On the basis of a Delphi‐study, a survey was carried out among teachers, principals, in‐service education and training trainers and school counsellors. This article presents the data gathered on programme participants’ and trainers’ (...)
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  11.  10
    The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy and Psychology of Luck.Ian M. Church & Robert J. Hartman (eds.) - 2019 - Routledge.
    Luck permeates our lives, and this raises a number of pressing questions: What is luck? When we attribute luck to people, circumstances, or events, what are we attributing? Do we have any obligations to mitigate the harms done to people who are less fortunate? And to what extent is deserving praise or blame a ected by good or bad luck? Although acquiring a true belief by an uneducated guess involves a kind of luck that precludes knowledge, does all luck undermine (...)
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  12.  58
    Authority and Democracy: A General Theory of Government and Management.Edwin M. Hartman - 1996 - Philosophical Review 105 (2):272.
    Christopher McMahon links political theory and business ethics and thereby takes the latter to a new level of philosophical sophistication. McMahon argues that legitimate authority, political or managerial, characteristically preempts certain of one’s judgments, so that one may reasonably submit to a directive to do something that contravenes one’s principles. Authoritative preemption does not involve weighing reasons pro and con, as one who is considering breaking a promise must do: it disqualifies competing considerations.
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  13.  13
    Margriet Hoogvliet. Pictura et scriptura: Textes, images, et herméneutique des Mappae mundi . 391 pp., plates, bibl., index. Turnhout: Brepols Publishers, 2007. €65. [REVIEW]P. D. A. Harvey - 2009 - Isis 100 (2):393-394.
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  14. Counterfactuals of Freedom and the Luck Objection to Libertarianism.Robert J. Hartman - 2017 - Journal of Philosophical Research 42 (1):301-312.
    Peter van Inwagen famously offers a version of the luck objection to libertarianism called the ‘Rollback Argument.’ It involves a thought experiment in which God repeatedly rolls time backward to provide an agent with many opportunities to act in the same circumstance. Because the agent has the kind of freedom that affords her alternative possibilities at the moment of choice, she performs different actions in some of these opportunities. The upshot is that whichever action she performs in the actual-sequence is (...)
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  15.  10
    Defining Categories of Actionability for Secondary Findings in Next-Generation Sequencing.Celine Moret, Alex Mauron, Siv Fokstuen, Periklis Makrythanasis & Samia A. Hurst - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (5):346-349.
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  16. Concomitant Ignorance Excuses From Moral Responsibility.Robert J. Hartman - 2021 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 10 (1):58-65.
    Some philosophers contend that concomitant ignorance preserves moral responsibility for wrongdoing. An agent is concomitantly ignorant with respect to wrongdoing if and only if her ignorance is non-culpable, but she would freely have performed the same action if she were not ignorant. I, however, argue that concomitant ignorance excuses. I show that leading accounts of moral responsibility imply that concomitant ignorance excuses, and I debunk the view that concomitant ignorance preserves moral responsibility.
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  17.  7
    Robert Schuman’s Commitment to European Unification.Margriet Krijtenburg - 2015 - Philosophia Reformata 80 (1):140-157.
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  18.  5
    Organizing in the Shadows: Domestic Workers in the Netherlands.Margriet Kraamwinkel - 2016 - Theoretical Inquiries in Law 17 (1):351-367.
    In 2009, a small group of domestic workers joined FNV Bondgenoten, the largest Dutch trade union in the private sector and affiliated with the Dutch trade union confederation FNV. The group that joined consisted mainly of women immigrant workers, many of whom did not have a residence permit. FNV’s policy is that we organize workers and do not ask for passports. Still, a group like this brought to light several problems for FNV, both practical and fundamental. The Article identifies three (...)
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  19. Boekbesprekingen/Comptes Rendus.Margriet Hoogvliet - 2010 - Studium : Revue D’Histoire des Sciences Et des Universités 3:130-138.
