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  1.  6
    Redrawing the Boundaries of Feminist Disability StudiesInvalid Women: Figuring Feminine Illness in American Fiction and Culture, 1840-1940Monstrous ImaginationTattoo, Torture, Mutilation, and Adornment: The Denaturalization of the Body in Culture and TextFeminism and Disability. [REVIEW]Rosemarie Garland Thomson, Diane Price Herndl, Marie-Hélène Huet, Frances E. Mascia-Lees, Patricia Sharpe, Barbara Hillyer & Marie-Helene Huet - 1994 - Feminist Studies 20 (3):582.
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  2.  14
    Monstrous Imagination: Progeny as Art in French Classicism.Marie-Hélène Huet - 1991 - Critical Inquiry 17 (4):718-737.
    The monster and the woman thus find themselves on the same side, the side of dissimilarity. “The female is as it were a deformed male,” added Aristotle . As she belongs to the category of the different, the female can only contribute more figures of dissimilarities, if not creatures even more monstrous. But the female is a necessary departure from the norm, a useful monstrosity. The monster is gratuitous and useless for future generations. Aristotle’s seminal work on the generation of (...)
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    Science Fiction Before 1900, Imagination Discovers Technology.Marie-Helene Huet & Paul K. Alkon - 1996 - Substance 25 (1):116.
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    Chateaubriand and the Politics of (Im)Mortality.Marie-Hélène Huet - 2000 - Diacritics 30 (3):28-39.
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