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Marie-Christine Nizzi
Harvard University
  1.  18
    From Armchair to Wheelchair: How Patients with a Locked-in Syndrome Integrate Bodily Changes in Experienced Identity.Marie-Christine Nizzi, Athena Demertzi, Olivia Gosseries, Marie-Aurélie Bruno, François Jouen & Steven Laureys - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):431-437.
    Different sort of people are interested in personal identity. Philosophers frequently ask what it takes to remain oneself. Caregivers imagine their patients’ experience. But both philosophers and caregivers think from the armchair: they can only make assumptions about what it would be like to wake up with massive bodily changes. Patients with a locked-in syndrome suffer a full body paralysis without cognitive impairment. They can tell us what it is like. Forty-four chronic LIS patients and 20 age-matched healthy medical professionals (...)
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  2.  36
    Attitudes Towards Personhood in the Locked-in Syndrome: From Third- to First- Person Perspective and to Interpersonal Significance.Marie-Christine Nizzi, Veronique Blandin & Athina Demertzi - 2018 - Neuroethics:1-9.
    Personhood is ascribed on others, such that someone who is recognized to be a person is bestowed with certain civil rights and the right to decision making. A rising question is how severely brain-injured patients who regain consciousness can also regain their personhood. The case of patients with locked-in syndrome is illustrative in this matter. Upon restoration of consciousness, patients with LIS find themselves in a state of profound demolition of their bodily functions. From the third-person perspective, it can be (...)
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    Attitudes Towards Personhood in the Locked-in Syndrome: From Third- to First- Person Perspective and to Interpersonal Significance.Marie-Christine Nizzi, Veronique Blandin & Athena Demertzi - 2020 - Neuroethics 13 (2):193-201.
    Personhood is ascribed on others, such that someone who is recognized to be a person is bestowed with certain civil rights and the right to decision making. A rising question is how severely brain-injured patients who regain consciousness can also regain their personhood. The case of patients with locked-in syndrome is illustrative in this matter. Upon restoration of consciousness, patients with LIS find themselves in a state of profound demolition of their bodily functions. From the third-person perspective, it can be (...)
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  4.  34
    Postphenomenological Investigations: Essays on Human–Technology Relations.Don Ihde, Lenore Langsdorf, Kirk M. Besmer, Aud Sissel Hoel, Annamaria Carusi, Marie-Christine Nizzi, Fernando Secomandi, Asle Kiran, Yoni Van Den Eede, Frances Bottenberg, Chris Kaposy, Adam Rosenfeld, Jan Kyrre Berg O. Friis, Andrew Feenberg, Diane Michelfelder & Albert Borgmann - 2015 - Lexington Books.
    This book provides an introduction to postphenomenology, an emerging school of thought in the philosophy of technology and science and technology studies, which addresses the relationships users develop with the devices they use.
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  5. Should We Trust Patient-Reported Outcomes?Marie-Christine Nizzi - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 12 (2-3):156-159.
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