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Mark Bernstein [44]Mark H. Bernstein [11]Mark Howard Bernstein [1]
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Mark Bernstein
Purdue University
  1.  29
    On Pandemics and the Duty to Care: Whose Duty? Who Cares?Carly Ruderman, C. Shawn Tracy, Cécile M. Bensimon, Mark Bernstein, Laura Hawryluck, Randi Z. Shaul & Ross E. G. Upshur - 2006 - BMC Medical Ethics 7 (1):5.
    BackgroundAs a number of commentators have noted, SARS exposed the vulnerabilities of our health care systems and governance structures. Health care professionals and hospital systems that bore the brunt of the SARS outbreak continue to struggle with the aftermath of the crisis. Indeed, HCPs – both in clinical care and in public health – were severely tested by SARS. Unprecedented demands were placed on their skills and expertise, and their personal commitment to their profession was severely tried. Many were exposed (...)
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  2.  48
    On Pandemics and the Duty to Care: Whose Duty? Who Cares? [REVIEW]Carly Ruderman, C. Tracy, Cécile Bensimon, Mark Bernstein, Laura Hawryluck, Randi Zlotnik Shaul & Ross Upshur - 2006 - BMC Medical Ethics 7 (1):1-6.
    Background As a number of commentators have noted, SARS exposed the vulnerabilities of our health care systems and governance structures. Health care professionals (HCPs) and hospital systems that bore the brunt of the SARS outbreak continue to struggle with the aftermath of the crisis. Indeed, HCPs – both in clinical care and in public health – were severely tested by SARS. Unprecedented demands were placed on their skills and expertise, and their personal commitment to their profession was severely tried. Many (...)
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  3.  10
    Free Will and Values.Mark Bernstein - 1989 - Noûs 23 (4):557-559.
  4. Opportunistic Carnivorism.Michael J. Almeida & Mark H. Bernstein - 2000 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (2):205–211.
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  5. Personal Identity, Enhancement and Neurosurgery: A Qualitative Study in Applied Neuroethics.Nir Lipsman, Rebecca Zener & Mark Bernstein - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (6):375-383.
    Recent developments in the field of neurosurgery, specifically those dealing with the modification of mood and affect as part of psychiatric disease, have led some researchers to discuss the ethical implications of surgery to alter personality and personal identity. As knowledge and technology advance, discussions of surgery to alter undesirable traits, or possibly the enhancement of normal traits, will play an increasingly larger role in the ethical literature. So far, identity and enhancement have yet to be explored in a neurosurgical (...)
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  6.  62
    Marginal Cases and Moral Relevance.Mark Bernstein - 2002 - Journal of Social Philosophy 33 (4):523–539.
  7.  26
    Informed Consent for Clinical Trials of Deep Brain Stimulation in Psychiatric Disease: Challenges and Implications for Trial Design: Table 1.Nir Lipsman, Peter Giacobbe, Mark Bernstein & Andres M. Lozano - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (2):107-111.
    Advances in neuromodulation and an improved understanding of the anatomy and circuitry of psychopathology have led to a resurgence of interest in surgery for psychiatric disease. Clinical trials exploring deep brain stimulation (DBS), a focally targeted, adjustable and reversible form of neurosurgery, are being developed to address the use of this technology in highly selected patient populations. Psychiatric patients deemed eligible for surgical intervention, such as DBS, typically meet stringent inclusion criteria, including demonstrated severity, chronicity and a failure of conventional (...)
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  8. Neo-Speciesism.Mark Bernstein - 2004 - Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (3):380–390.
  9. Contractualism and Animals.Mark Bernstein - 1997 - Philosophical Studies 86 (1):49-72.
  10. Without a Tear: Our Tragic Relationship with Animals.Mark H. Bernstein - 2004 - University of Illinois Press.
    The principle of gratuitous suffering -- The value of humans and the value of animals -- The holocaust of factory farming -- Hunting -- Animal experimentation -- The law and animals -- Women and animals.
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  11. Can We Ever Be Really, Truly, Ultimately, Free?Mark Bernstein - 2005 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 29 (1):1-12.
  12. Rollbacks, Endorsements, and Indeterminism.Mike Almeida & Mark H. Bernstein - 2010 - In The Oxford Handbook of Free Will, 2nd Edition. Oxford, UK: pp. 484-498.
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  13.  50
    Kanean Libertarianism.Mark Bernstein - 1995 - Southwest Philosophy Review 11 (1):151-57.
  14.  96
    On the Relative Value of Human and Animal Lives.Mark Bernstein - 2017 - Philosophical Studies 174 (6):1517-1538.
