Results for 'Mark A. Matienzo'

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Mark A. Matienzo
Stanford University
  1.  52
    Issue-Contingent Effects on Ethical Decision Making: A Cross-Cultural Comparison. [REVIEW]Mark A. Davis, Nancy Brown Johnson & Douglas G. Ohmer - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (4):373-389.
    This experiment examined the effects of three elements comprising Jones' (1991) moral intensity construct, (social consensus, personal proximity, and magnitude of consequences) in a cross-cultural comparison of ethical decision making within a human resource management (HRM) context. Results indicated social consensus had the most potent effect on judgments of moral concern and judgments of immorality. An analysis of American, Eastern European, and Indonesian responses also indicted socio-cultural differences were moderated by the type of HRM ethical issue. In addition, individual differences (...)
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  2.  95
    Toward a Theory of Episodic Memory: The Frontal Lobes and Autonoetic Consciousness.Mark A. Wheeler, Stuss, T. Donald & Endel Tulving - 1997 - Psychological Bulletin 121:331-54.
  3.  20
    Toward a Method of Selecting Among Computational Models of Cognition.Mark A. Pitt, In Jae Myung & Shaobo Zhang - 2002 - Psychological Review 109 (3):472-491.
  4.  88
    Measuring Ethical Ideology in Business Ethics: A Critical Analysis of the Ethics Position Questionnaire. [REVIEW]Mark A. Davis, Mark G. Andersen & Mary B. Curtis - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 32 (1):35 - 53.
    Individual differences in ethical ideology are believed to play a key role in ethical decision making. Forsyths (1980) Ethics Position Questionnaire (EPQ) is designed to measure ethical ideology along two dimensions, relativism and idealism. This study extends the work of Forsyth by examining the construct validity of the EPQ. Confirmatory factor analyses conducted with independent samples indicated three factors – idealism, relativism, and veracity – account for the relationships among EPQ items. In order to provide further evidence of the instruments (...)
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  5.  13
    Modeling the Neural Substrates of Associative Learning and Memory: A Computational Approach.Mark A. Gluck & Richard F. Thompson - 1987 - Psychological Review 94 (2):176-191.
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  6.  33
    Currents in Contemporary Ethics: Improve Privacy in Research by Eliminating Informed Consent? IOM Report Misses the Mark.Mark A. Rothstein - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (3):507-512.
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  7.  68
    A Functional Account of Degrees of Minimal Chemical Life.Mark A. Bedau - 2012 - Synthese 185 (1):73-88.
    This paper describes and defends the view that minimal chemical life essentially involves the chemical integration of three chemical functionalities: containment, metabolism, and program (Rasmussen et al. in Protocells: bridging nonliving and living matter, 2009a ). This view is illustrated and explained with the help of CMP and Rasmussen diagrams (Rasmussen et al. In: Rasmussen et al. (eds.) in Protocells: bridging nonliving and living matter, 71–100, 2009b ), both of which represent the key chemical functional dependencies among containment, metabolism, and (...)
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  8. Weak Emergence.Mark A. Bedau - 1997 - Philosophical Perspectives 11:375-399.
    An innocent form of emergence—what I call "weak emergence"—is now a commonplace in a thriving interdisciplinary nexus of scientific activity—sometimes called the "sciences of complexity"—that include connectionist modelling, non-linear dynamics (popularly known as "chaos" theory), and artificial life.1 After defining it, illustrating it in two contexts, and reviewing the available evidence, I conclude that the scientific and philosophical prospects for weak emergence are bright.
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  9.  26
    Creationism in Twentieth-Century America: A Ten-Volume Anthology of Documents, 1903-1961. Ronald L. Numbers, William Vance Trollinger, Jr., Paul Nelson, Edward B. Davis, Mark A. Kalthoff. [REVIEW]Mark A. Noll - 1997 - Isis 88 (1):160-162.
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  10.  16
    From Conditioning to Category Learning: An Adaptive Network Model.Mark A. Gluck & Gordon H. Bower - 1988 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 117 (3):227-247.