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  20. A la Recherche de Normes Pour les Textes Liturgiques de la Messe (Ve-VIIe Siècle).Margriet Vos - 1974 - Revue d'Histoire Ecclésiastique 69:5-37.
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  21.  23
    Nikolaus Andreas Egel, Die Welt im Übergang: Der diskursive, subjektive und skeptische Charakter der “Mappamondo” des Fra Mauro. Heidelberg, Germany: Universitätsverlag Winter, 2014. Pp. 498; 13 color figures. €54. ISBN: 978-3-8253-6214-0. [REVIEW]Margriet Hoogvliet - 2016 - Speculum 91 (2):489-490.
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  22.  12
    A Spanish Adaptation of the Computer and Mobile Device Proficiency Questionnaires for Older Adults.Carmen Moret-Tatay, María José Beneyto-Arrojo, Eugenia Gutierrez, Walter R. Boot & Neil Charness - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
  23.  27
    Moral Philosophy, Political Philosophy, and Organizational Ethics: A Response to Phillips and Margolis.Edwin M. Hartman - 2001 - Business Ethics Quarterly 11 (4):673-685.
    Phillips and Margolis argue that moral philosophy is a poor basis for business ethics, but their narrow view of moral philosophywould exclude Aristotle, for one. They criticize me for assimilating states and organizations in using the Rawlsian device, but they puttoo much faith in Rawls's distinction between states and voluntary organizations and pay too little attention to the continuities betweenthem. Their plea for a conceptually autonomous ethics for organizations I interpret as reasonable and largely compatible with my ownstated opinion.
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  24.  57
    The Commons and the Moral Organization.Edwin M. Hartman - 1994 - Business Ethics Quarterly 4 (3):253-269.
    A complex organization is in effect a commons, which supervisory techniques cannot preserve from free riding. A corporate culture strong enough to create the requisite community-minded second-order desires and beliefs may be morally illegitimate. What morality requires is not local enforcement of foundational moral principles-a futile undertaking-but that the organization be a good community in that it permits the disaffected to exit, encourages reflective consideration of morality and the good life, and creates appropriate loyalty.
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  25.  9
    In Defense of Moral Luck: Why Luck Often Affects Praiseworthiness and Blameworthiness.Robert J. Hartman - 2017 - Routledge.
    There is a contradiction in our ideas about moral responsibility. In one strand of our thinking, we believe that a person can become more blameworthy by luck. Consider some examples in order to make that idea concrete. Two reckless drivers manage their vehicles in the same way, and one but not the other kills a pedestrian. Two corrupt judges would each freely take a bribe if one were offered. By luck of the courthouse draw, only one judge is offered a (...)
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  26. Organizational Ethics and the Good Life.Edwin Hartman - 1996 - Oxford University Press.
    Edwin Hartman argues that ethical principles should not derive from abstract theory, but from the real world of experience in organizations. He explains how ethical principles derive from what workers learn in their communities (firms), and that an ethical firm is one that creates the good life for the workers who contribute to its mission. His approach is based on the Aristotelian tradition of refined common sense, from recent work on collective action problems in organizations, and from social contract (...)
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  27.  8
    Steven A. Epstein, The Medieval Discovery of Nature. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012. Pp. Xiii, 208; 1 Black-and-White Figure. $95. ISBN: 9781107026452. [REVIEW]Margriet Hoogvliet - 2014 - Speculum 89 (1):192-194.
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  28.  9
    Cross‐Sector Partnerships: An Examination of Success Factors.Laura Pincus Hartman & Kanwalroop Kathy Dhanda - 2018 - Business and Society Review 123 (1):181-214.
    In this paper, we examine the drivers involved in an alternative business model: cross-sector social partnerships between for-profit, predominantly multinational corporations and nonprofit organizations. We explore these cross-sector social partnerships from the perspective of these primary stakeholders, examining the questions of power differentials and the definitions and determinants of success. In order more deeply to understand these drivers, we review the evolution of the concept of “value” and the perception of the value that each stakeholder brings to the partnership. We (...)
