Results for 'Mark C. Noort'

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  1.  8
    Walking the Plank: An Experimental Paradigm to Investigate Safety Voice.Mark C. Noort, Tom W. Reader & Alex Gillespie - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  2.  25
    Beyond “Monologicality”? Exploring Conspiracist Worldviews.Bradley Franks, Adrian Bangerter, Martin W. Bauer, Matthew Hall & Mark C. Noort - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
  3. Hobbes on the Evil of Death by Mark C. Murphy (Washington, DC).Mark C. Murphy - 2000 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 28:36.
  4.  29
    FINNIS ON NATURE, REASON, GOD: Mark C. Murphy.Mark C. Murphy - 2007 - Legal Theory 13 (3-4):187-209.
    It is often claimed that John Finnis's natural law theory is detachable from the ultimate theistic explanation that he offers in the final chapter of Natural Law and Natural Rights. My aim in this paper is to think through the question of the detachability of Finnis's theistic explanation of the natural law from the remainder of his natural law view, both in Natural Law and Natural Rights and beyond. I argue that Finnis's theistic explanation of the natural law as actually (...)
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  5. Image: Three Inquiries in Technology and Imagination.Mark C. Taylor, Mary-Jane Rubenstein & Thomas A. Carlson (eds.) - 2021 - London: University of Chicago Press.
    What are the primary characteristics that define what it means to be human? And what happens to those characteristics in the face of technology past, present, and future? The three essays in Image, by leading philosophers of religion Mark Taylor, Mary-Jane Rubenstein, and Thomas Carlson, play at this intersection of the human and the technological, building out from Heidegger's notion that humans master the world by picturing or representing the real.Taylor's essay traces a history of capitalism, dwelling on the (...)
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  6.  17
    Mark C. Murphy, God's Own Ethics: Norms of Divine Agency and the Argument From Evil. Reviewed By. [REVIEW]Mark Satta - 2018 - Philosophy in Review 38 (2):73-75.
  7. Wendy C. Hamblet, The Sacred Monstrous: A Reflection on Violence in Human Communities Reviewed By.Mark C. Vopat - 2005 - Philosophy in Review 25 (3):186-187.
  8. On the Other Dialogue and/or Dialectics : Mark Taylor's "Paralectics".Mark C. Taylor, Robert P. Scharlemann, Roy Wagner, Michael Brint & Richard Rorty - 1991
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  9.  15
    God's Own Ethics: Norms of Divine Agency and the Argument From Evil.Mark C. Murphy - 2017 - Oxford University Press.
    Mark C. Murphy addresses the question of how God's ethics differs from human ethics. Murphy suggests that God is not subject to the moral norms to which we humans are subject. This has immediate implications for the argument from evil: we cannot assume that an absolutely perfect being is in any way bound to prevent the evils of this world.
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  10. About Religion: Economies of Faith in Virtual Culture.Mark C. Taylor - 1999 - University of Chicago Press.
    "Religion," Mark C. Taylor maintains, "is most interesting where it is least obvious." From global financial networks to the casinos of Las Vegas, from images flickering on computer terminals to steel sculpture, material culture bears unexpected traces of the divine. In a world where the economies of faith are obscure, yet pervasive, Taylor shows that approaching religion directly is less instructive than thinking about it. Traveling from high culture to pop culture and back again, About Religion approaches cyberspace and (...)
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  11.  97
    God and Moral Law: On the Theistic Explanation of Morality.Mark C. Murphy - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    Does God's existence make a difference to how we explain morality? Mark C. Murphy critiques the two dominant theistic accounts of morality--natural law theory and divine command theory--and presents a novel third view. He argues that we can value natural facts about humans and their good, while keeping God at the centre of our moral explanations.
  12. Natural Law in Jurisprudence and Politics.Mark C. Murphy - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Natural law is a perennial though poorly represented and understood issue in political philosophy and the philosophy of law. In this 2006 book, Mark C. Murphy argues that the central thesis of natural law jurisprudence - that law is backed by decisive reasons for compliance - sets the agenda for natural law political philosophy, demonstrating how law gains its binding force by way of the common good of the political community. Murphy's work ranges over the central questions of natural (...)
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  13. Social Science in the Crucible the American Debate Over Objectivity and Purpose, 1918-1941.Mark C. Smith - 1994
    The 1920s and 30s were key decades for the history of American social science. The success of such quantitative disciplines as economics and psychology during World War I forced social scientists to reexamine their methods and practices and to consider recasting their field as a more objective science separated from its historical foundation in social reform. The debate that ensued, fiercely conducted in books, articles, correspondence, and even presidential addresses, made its way into every aspect of social science thought of (...)
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  14.  35
    The Moment of Complexity: Emerging Network Culture.Mark C. Taylor - 2001 - University of Chicago Press.
    "_The Moment of Complexity_ is a profoundly original work. In remarkable and insightful ways, Mark Taylor traces an entirely new way to view the evolution of our culture, detailing how information theory and the scientific concept of complexity can be used to understand recent developments in the arts and humanities. This book will ultimately be seen as a classic."-John L. Casti, Santa Fe Institute, author of _Gödel: A Life of Logic, the Mind, and Mathematics_ The science of complexity accounts (...)
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  15.  19
    After God.Mark C. Taylor - 2007 - University of Chicago Press.
    With fundamentalists dominating the headlines and scientists arguing about the biological and neurological basis of faith, religion is the topic of the day. But religion, Mark C. Taylor shows, is more complicated than either its defenders or critics think and, indeed, is much more influential than any of us realize. Our world, Taylor maintains, is shaped by religion even when it is least obvious. Faith and value, he insists, are unavoidable and inextricably interrelated for believers and nonbelievers alike. Using (...)
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  16.  15
    Hiding.Mark C. Taylor - 1997 - University of Chicago Press.
    The age of information, media, and virtuality is transforming every aspect of human experience. Questions that have long haunted the philosophical imagination are becoming urgent practical concerns: Where does the natural end and the artificial begin? Is there a difference between the material and the immaterial? In his new work, Mark C. Taylor extends his ongoing investigation of postmodern worlds by critically examining a wide range of contemporary cultural practices. Nothing defines postmodernism so well as its refusal of depth, (...)
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  17.  14
    Nots.Mark C. Taylor - 1993 - University of Chicago Press.
    Nots is a virtuoso exploration of negation and negativity in theology, philosophy, art, architecture, postmodern culture, and medicine. In nine essays that range from nihility in Buddhism to the embodiment of negativity in disease, Mark C. Taylor looks at the surprising ways in which contrasting concepts of negativity intersect. In the first section of this book, Taylor discusses the question of the "not" in the religious thought of Anselm, Hegel, Derrida, and Nishitani. In the second part, he analyzes artistic (...)
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  18.  2
    Mystic Bones.Mark C. Taylor - 2007 - University of Chicago Press.
    The desert has long been a theme in Mark C. Taylor’s work, from his inquiries into the religious significance of Las Vegas to his writings on earthworks artist Michael Heizer. At once haunted by absence and loss, the desert, for Taylor, is a place of exile and wandering, of temptation and tribulation. Bones, in turn, speak to his abiding interest in remnants, ruins, ritual, and immanence. Taylor combines his fascination in the detritus of the desert and its philosophical significance (...)
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  19.  3
    Speed Limits: Where Time Went and Why We Have so Little Left.Mark C. Taylor - 2014 - Yale University Press.
    _A leading thinker asks why “faster” is synonymous with “better” in our hurried world and suggests how to take control of our runaway lives_ We live in an ever-accelerating world: faster computers, markets, food, fashion, product cycles, minds, bodies, kids, lives. When did everything start moving so fast? Why does speed seem so inevitable? Is faster always better? Drawing together developments in religion, philosophy, art, technology, fashion, and finance, Mark C. Taylor presents an original and rich account of a (...)
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  20. Mark C. Taylor, Altarity Reviewed By.Wilhelm S. Wurzer - 1989 - Philosophy in Review 9 (7):290-293.
     
