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Mark Anderson [19]Mark M. Anderson [3]Mark D. Anderson [1]Mark B. Anderson [1]
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Mark Anderson
Belmont University
  1.  21
    Notes on Plato and Nietzsche.Mark Anderson - forthcoming - In Diamythologômen: A Philosophical Portrait of a Philosopher Philosophizing. Nashville, TN, USA: pp. 131-181.
    "Plato and Nietzsche contra Phaedo-Platonism" would be an appropriate subtitle for this chapter, in which I develop a reading of Plato's Phaedo as a work of philosophical art, and Plato as a philosopher-artist (in a Nietzschean mode). The chapter includes an argument that, contrary to the standard reading, the Phaedo does not teach the doctrine of escape from the cycle of rebirth (pp. 151-160). As significant as this conclusion is in and for itself, it implies as well that Nietzsche cannot (...)
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  2.  22
    Melville and Nietzsche: Living the Death of God.Mark Anderson - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40:59-75.
    Herman Melville was so estranged from the religious beliefs of his time and place that his faith was doubted during his own lifetime. In the middle of the twentieth century some scholars even associated him with nihilism. To date, however, no one has offered a detailed account of Melville in relation to Nietzsche, who first made nihilism a topic of serious concern to the Western philosophical tradition. In this essay, I discuss some of the hitherto unexplored similarities between Melville’s ideas (...)
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  3. Socrates as Hoplite.Mark Anderson - 2005 - Ancient Philosophy 25 (2):273-289.
  4.  14
    Nietzsche's Subversive Rewritings of Phaedo-Platonism.Mark Anderson - 2017 - In Mark T. Conard (ed.), Nietzsche and the Philosophers. London, UK: Routledge. pp. 63-85.
  5.  24
    Molinism, Open Theism, and Soteriological Luck.Mark B. Anderson - 2011 - Religious Studies 47 (3):371-381.
    It is sometimes claimed by open theists that, on Molinism, God controls who is saved and who is damned and that, as a consequence, God's judgement of us is unjust. While this charge is usually lumped under the problem of evil, it could easily be classified under the problem of soteriological luck. I argue that the open theist is impugned by this latter problem. I then show that the Molinist has a solution to both problems and consider objections to that (...)
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  6.  4
    Platonic and Nietzschean Themes of Transformation in Moby-Dick.Mark Anderson - 2017 - In Corey McCall & Tom Nurmi (eds.), Melville Among the Philosophers. London, UK: pp. 25-44.
  7.  30
    Argumentative Norms in Republic I.Mark Anderson - 2006 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 13 (2):18-23.
    We argue that there are three norms of critical discussion in stark relief in Republic I. The first we see in the exchange with Cephalus---that we interpret each other and contribute to discussions in a maximally argumentative fashion. The second we seein the exchange with Polemarchus---that in order to cooperate in dialectic, interlocutors must maintain a distance between themselves and the theses they espouse. This way they can subject the views to serious scrutiny without the risk of personal loss. Third, (...)
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  8.  2
    Aardwolf Adaptations: A Review.Mark D. Anderson - 2004 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 59 (2):99-104.
  9.  34
    Ἀληθῆ Λέγεις: Speaking the Truth in Plato's Republic.Mark Anderson - 2010 - Ancient Philosophy 30 (2):247-260.
  10.  24
    Telling the Same Story of Nietzsche's Life.Mark Anderson - 2011 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 42 (1):105-120.
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  11.  5
    Melville and Nietzsche: Living the Death of God.Mark Anderson - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):59-75.
    Scholars long ago exposed the black vein of nihilism that runs through Herman Melville’s life and thought. But the majority of those who have endeavored to track its course have lacked the philosophical background prerequisite to a thorough exploration, and their works are now many years old.1 The most notable exception is All Things Shining, the recent effort of two professors of philosophy.2 Unfortunately, however, as I have previously argued in these pages, the authors of this book are less interested (...)
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  12.  3
    Selective Conscientious Objection.Mark Anderson & William O’Meara - 1988 - Philosophy Research Archives 14:1-19.
    The purpose of this paper is to consider the following three problems: Whether selective conscientious objection is morally reasonable in general; and if so, Whether selective conscientious objection should be recognized as a constitutional right by judicial interpretation; or Whether selective conscientious objection should become part of any new draft law that would be passed by Congress.
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  13.  7
    Melville in the Shallows.Mark Anderson - 2012 - Philosophy and Literature 36 (2):496-503.