  11.  14
    What Happens in a Moment.Mark A. Elliott & Anne Giersch - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Therehasbeenevidencefortheverybrief,temporalquantizationofperceptualexperienceatregularintervalsbelo w100msforseveraldecades.Webrieflydescribehowearlierstudiesledtotheconceptof“psychologicalmoment”ofbe tween50and60msduration.Accordingtohistoricaltheories,withinthepsychologicalmomentalleventswouldbepro cessedasco-temporal.Morerecently,alinkwithphysiologicalmechanismshasbeenproposed,accordingtowhichthe 50–60mspsychologicalmomentwouldbedefinedbytheupperlimitrequiredbyneuralmechanismstosynchronizeandthe rebyrepresentasnapshotofcurrentperceptualeventstructure.However,ourownexperimentaldevelopmentsalsoid entifyamorefine-scaled,serializedprocessstructurewithinthepsychologicalmoment.Ourdatasuggeststhatnot alleventsareprocessedasco-temporalwithinthepsychologicalmomentandinstead,someareprocessedsuccessivel y.Thisevidencequestionstheanalogrelationshipbetweensynchronizedprocessandsimultaneousexperienceandop ensdebateontheontologyandfunctionof“moments”inpsychologicalexperience.
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  12.  98
    The Future of a Discipline: Considering the Ontological/Methodological Future of the Anthropology of Consciousness, Part I.Mark A. Schroll - 2010 - Anthropology of Consciousness 21 (1):1-29.
    Calling for an expanded framework of EuroAmerican science's methodology whose perspective acknowledges both quantitative/etic and qualitative/emic orientations is the broad focus of this article. More specifically this article argues that our understanding of shamanic and/or other related states of consciousness has been greatly enhanced through ethnographic methods, yet in their present form these methods fail to provide the means to fully comprehend these states. They fail, or are limited, because this approach is only a “cognitive interpretation” or “metanarrative” of the (...)
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  13. Is Weak Emergence Just in the Mind?Mark A. Bedau - 2008 - Minds and Machines 18 (4):443-459.
    Weak emergence is the view that a system’s macro properties can be explained by its micro properties but only in an especially complicated way. This paper explains a version of weak emergence based on the notion of explanatory incompressibility and “crawling the causal web.” Then it examines three reasons why weak emergence might be thought to be just in the mind. The first reason is based on contrasting mere epistemological emergence with a form of ontological emergence that involves irreducible downward (...)
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  14.  80
    Trivial Tasks That Consume a Lifetime: Kierkegaard on Immortality and Becoming Subjective.Mark A. Wrathall - 2015 - The Journal of Ethics 19 (3-4):419-441.
    S. Kierkegaard argued that our highest task as humans is to realize an “intensified” or “developed” form of subjectivity—his name for self-responsible agency. A self-responsible agent is not only responsible for her actions. She also bears responsibility for the individual that she is. In this paper, I review Kierkegaard’s account of the role that our capacity for reflective self-evaluation plays in making us responsible for ourselves. It is in the exercise of this capacity that we can go from being subjective (...)
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  15. Can Biological Teleology Be Naturalized?Mark A. Bedau - 1991 - Journal of Philosophy 88 (11):647-655.
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  16.  10
    Toward a Physical Theory of the Source of Religion.Mark A. Schroll - 2005 - Anthropology of Consciousness 16 (1):56-69.
  17.  69
    Weak Emergence.Mark A. Bedau - 1997 - Noûs 31 (S11):375-399.
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  18.  7
    Challenge and Threat: A Critical Review of the Literature and an Alternative Conceptualization.Mark A. Uphill, Claire J. L. Rossato, Jon Swain & Jamie O’Driscoll - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  19.  37
    A Companion to Heidegger.Hubert L. Dreyfus & Mark A. Wrathall (eds.) - 2005 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    The Blackwell Companion to Heidegger is a complete guide to the work and thought of Martin Heidegger, one of the most influential philosophers of the twentieth century. Considers the most important elements of Heidegger’s intellectual biography, including his notorious involvement with National Socialism Provides a systematic and comprehensive exploration of Heidegger’s work One of the few books on Heidegger to cover his later work as well as Being and Time Includes key critical responses to Heidegger’s philosophy Contributors include many of (...)
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  20.  4
    Perceiving the Present and a Systematization of Illusions.Mark A. Changizi, Andrew Hsieh, Romi Nijhawan, Ryota Kanai & Shinsuke Shimojo - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (3):459-503.
