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  1.  28
    Show and Tell: The Role of Language in Categorizing Facial Expression of Emotion.Debi Roberson, Ljubica Damjanovic & Mariko Kikutani - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (3):255-260.
    We review evidence that language is involved in the establishment and maintenance of adult categories of facial expressions of emotion. We argue that individual and group differences in facial expression interpretation are too great for a fully specified system of categories to be universal and hardwired. Variations in expression categorization, across individuals and groups, favor a model in which an initial “core” system recognizes only the grouping of positive versus negative emotional expressions. The subsequent development of a rich representational structure (...)
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  2.  20
    Shades of Emotion: What the Addition of Sunglasses or Masks to Faces Reveals About the Development of Facial Expression Processing.Debi Roberson, Mariko Kikutani, Paula Döge, Lydia Whitaker & Asifa Majid - 2012 - Cognition 125 (2):195-206.
  3. Detecting Emotion in Speech Expressing Incongruent Emotional Cues Through Voice and Content: Investigation on Dominant Modality and Language.Mariko Kikutani & Machiko Ikemoto - 2022 - Cognition and Emotion 36 (3):492-511.
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  4. Properties of Central and Peripheral Concepts of Emotion in Japanese and Korean: An Examination Using a Multi-Dimensional Model.Eun-Joo Park, Mariko Kikutani, Naoto Suzuki, Machiko Ikemoto & Jang-Han Lee - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    The concept of emotion can be organized within a hypothetical space comprising a limited number of dimensions representing essential properties of emotion. The present study examined cultural influences on such conceptual structure by comparing the performance of emotion word classification between Japanese and Korean individuals. Two types of emotional words were used; central concepts, highly typical examples of emotion, and less typical peripheral concepts. Participants classified 30 words into groups based on conceptual similarity. MDS analyses revealed a three-dimensional structure with (...)
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