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  14.  6
    On Professor Young, Again.Mark Anderson - 2012 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 43 (2):366-367.
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  15. Approaching Plato: A Guide to the Early and Middle Dialogues.Mark Anderson & Ginger Osborn - manuscript
    Approaching Plato is a comprehensive research guide to all (fifteen) of Plato’s early and middle dialogues. Each of the dialogues is covered with a short outline, a detailed outline (including some Greek text), and an interpretive essay. Also included (among other things) is an essay distinguishing Plato’s idea of eudaimonia from our contemporary notion of happiness and brief descriptions of the dialogues’ main characters.
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  16. Diamythologômen: A Philosophical Portrait of a Philosopher Philosophizing.Mark Anderson - forthcoming
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  17.  3
    Moby-Dick as Philosophy: Plato - Melville - Nietzsche.Mark Anderson - 2015 - Nashville, TN, USA: SPh Press.
    Moby-Dick as Philosophy is at base a chapter-by-chapter commentary on Herman Melville’s masterwork, Moby-Dick. The commentary form of the book subserves a higher end, the presentation of an ideal of the type philosopher. Superimposing portraits of Plato, Melville, and Nietzsche—the thinkers themselves, their ideas and their lives—it generates a composite image from the overlaying and interblending of figures. At a higher level still, the book is a meditation on the nature of philosophy and its relation to wisdom, and the relation (...)
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  18. Melancholie is een vorm van verzet. W.G. Sebald en de Duits-joodse herinnering.Mark M. Anderson - 2006 - Nexus 46.
    Aan de hand van het werk van de Duitse romancier W.G. Sebald breekt Mark Anderson een lans voor een herwaardering van de melancholie, als enig mogelijke houding om de last van het verleden die we moeten dragen, te kunnen torsen. De kunsten zijn het aangewezen instrument voor deze ‘daad van verzet’ ‘tegen de krachten van vernietiging en vergeten in het menselijk leven’. Het werk van Sebald, achtervolgd door de ‘postmemory’ aan het Duitse oorlogsgeweld dat hij zelf alleen indirect had meegemaakt, (...)
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  19. Oost, west, nergens thuis.Mark M. Anderson - 2000 - Nexus 26.
    Anderson beschrijft het kosmopolitisme als een omstreden kwestie in 'de culturele oorlogen van het hedendaagse Amerika' en gaat in op het 'niet-hegemonistische' begrip van het kosmopolitisme.
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  20. Plato and Nietzsche: Their Philosophical Art.Mark Anderson - 2014 - London, UK: Bloomsbury.
  21. Plato's "Myths".Mark Anderson - 2018 - In Carolina López-Ruiz (ed.), Gods, Heroes, and Monsters: A Sourcebook of Greek, Roman, and Near Eastern Myths in Translation. Oxford, UK:
    Translations of the “myths” from Plato’s Protagoras (320c-324d), Symposium (189c-193d), Republic (614b-621d), Timaeus (20d-25d and 29d-34b), and Kritias (108e-121c).
     
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  22. Twee generaties later. De dialoog tussen Duitsers en Joden.Mark M. Anderson - 2002 - Nexus 32.
    In het verwerkingsproces van de nazi-tijd heeft de samenwerking tussen Duitse en Amerikaanse germanisten een belangrijke rol gespeeld. De revival van de Exil-schrijvers is erdoor bevorderd, maar tegelijkertijd is hierdoor in beide landen een vertekening in de beeldvorming ontstaan.
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  23.  7
    Thinking Life: A Philosophical Fiction.Mark Anderson - 2018 - Nashville, TN, USA: SPh Press.
    Thinking Life is a narrative exploration of such themes as the decline of the contemporary university, man’s alienation from nature, modern melancholia, Dionysian intoxication, the relative value of knowledge, truth, and artistry in the life of the philosopher, and the creative construction of self. The author engages throughout with Plato and Nietzsche, with the Phaedo and The Gay Science in particular.
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  24.  7
    Zarathustra Stone: Friedrich Nietzsche in Sils-Maria, August 1881.Mark Anderson - 2016 - Nashville, TN, USA: SPh Press.
    Stylistically fictionalized but true to the salient facts, Zarathustra Stone relates the story of the day Friedrich Nietzsche thought the thought that changed his life, and that would, he believed, alter the course of western intellectual history. The Eternal Recurrence of the Same. Eternal Return. The narrative explains imaginatively the origin of Nietzsche’s idea, not only its philosophical roots, but its biographical, emotional, and psychological sources as well.
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