    It has become virtually a matter of dogma—among both philosophers and laypersons—that human lives are more valuable than animal lives. One argument for this claim dominates the philosophical literature and, despite its employment by a host of philosophers, should be found wanting. I try to show that this line of reasoning, as well as one that is less popular but still with significant appeal, are faulty. The errors in each argument seem fatal: the pervasive argument begs the question, and the (...)
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  15.  28
    Well-Being.Mark Bernstein - 1998 - American Philosophical Quarterly 35 (1):39 - 55.
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  16.  17
    Neo‐Speciesism.Mark Bernstein - 2004 - Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (3):380-390.
  17.  7
    Kanean Libertarianism.Mark Bernstein - 1995 - Southwest Philosophy Review 11 (1):151-157.
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  18.  11
    Agency and Integrality.Mark H. Bernstein - 1989 - Noûs 23 (3):391-394.
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  19. Friends Without Favoritism.Mark Bernstein - 2007 - Journal of Value Inquiry 41 (1):59-76.
  20.  42
    Love, Particularity, and Selfhood.Mark Bernstein - 1985 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 23 (3):287-293.
  21.  20
    Launching Invasive, First-in-Human Trials Against Parkinson’s Disease: Ethical Considerations.Jonathan Kimmelman, Alex John London, Bernard Ravina, Tim Ramsay, Mark Bernstein, Alan Fine, Frank W. Stahnisch & Marina Elena Emborg - unknown
    The decision to initiate invasive, first-in-human trials involving Parkinson’s disease presents a vexing ethical challenge. Such studies present significant surgical risks, and high degrees of uncertainty about intervention risks and biological effects. We argue that maintaining a favorable riskbenefit balance in such circumstances requires a higher than usual degree of confidence that protocols will lead to significant direct and/or social benefits. One critical way of promoting such confidence is through the application of stringent evidentiary standards for preclinical studies. We close (...)
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  22.  13
    Love, Particularity, and Selfhood.Mark Bernstein - 1985 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 23 (3):287-293.
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  23.  41
    On the Dogma of Hierarchical Value.Mark Bernstein - 2006 - American Philosophical Quarterly 43 (3):207 - 220.
  24.  90
    Moral and Epistemic Saints.Mark Bernstein - 1986 - Metaphilosophy 17 (2-3):102-108.
  25.  50
    Explaining Evil.Mark Bernstein - 1998 - Religious Studies 34 (2):151-163.
    In the past few years, the focus of arguments against theism has shifted. Where previously the existence of evil has been thought by many demonstrative of the impossibility of God's existence, now it is frequently purveyed as merely evidence against the existence of a Supreme Being. Even this more modest claim has been forcefully denied by William Alston and Peter van Inwagen. I argue that their arguments are not persuasive. Not only do they suffer logical flaws but, if accepted, actually (...)
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  26.  93
    I Involutional Determinism.Mark Bernstein - 1988 - The Monist 71 (3):358-364.
    One tolerably clear statement of Determinism has it that all events are caused. Expanded upon, this thesis has been taken as the claim that the existence of any event E1, has a set of events, E2 … En which antedate E1, and which are causally sufficient for the occurrence of E1. That is, given the occurrence of E2 … En, E1 is causally necessary. I would hardly wish to claim that this is the only plausible statement of the doctrine of (...)
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  27.  54
    The Moral Complexities of Eating Meat.Mark Bernstein - 2017 - Journal of Animal Ethics 7 (2):198-203.
    The Moral Complexities of Eating Meat is a welcome addition to the growing literature on the moral issues revolving around our eating habits. While much of the volume concerns the so-called causal impotence argument— the idea that since, as individuals, we do little to add to the harm imposed on animals, some opportunistic carnivorism on our parts is not blameworthy—there are thought-provoking essays running the gamut from defending the practice of meat eating more generally to insisting that strict vegetarianism is (...)
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  28. Fatalism, Tense, and Changing the Past.Mark Bernstein - 1989 - Philosophical Studies 56 (2):175 - 186.
  29.  55
    Animal Pragmatism: Rethinking Human-Nonhuman Relationships. [REVIEW]Mark Bernstein - 2006 - Environmental Ethics 28 (1):107-110.
  30. Is It Impossible to Relieve Suffering?Michael Almeida & Mark Bernstein - 2005 - Philosophia 32 (1-4):313-324.
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  31. Fatalism and Time.Mark Bernstein - 1989 - Dialogue 28 (3):461-.
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  32.  81
    Socialization and Autonomy.Mark H. Bernstein - 1983 - Mind 92 (January):120-123.
    A problem closely related to the perennial free will question is whether autonomy of persons can be reconciled with socialization. If this latter compatibilism can be established, It would have great bearing on the more general issue of freedom being reconcilable with determinism. In several recent articles robert young has tried to demonstrate the consistency of autonomy with socialization, But the author argues that he has failed to notice the depth and global nature of the socialization critic's position, And as (...)