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  29.  47
    Edwin Hartman, "Substance, Body, and Soul: Aristototelian Investigations". [REVIEW]Helen S. Lang - 1981 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 19 (4):500.
  30.  9
    The Cultural Turn: Empirical Studies and Their Implications.Ross Moret - 2019 - Journal of Religious Ethics 47 (1):180-191.
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  31.  9
    How to Teach Ethics: Assumptions and Arguments.Laura P. Hartman & Edwin M. Hartman - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 1 (2):165-212.
    The American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business has called for stronger ethics programs. There are two problems with this battle cry. First, the AACSB rejects, with weak arguments, the single best way to get ethics into the curriculum. Second, the AACSB can only vaguely describe some unpromising alternatives to that strategy. A number of leading business ethicists have challenged the AACSB to defend and clarify its views, to little avail. The proposed Procedures and Standards cannot by themselves bring about (...)
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  32.  21
    What Sticks? The Evaluation of a Train-the-Trainer Course in Military Ethics and its Perceived Outcomes.Eva van Baarle, Laura Hartman, Desiree Verweij, Bert Molewijk & Guy Widdershoven - 2017 - Journal of Military Ethics 16 (1-2):56-77.
    Ethics training has become a common phenomenon in the training of military professionals at all levels. However, the perceived outcomes of this training remain open. In this article, we analyze the experiences of course participants who were interviewed 6–12 months after they had participated in a train-the-trainer course in military ethics developed by the Faculty of Military Sciences of the Netherlands Defence Academy. Through qualitative inductive analysis, it is shown how participants evaluate the training, how they perceive the development of (...)
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  33.  13
    How to Teach Ethics: Assumptions and Arguments.Laura P. Hartman & Edwin M. Hartman - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 1 (2):165-212.
    The American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business has called for stronger ethics programs. There are two problems with this battle cry. First, the AACSB rejects, with weak arguments, the single best way to get ethics into the curriculum. Second, the AACSB can only vaguely describe some unpromising alternatives to that strategy. A number of leading business ethicists have challenged the AACSB to defend and clarify its views, to little avail. The proposed Procedures and Standards cannot by themselves bring about (...)
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  34.  40
    Character and Leadership.Edwin M. Hartman - 2001 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 20 (2):3-21.
  35.  32
    Socratic Ethics and the Challenge of Globalization.Edwin M. Hartman - 2000 - Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (1):211-220.
    We have reached a rough moral consensus in the field of business ethics. We believe in capitalism with a safety net and enoughregulation to deal with serious market imperfections. We favor autonomy for individuals and democracy for governments, thoughnot necessarily for organizations. We recognize the rights of citizens and the different rights of employees. We respect a variety of possible sets of values, and so countenance a distinction between public and private. In other words, we are capitalists, pluralists, and liberals. (...)
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  36. Moral Luck and The Unfairness of Morality.Robert J. Hartman - 2019 - Philosophical Studies 176 (12):3179-3197.
    Moral luck occurs when factors beyond an agent’s control positively affect how much praise or blame she deserves. Kinds of moral luck are differentiated by the source of lack of control such as the results of her actions, the circumstances in which she finds herself, and the way in which she is constituted. Many philosophers accept the existence of some of these kinds of moral luck but not others, because, in their view, the existence of only some of them would (...)
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  37.  43
    An Aristotelian Approach to Moral Imagination.Edwin M. Hartman - 2000 - Professional Ethics 8 (3/4):57-77.
  38.  31
    Nicolai Hartman's Theory of Virtue.O. C. Jensen - 1941 - Ethics 52 (4):463-479.
  39. Mary Hartman Mary Hartman as American Culture-Some Sociological Observations on Social Construction of Reality.Al Fanta - 1977 - Journal of Thought 12 (3):184-195.
     
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  40.  98
    Beyond Sweatshops: Positive Deviancy and Global Labour Practices.Denis G. Arnold & Laura P. Hartman - 2005 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 14 (3):206–222.