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  21. Downward Causation and the Autonomy of Weak Emergence.Mark A. Bedau - 2002 - Principia 6 (1):5-50.
    Weak emergence has been offered as an explication of the ubiquitous notion of emergence used in complexity science (Bedau 1997). After outlining the problem of emergence and comparing weak emergence with the two other main objectivist approaches to emergence, this paper explains a version of weak emergence and illustrates it with cellular automata. Then it explains the sort of downward causation and explanatory autonomy involved in weak emergence.
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  22.  11
    Unregulated Health Research Using Mobile Devices: Ethical Considerations and Policy Recommendations.Mark A. Rothstein, John T. Wilbanks, Laura M. Beskow, Kathleen M. Brelsford, Kyle B. Brothers, Megan Doerr, Barbara J. Evans, Catherine M. Hammack-Aviran, Michelle L. McGowan & Stacey A. Tovino - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (S1):196-226.
    Mobile devices with health apps, direct-to-consumer genetic testing, crowd-sourced information, and other data sources have enabled research by new classes of researchers. Independent researchers, citizen scientists, patient-directed researchers, self-experimenters, and others are not covered by federal research regulations because they are not recipients of federal financial assistance or conducting research in anticipation of a submission to the FDA for approval of a new drug or medical device. This article addresses the difficult policy challenge of promoting the welfare and interests of (...)
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  23. On 'Logos' in Heraclitus.Mark A. Johnstone - 2014 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 47:1-29.
    In this paper, I offer a new solution to the old problem of how best to understand the meaning of the word ‘logos’ in the extant writings of Heraclitus, especially in fragments DK B1, B2 and B50. On the view I defend, Heraclitus was neither using the word in a perfectly ordinary way in these fragments, as some have maintained, nor denoting by it some kind of general principle or law governing change in the cosmos, as many have claimed. Rather, (...)
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  24.  94
    Improving Access to Health Care: A Consensus Ethical Framework to Guide Proposals for Reform.Mark A. Levine, Matthew K. Wynia, Paul M. Schyve, J. Russell Teagarden, David A. Fleming, Sharon King Donohue, Ron J. Anderson, James Sabin & Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 2007 - Hastings Center Report 37 (5):14-19.
  25.  46
    The Development of Moral Imagination.Mark A. Seabright - 2000 - Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (4):845-884.
    Moral imagination is a reasoning process thought to counter the organizational factors that corrupt ethical judgment. We describethe psychology of moral imagination as composed of the four decision processes identified by Rest (1986), i.e., moral sensitivity, moraljudgment, moral intention, and moral behavior. We examine each process in depth, distilling extant psychological research andindicating organizational implications. The conclusion offers suggestions for future research.
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  26.  32
    Worldviews in Collision/Worldviews in Metamorphosis: Toward a Multistate Paradigm.Mark A. Schroll & Susan Greenwood - 2011 - Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (1):49-60.
    This article is an extended commentary inspired by Alan Drengson's paper “Shifting Paradigms: From Technocrat to Planetary Person” (Drengson 2011). In this article Susan Greenwood and I echo Drengson's criticism that Euro-American science is incomplete, having committed what Thomas Roberts calls “The Singlestate Fallacy: the erroneous assumption that all worthwhile abilities reside in our normal, awake mindbody state” (Roberts 2006:105). This singlestate fallacy is vividly portrayed in Mary Shelley's novel Frankenstein, whose critique of Euro-American science is revisited in this article. (...)
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  27.  50
    A Closer Look At Leibniz’s Alleged Reduction of Relations.Mark A. Kulstad - 1980 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 18 (4):417-432.
  28.  23
    Is Deidentification Sufficient to Protect Health Privacy in Research?Mark A. Rothstein - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (9):3-11.
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  29.  91
    On the Logic of Ability.Mark A. Brown - 1988 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 17 (1):1 - 26.
  30.  14
    Empathy is a Poor Foundation on Which to Base Legislative Medical Policy.Mark A. Graber & John W. Ely - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (7):402-404.
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  31. The Limits of Public Health: A Response.Mark A. Rothstein - 2009 - Public Health Ethics 2 (1):84-88.