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  33.  63
    L. W. Sumner, Welfare, Happiness and Ethics:Welfare, Happiness and Ethics.Mark Bernstein - 2001 - Ethics 111 (2):441-443.
  34.  39
    Challenges and Defense.Mark Bernstein - 2010 - Philo 13 (1):94-111.
  35. The Oxford Handbook of Free Will, 2nd Edition.Mike Almeida & Mark H. Bernstein - 2010
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  36. Duty and the Beast: Should We Eat Meat in the Name of Animal Rights?Mark Bernstein - 2020 - Journal of Animal Ethics 10 (1):86-89.
  37. Review of Robert Kane, Free Will and Values. [REVIEW]Mark Bernstein - 1989 - Noûs 23 (4):557-559.
     
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  38.  1
    Evaluating the Value of Animals and Humans.Mark H. Bernstein - 2019 - Journal of Animal Ethics 9 (1):66-75.
    Received opinion attributes greater value to the lives of humans than to the lives of animals. Arguably, this conviction allows the continuation of the institutions of factory farming, hunting, and animal experimentation. After all, if we believe that the value of animal lives is at least equal to the value of human lives, we would presumably be quick to renounce and abolish these activities. My aim is to show that we have no good reason to sustain our common belief in (...)
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  39.  39
    Robert Kane, Through the Moral Maze.Mark Bernstein - 1995 - Southwest Philosophy Review 11 (2):267-274.
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  40.  9
    Comparing the Wrongness of Killing Humans and Killing Animals.Mark H. Bernstein - 2018 - In Andrew Linzey & Clair Linzey (eds.), The Palgrave Handbook of Practical Animal Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan Uk. pp. 349-361.
    Virtually all persons—philosophers and laypersons alike—agree that, special circumstances aside, killing humans is more morally objectionable than killing animals. I argue for a radical inversion of this dogma: all else being equal, killing nonhuman animals is more morally objectionable than killing humans. We will discover that the dominant reason for the pervasive belief that killing humans is worse than killing animals—that the human kind of animal uniquely has the capacities for self-consciousness and self-reflection—can be implemented to demonstrate the very opposite (...)
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  41.  47
    Should a Medecal/Surgical Specialist with Formal Training in Bioethics Provide Health Care Ethics Consultation in His/Her Own Area of Speciallity?Mark Bernstein & Kerry Bowman - 2003 - HEC Forum 15 (3):274-286.
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  42. AGICH, GEORGE, J. Joining the Team: Ethics Consultation at the Cleveland Clinic.Richard L. Allman, Mark Bernstein, Kerry Bowman Should, Kerry Bowman, Mark Bernstein Should & Munchausen Syndrome Proxy - 2003 - HEC Forum 15 (4):386-388.
     
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  43. Moral Responsibility and Free Will.Mark Bernstein - 1981 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 19 (1):1-10.
  44.  32
    Towards a More Expansive Moral Community.Mark Bernstein - 1992 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 9 (1):45-52.
  45.  29
    Robert Kane, the Significance of Free Will.Mark Bernstein - 1997 - Southwest Philosophy Review 13 (2):171-172.
  46.  21
    ”Animals and the Moral Community: Mental Life, Moral Status, and Kinship by Gary Steiner Animals and the Moral Community: Mental Life, Moral Status, and Kinship Steiner Gary Columbia U Niversity Press„ New York, N Y 978-0-231-14234-2. [REVIEW]Mark H. Bernstein - 2011 - Journal of Animal Ethics 1 (1):96-98.
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  47.  10
    Research Consent for Deep Brain Stimulation in Treatment-Resistant Depression: Balancing Risk With Patient Expectations.Nir Lipsman, Mary Pat McAndrews, Andres M. Lozano & Mark Bernstein - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 2 (1):39-41.
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  48.  10
    Book ReviewsL. W. Sumner, Welfare, Happiness and Ethics. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996. Pp. 239. $24.95.Mark Bernstein - 2001 - Ethics 111 (2):441-443.
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  49.  17
    A Response to MacClellan.Mark H. Bernstein - 2013 - Journal of Animal Ethics 3 (1):69-71.
    In "Size Matters" in this issue, Joel MacClellan argues for three claims: according to utilitarianism, faced with a choice of eating large or small animals, we should eat the large; utilitarianism may ground obligations to eat meat; and we justifiably attract greater moral responsibility for the "direct" killing of our food animals than we do for "indirect" killing. MacClellan tends to underestimate the resources available even to hedonistic utilitarianism and oversimplifies the conditions in the food industry. His second claim has (...)
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  50.  80
    Fatalism Revisited.Mark Bernstein - 1990 - Metaphilosophy 21 (3):270-281.
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