  41.  16
    From Accountability to Action to Amplification: Addressing Our Own Laryngitis.Laura P. Hartman - 2003 - Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (4):563-572.
    The following address considers the relevance of business ethics education to our students. Is our concept of ethics one of practiceand application? And, if so, are we accountable to our students, our institutions and ourselves, for the practical impact that we haveor, conversely, that we do not have? Aren’t we responsible in part if one of our students ventures forth and does not act in an ethicalmanner? Though a positive response to this query may not be popular, what is the (...)
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  42.  10
    La Filosofia Americana: Su Razon y Su Sinrazon de Ser.Robert S. Hartman - 1959 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 19 (3):421-423.
  43.  19
    Guest Editor's Introduction: Reviving Tradition: Virtue and the Common Good in Business and Management.Alejo José G. Sison, Edwin M. Hartman & Joan Fontrodona - 2012 - Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (2):207-210.
    Virtue ethics, the authors believe, is distinct and superior to other options because it considers, in the first place, which preferences are worth pursuing, rather than just blindly maximizing preferences, and it takes into account intuitions, emotions and experience, instead of acting solely on abstract universal principles. Moreover, virtue ethics is seen as firmly rooted in human biology and psychology, particularly in our freedom, rationality, and sociability. Work, business, and management are presented as vital areas for the development of virtues, (...)
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  44.  24
    Environmental Modesty.Laura M. Hartman - 2015 - Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (3):475-492.
    Despite this virtue's history as an instrument of women's oppression, modesty, at its most basic, means voluntary restraint of one's power, undertaken for the sake of others. It is a mechanism that modifies unequal power relationships and encourages greater compassion and fairness. I use a Christian perspective with influences from Jewish and Muslim sources to examine modesty. The modest person, I argue, must be in relationship with others, must be honestly aware of her impacts on others, must be sensitive to (...)
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  45.  72
    Robert Hartman's Formal Axiology: An Extension. [REVIEW]Robert S. Brumbaugh - 1977 - Journal of Value Inquiry 11 (4):259-263.
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  46. Geoffrey Hartman: Criticism as Answerable Style.G. Douglas Atkins - 1990 - Routledge.
    `The critic explicitly acknowledges his dependence on prior words that make his word a kind of answer. He calls to other texts "that they might answer him."' Geoffrey Hartman is the first book devoted to an exploration of the `intellectual poetry' of the critic who, whether or not he `represents the future of the profession', is a unique and major voice in twentieth-century criticism. Professor Atkins explains clearly Hartman's key ideas and places his work in the contexts of (...)
     
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  47. Geoffrey Hartman: Criticism as Answerable Style.G. Douglas Atkins - 1990 - Routledge.
    `The critic explicitly acknowledges his dependence on prior words that make his word a kind of answer. He calls to other texts "that they might answer him."' _Geoffrey Hartman_ is the first book devoted to an exploration of the `intellectual poetry' of the critic who, whether or not he `represents the future of the profession', is a unique and major voice in twentieth-century criticism. Professor Atkins explains clearly Hartman's key ideas and places his work in the contexts of Romanticism (...)
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  48. Geoffrey Hartman: Criticism as Answerable Style.George Douglas Atkins - 1990 - Routledge.
    `The critic explicitly acknowledges his dependence on prior words that make his word a kind of answer. He calls to other texts "that they might answer him."' _Geoffrey Hartman_ is the first book devoted to an exploration of the `intellectual poetry' of the critic who, whether or not he `represents the future of the profession', is a unique and major voice in twentieth-century criticism. Professor Atkins explains clearly Hartman's key ideas and places his work in the contexts of Romanticism (...)
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  49. HARTMAN, EDWIN "Substance, Body and Soul: Aristotelian Investigations". [REVIEW]Malcolm Schofield - 1979 - Philosophy 54:427.
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  50.  17
    Robert Hartman and Wolfgang Schwarz (Eds.), Kant's Logic. [REVIEW]T. E. Wilkerson - 1975 - Philosophical Quarterly 25 (99):164.
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