    Boehl Chair of Law and Medicine and Director of the Institute for Bioethics, Health Policy and Law, University of Louisville School of Medicine, 501 East Broadway # 310, Louisville, Kentucky 40202, USA. Tel.: 502 852 4980; Fax: 502 852 4963; Email: mark.rothstein{at}louisville.edu ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> Abstract In his article in this issue, Daniel Goldberg advocates a broad definition of public health and expressly rejects the narrow definition of public health I proposed in (...)
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  32.  44
    Does Consent Bias Research?Mark A. Rothstein & Abigail B. Shoben - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (4):27 - 37.
    Researchers increasingly rely on large data sets of health information, often linked with biological specimens. In recent years, the argument has been made that obtaining informed consent for conducting records-based research is unduly burdensome and results in ?consent bias.? As a type of selection bias, consent bias is said to exist when the group giving researchers access to their data differs from the group denying access. Therefore, to promote socially beneficial research, it is argued that consent should be unnecessary. After (...)
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  33.  14
    Citizen Science on Your Smartphone: An ELSI Research Agenda: Currents in Contemporary Bioethics.Mark A. Rothstein, John T. Wilbanks & Kyle B. Brothers - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (4):897-903.
    Beginning in the 20th century, scientific research came to be dominated by a growing class of credentialed, professional scientists who overwhelmingly displaced the learned amateurs of an earlier time. By the end of the century, however, the exclusive realm of professional scientists conducting research was joined, to a degree, by “citizen scientists.” The term originally encompassed non-professionals assisting professional scientists by contributing observations and measurements to ongoing research enterprises. These collaborations were especially common in the environmental sciences, where citizen scientists (...)
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  34.  39
    A Logic of Comparative Obligation.Mark A. Brown - 1996 - Studia Logica 57 (1):117 - 137.
    Normal systems of modal logic, interpreted as deontic logics, are unsuitable for a logic of conflicting obligations. By using modal operators based on a more complex semantics, however, we can provide for conflicting obligations, as in [9], which is formally similar to a fragment of the logic of ability later given in [2], Having gone that far, we may find it desirable to be able to express and consider claims about the comparative strengths, or degrees of urgency, of the conflicting (...)
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  35.  7
    Rich Deontic Logic: A Preliminary Study.Mark A. Brown - 2004 - Journal of Applied Logic 2 (1):19-37.
  36.  40
    Rethinking the Meaning of Public Health.Mark A. Rothstein - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (2):144-149.
    Public health is a dynamic field. Outbreaks of new diseases, as well as changing patterns of population growth, economic development, and lifestyle trends all may threaten public health and thus demand a public health response. As the practice of public health evolves, there is an ongoing need to reassess its scientific, ethical, legal, and social underpinnings. Such a reappraisal must consider the disagreement among public health officials, public health scholars, elected officials, and the public about the proper role of public (...)
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  37.  61
    Evolutionary Design of a DDPD Model of Ligation.Mark A. Bedau & Andrew Buchanan - unknown
    Ligation is a form of chemical self-assembly that involves dynamic formation of strong covalent bonds in the presence of weak associative forces. We study an extremely simple form of ligation by means of a dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) model extended to include the dynamic making and breaking of strong bonds, which we term dynamically bonding dissipative particle dynamics (DDPD). Then we use a chemical genetic algorithm (CGA) to optimize the model’s parameters to achieve a limited form of ligation of trimers—a (...)
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  38.  9
    Comparative Approaches to Biobanks and Privacy.Mark A. Rothstein, Bartha Maria Knoppers & Heather L. Harrell - 2016 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 44 (1):161-172.
    Laws in the 20 jurisdictions studied for this project display many similar approaches to protecting privacy in biobank research. Although few have enacted biobank-specific legislation, many countries address biobanking within other laws. All provide for some oversight mechanisms for biobank research, even though the nature of that oversight varies between jurisdictions. Most have some sort of controlled access system in place for research with biobank specimens. While broad consent models facilitate biobanking, countries without national or federated biobanks have been slow (...)
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  39. The Nature of Life.Mark A. Bedau - 1996 - In Margaret A. Boden (ed.), The Philosophy of Artificial Life. Oxford University Press. pp. 332--357.
