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Mark Baker [11]Mark C. Baker [7]Mark R. Baker [1]Mark D. Baker [1]
  1.  72
    Incorporation: A Theory of Grammatical Function Changing.Mark C. Baker - 1988 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
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  2. The Soul Hypothesis: Investigations Into the Existence of the Soul.Mark C. Baker & Stewart Goetz (eds.) - 2010 - Continuum Press.
  3. Thematic Roles and Syntactic Structure.Mark Baker - manuscript
    Suppose that one adopts a broadly Chomskyan perspective, in which there is a distinction between the language faculty and other cognitive faculties, including what Chomsky has recently called the “Conceptual-Intensional system”. Then there must in principle be at least three stages in this association that need to be understood. First, there is the nonlinguistic stage of conceptualizing a particular event.1 For example, while all of the participants in an event may be affected by the event in some way or another, (...)
     
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  4. Mood as Verbal Definiteness in a" Tenseless" Language.Mark Baker & Lisa Travis - 1997 - Natural Language Semantics 5 (3):213-269.
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  5.  21
    On the Absence of Certain Quantifiers in Mohawk.Mark C. Baker - 1995 - In Emmon Bach, Eloise Jelinek, Angelika Kratzer & Barbara Partee (eds.), Quantification in Natural Languages. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 21--58.
  6.  51
    The Innate Endowment for Language.Mark C. Baker - 2005 - In Peter Carruthers (ed.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. New York: Oxford University Press New York. pp. 156--174.
    This chapter examines two different views of universal grammar. Most linguists assume that universal grammar is underspecified — providing us with an incomplete grammar to be elaborated by learning. But the alternative is that it is overspecified — providing us with a full range of possible grammars from which we select one on the basis of environmental input. Underspecification is now the dominant view in the developmental sciences, and is often treated as the null hypothesis on grounds of greater possibility, (...)
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  7. Recovering the Scandal of the Cross: Atonement in New Testament and Contemporary Contexts.Joel B. Green & Mark D. Baker - 2000
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  8. The Innate Endowment for Language: Underspecified or Overspecified?Mark C. Baker - 2006 - In Peter Carruthers (ed.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. New York: Oxford University Press New York.
  9.  46
    On Perceiving God: Prospects for a Cognitive Science of Religious Experience.Mark Baker & Dean Zimmerman - 2019 - In Alvin Goldman & Brian P. McLaughlin (eds.), Metaphysics and Cognitive Science. Oxford University Press. pp. 125-154.
  10.  23
    Unmatched Chains and the Representation of Plural Pronouns.Mark C. Baker - 1992 - Natural Language Semantics 1 (1):33-73.
    Plural pronouns create the possibility of overlapping reference, which does not not fit naturally into the classical GB theory of anaphora, where each NP has a single integer as its referential index. Thus, one must either complicate the indexing system used in syntax or complicate the semantic interpretation of indices. This paper argues for the former approach based on the properties of a particular comitative-like construction found in Mohawk and certain other languages. This construction is analyzed as a type of (...)
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  11.  35
    Language Universals: Abstract but Not Mythological.Mark C. Baker - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):448-449.
    I present the so-called Verb-Object Constraint as a serious proposal for a true linguistic universal. It provides an example of the kind of abstraction in linguistic analysis that seems warranted, of how different languages can confirm such a universal in different ways, and why approaches that avoid all abstractness miss important linguistic generalizations.
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  12. On Zero Agreement and Polysynthesis.Mark Baker - manuscript
    Agreement morphology is the single most important way of satisfying this requirement, the other being incorporation. (1) implies that in a polysynthetic language like Mohawk, all verbs necessarily agreement with subjects, objects, and indirect objects, except for the special case when the direct object is incorporated into the verb. This accounts elegantly for paradigms like the following, found also in languages like Nahuatl and Chukchee.
     
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  13. On Gerunds and the Theory of Categories.Mark Baker - manuscript
    Some recent theories of gerunds account for their hybrid properties by saying that the gerund is both a noun and a verb simultaneously. Such theories are inconsistent with the Reference-Predication Constraint (RPC), a cornerstone of Baker’s (2003) theory of lexical categories. In contrast, I defend the traditional idea that gerunds are fusions of a true verb and a syntactically distinct nominal Infl. Moreover, I give new evidence in favor of the RPC, showing how it explains the fact that nominal gerunds (...)
     
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  14. Third International Workshop on Practical Aspects of High-Level Parallel Programming (PAPP 2006)-An Approach to Buffer Management in Java HPC Messaging.Mark Baker, Bryan Carpenter & Aamir Shafi - 2006 - In O. Stock & M. Schaerf (eds.), Lecture Notes in Computer Science. Springer Verlag. pp. 3992--953.
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  15. Mapping the Terrain of Language Learning.Mark Baker - manuscript
    Language learning and language typology are often studied separately, and it is common for experts in one area to know rather little about the other. This is not merely an unfortunate historical coincidence; there are some powerful practical reasons why it is so. The detailed study of language learning typically involves the experimental investigation of groups of people who are at various stages in the learning process—i.e., children. Hence it prototypically takes place at university daycares in North America, where the (...)
     
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  16. The Creative Aspect of Language Use and Nonbiological Nativism.Mark Baker - manuscript
    The Cognitive Science era can be divided into two distinct periods with respect to the topic of innateness, at least from the viewpoint of the linguist. The first period, which began in the late 1950s and was characterized by the work of people like Chomsky and Fodor, argued for reviving a nativist position, in which a substantial amount of people’s knowledge of language was innate rather than learned by association or induction or analogy. This constituted a break with the empiricist/behaviorist/structuralist (...)
     
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  17. On the Loci of Agreement: Inversion Constructions in Mapudungun.Mark Baker - manuscript
    “Languages are all the same, but not boringly so.” I think this is my own maxim, not one of the late great Kenneth Hale ’s. But it is nevertheless something that he taught me, by example, if not by explicit precept. Ken Hale believed passionately in a substantive notion of Universal Grammar that underlies all languages. But this did not blind him to the details—even the idiosyncrasies—of less-studied “local” languages. On the contrary, I believe it stimulated his famous zeal for (...)
     
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  18. On Verb-Initial and Verb-Final Word Orders in Lokaa.Mark Baker - manuscript
    Verb phrases seems to be head initial in affirmative sentences in Lokaa (a Niger-Congo language of the Cross River area of Nigeria) but head final in negative clauses and gerunds. This article aspires to give a comprehensive description of this phenomenon, together with a theoretical analysis. It considers how a full range of grammatical elements are ordered in both kinds of clauses—including direct objects, second objects, particles, weak pronouns, complement clauses, serial verbs, adverbs, prepositional phrases, tense/mood particles, and auxiliary verbs. (...)
     
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  19. The Natures of Nonconfigurationality.Mark Baker - 2001 - In Mark Baltin & Chris Collins (eds.), The Handbook of Contemporary Syntactic Theory. Blackwell. pp. 407--438.
     
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  20.  2
    Effects of Diazepam on Reaction Times to Stop and Go.Swagata Sarkar, Supriyo Choudhury, Nazrul Islam, Mohammad Shah Jahirul Hoque Chowdhury, Md Tauhidul Islam Chowdhury, Mark R. Baker, Stuart N. Baker & Hrishikesh Kumar - 2020 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 14.