7 found
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  1.  36
    Language as Context for the Perception of Emotion.Lisa Feldman Barrett, Kristen A. Lindquist & Maria Gendron - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (8):327-332.
  2.  35
    What’s in a Word? Language Constructs Emotion Perception.Kristen A. Lindquist & Maria Gendron - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (1):66-71.
    In this review, we highlight evidence suggesting that concepts represented in language are used to create a perception of emotion from the constant ebb and flow of other people’s facial muscle movements. In this “construction hypothesis,” (cf. Gendron, Lindquist, Barsalou, & Barrett, 2012) (see also Barrett, 2006b; Barrett, Lindquist, & Gendron, 2007; Barrett, Mesquita, & Gendron, 2011), language plays a constitutive role in emotion perception because words ground the otherwise highly variable instances of an emotion category. We demonstrate that language (...)
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  3.  16
    Reconstructing the Past: A Century of Ideas About Emotion in Psychology.Maria Gendron & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2009 - Emotion Review 1 (4):316-339.
    Within the discipline of psychology, the conventional history outlines the development of two fundamental approaches to the scientific study of emotion—“basic emotion” and “appraisal” traditions. In this article, we outline the development of a third approach to emotion that exists in the psychological literature—the “psychological constructionist” tradition. In the process, we discuss a number of works that have virtually disappeared from the citation trail in psychological discussions of emotion. We also correct some misconceptions about early sources, such as work by (...)
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  4.  29
    Reconstructing the Past: A Century of Ideas About Emotion in Psychology.Maria Gendron & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2009 - Emotion Review 1 (4):316.
    Within the discipline of psychology, the conventional history outlines the development of two fundamental approaches to the scientific study of emotion—“basic emotion” and “appraisal” traditions. In this article, we outline the development of a third approach to emotion that exists in the psychological literature—the “psychological constructionist” tradition. In the process, we discuss a number of works that have virtually disappeared from the citation trail in psychological discussions of emotion. We also correct some misconceptions about early sources, such as work by (...)
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  5.  24
    Emotion Perception as Conceptual Synchrony.Maria Gendron & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2018 - Emotion Review 10 (2):101-110.
    Psychological research on emotion perception anchors heavily on an object perception analogy. We present static “cues,” such as facial expressions, as objects for perceivers to categorize. Yet in the real world, emotions play out as dynamic multidimensional events. Current theoretical approaches and research methods are limited in their ability to capture this complexity. We draw on insights from a predictive coding account of neural activity and a grounded cognition account of concept representation to conceive of emotion perception as a stream (...)
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  6.  85
    Do Discrete Emotions Exist?Yang-Ming Huang, Maria Gendron & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2009 - Philosophical Psychology 22 (4):427-437.
    In various guises (usually referred to as the “basic emotion” or “discrete emotion” approach), scientists and philosophers have long argued that certain categories of emotion are natural kinds. In a recent paper, Colombetti (2009) proposed yet another natural kind account, and in so doing, characterized and critiqued psychological constructionist approaches to emotion, including our own Conceptual Act Model. In this commentary, we briefly address three topics raised by Columbetti. First, we correct several common misperceptions about the discrete emotion approach to (...)
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  7. Defining Emotion: A Brief History.Maria Gendron - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (4):371-372.
    The effort to define the term “emotion” has a long history in the discipline of psychology. Izard’s survey (2010) canvassed prominent emotion theorists and researchers on their working definitions of emotion. The particular assumptions about emotion reported, as well as the conclusion that the term “emotion” lacks a consensus definition, both have historical precedent. In this commentary, I place Izard’s findings in this historical context and discuss the implications of his survey for the future of emotion research.
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