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  40.  98
    Heidegger and Unconcealment: Truth, Language, and History.Mark A. Wrathall - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book includes ten essays that trace the notion of unconcealment as it develops from Heidegger's early writings to his later work, shaping his philosophy of truth, language and history. 'Unconcealment' is the idea that what entities are depends on the conditions that allow them to manifest themselves. This concept, central to Heidegger's work, also applies to worlds in a dual sense: first, a condition of entities manifesting themselves is the existence of a world; and second, worlds themselves are disclosed. (...)
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  41.  74
    Goal-Directed Systems and the Good.Mark A. Bedau - 1992 - The Monist 75 (1):34-51.
    We can readily identify goal-directed systems and distinguish them from non-goal-directed systems. A woodpecker hunting for grubs is the first, a pendulum returning to rest is the second. But what is it to be a goal-directed system? Perhaps the dominant answer to this question, inspired by systems theories such as cybernetics, is that goal-directed systems are distinguished by their tendency to seek, aim at, or maintain some more-or-less easily identifiable goal. Cybernetics and the like would hold that physical systems subject (...)
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  42. Aristotle on Odour and Smell.Mark A. Johnstone - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 43:143-83.
    The sense of smell occupies a peculiar intermediate position within Aristotle's theory of sense perception: odours, like colours and sounds, are perceived at a distance through an external medium of air or water; yet in their nature they are intimately related to flavours, the proper objects of taste, which for Aristotle is a form of touch. In this paper, I examine Aristotle's claims about odour and smell, especially in De Anima II.9 and De Sensu 5, to see what light they (...)
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  43.  32
    Ethical Issues in Big Data Health Research: Currents in Contemporary Bioethics.Mark A. Rothstein - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (2):425-429.
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  44.  13
    A Moral Case for the Social Relations of Slavery.Mark A. Noll - 2007 - Modern Intellectual History 4 (1):191-204.
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  45. Changing Rulers in the Soul: Psychological Transitions in Republic 8-9.Mark A. Johnstone - 2011 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 41:139-67.
    In this paper, I consider how each of the four main kinds of corrupt person described in Plato's Republic, Books 8-9, first comes to be. Certain passages in these books can give the impression that each person is able to determine, by a kind of rational choice, the overall government of his/her soul. However, I argue, this impression is mistaken. Upon careful examination, the text of books 8 and 9 overwhelmingly supports an alternative interpretation. According to this view, the eventual (...)
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  46.  8
    Rethinking the Meaning of Public Health.Mark A. Rothstein - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (2):144-149.
    Public health is a dynamic field. Outbreaks of new diseases, as well as changing patterns of population growth, economic development, and lifestyle trends all may threaten public health and thus demand a public health response. As the practice of public health evolves, there is an ongoing need to reassess its scientific, ethical, legal, and social underpinnings. Such a reappraisal must consider the disagreement among public health officials, public health scholars, elected officials, and the public about the proper role of public (...)
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  47.  7
    California Takes the Lead on Data Privacy Law.Mark A. Rothstein & Stacey A. Tovino - 2019 - Hastings Center Report 49 (5):4-5.
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  48.  7
    How to Read Heidegger.Mark A. Wrathall - 2005 - W.W. Norton.
    Dasein and being-in-the-world -- The world -- The structure of being-in-the-world, pt. 1: Disposedness and moods -- The structure of being-in-the-world, pt. 2: Understanding and interpretation -- Everydayness and the 'one' -- Death and authenticity -- Truth and art -- Language -- Technology -- Our mortal dwelling with things.
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  49.  32
    The Cambridge Companion to Heidegger's Being and Time.Mark A. Wrathall (ed.) - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Companion begins with a section-by-section overview of Being and Time and a chapter reviewing the genesis of this seminal work. The final chapter situates Being and Time in the context of Heidegger's later work.
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  50.  44
    Immoral Imagination and Revenge in Organizations.Mark A. Seabright & Marshall Schminke - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 38 (1-2):19 - 31.
    Malevolence and cruelty are commonly attributed to a failure of moral reasoning or a lack of moral imagination. We present the contrasting viewpoint – immorality as an active, creative, or resourceful act. More specifically, we develop the concept of "immoral imagination" (Jacobs, 1991) and explore how it can enter into Rest's (1986) four processes of decision making: sensitivity, judgment, intention, and implementation. The literature on revenge and workplace deviance illustrates these processes.
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