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  1. Mechanistic and topological explanations in medicine: the case of medical genetics and network medicine.Marie Darrason - 2018 - Synthese 195 (1):147-173.
    Medical explanations have often been thought on the model of biological ones and are frequently defined as mechanistic explanations of a biological dysfunction. In this paper, I argue that topological explanations, which have been described in ecology or in cognitive sciences, can also be found in medicine and I discuss the relationships between mechanistic and topological explanations in medicine, through the example of network medicine and medical genetics. Network medicine is a recent discipline that relies on the analysis of various (...)
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  2. Unifying diseases from a genetic point of view: the example of the genetic theory of infectious diseases.Marie Darrason - 2013 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (4):327-344.
    In the contemporary biomedical literature, every disease is considered genetic. This extension of the concept of genetic disease is usually interpreted either in a trivial or genocentrist sense, but it is never taken seriously as the expression of a genetic theory of disease. However, a group of French researchers defend the idea of a genetic theory of infectious diseases. By identifying four common genetic mechanisms (Mendelian predisposition to multiple infections, Mendelian predisposition to one infection, and major gene and polygenic predispositions), (...)
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    Reuniting philosophy and science to advance cancer research.Thomas Pradeu, Bertrand Daignan-Fornier, Andrew Ewald, Pierre-Luc Germain, Samir Okasha, Anya Plutynski, Sébastien Benzekry, Marta Bertolaso, Mina Bissell, Joel S. Brown, Benjamin Chin-Yee, Ian Chin-Yee, Hans Clevers, Laurent Cognet, Marie Darrason, Emmanuel Farge, Jean Feunteun, Jérôme Galon, Elodie Giroux, Sara Green, Fridolin Gross, Fanny Jaulin, Rob Knight, Ezio Laconi, Nicolas Larmonier, Carlo Maley, Alberto Mantovani, Violaine Moreau, Pierre Nassoy, Elena Rondeau, David Santamaria, Catherine M. Sawai, Andrei Seluanov, Gregory D. Sepich-Poore, Vanja Sisirak, Eric Solary, Sarah Yvonnet & Lucie Laplane - 2023 - Biological Reviews 98 (5):1668-1686.
    Cancers rely on multiple, heterogeneous processes at different scales, pertaining to many biomedical fields. Therefore, understanding cancer is necessarily an interdisciplinary task that requires placing specialised experimental and clinical research into a broader conceptual, theoretical, and methodological framework. Without such a framework, oncology will collect piecemeal results, with scant dialogue between the different scientific communities studying cancer. We argue that one important way forward in service of a more successful dialogue is through greater integration of applied sciences (experimental and clinical) (...)
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    Médecine de précision et médecine des systèmes: La médecine personnalisée se trompet-elle de cible?Marie Darrason - 2017 - Lato Sensu: Revue de la Société de Philosophie des Sciences 4 (2):66-82.
    Le terme de médecine personnalisée peut désigner indifféremment la médecine de précision et la médecine des systèmes. L’objectif de cet article est d’analyser les rapports entre ces deux faces de la médecine personnalisée, au prisme de l’histoire du développement des thérapies ciblées. Les thérapies ciblées ont été développées dans le cadre de la médecine de précision, en s’appuyant sur le concept d’addiction oncogénique et sur l’idée qu’à chaque biomarqueur permettant d’identifier un sous-type de cancer correspondrait un médicament précis. Ce modèle (...)
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