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  21.  3
    Mark C. Taylor, Tears.Theodore Kisiel - 2010 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 2 (1-2):61-66.
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  22. Mark C. Taylor, nOts. [REVIEW]John King-Farlow - 1994 - Philosophy in Review 14:215-217.
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  23. Mark C. Taylor, nOts Reviewed By.John King-Farlow - 1994 - Philosophy in Review 14 (3):215-217.
     
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  24.  38
    God and Moral Obligation, by C. Stephen Evans. [REVIEW]Mark C. Murphy - 2014 - Faith and Philosophy 31 (1):112-117.
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  25.  21
    Philosophy Comes to Dinner: Arguments About the Ethics of Eating, Edited by Andrew Chignell, Terence Cuneo, and Matthew C. Halteman.Mark C. Navin - 2017 - Teaching Philosophy 40 (4):490-492.
  26.  18
    Amodio, Mark C., Ed. New Directions in Oral Theory: Essays on Ancient and Medieval Literatures. Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies 287. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2005. X+ 341 Pp. Cloth, $40. [REVIEW]Flemming Gorm Andersen, Judith M. Barringer, Jeffrey M. Hurwit, Francesco Bertolini & Fabio Gasti - 2006 - American Journal of Philology 127:153-157.
  27. Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Mark C. E. Peterson, Abrahim H. Khan, Charles Creegan, Matthew J. Mancini, Delno C. West & Daniel A. Dombrowski - 1989 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 25 (2).
     
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  28. Now You See It, Now You Don't: Preventing Consciousness with Visual Masking.Mark C. Price - 2001 - In Peter G. Grossenbacher (ed.), Finding Consciousness in the Brain: A Neurocognitive Approach. Advances in Consciousness Research. John Benjamins. pp. 25-60.
  29.  58
    Should We Expect to Feel as If We Understand Consciousness?Mark C. Price - 1996 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 3 (4):303-12.
    We tend to assume that progress in answering the ‘hard question’ of consciousness will be accompanied by a subjective feeling of greater understanding. However, in order to feel we understand how one state of affairs arises from another, we have to deceive ourselves into thinking we have found a type of causal link which in reality may not exist . I draw from and expand upon Rosch's model, which specifies the conditions under which this self-deceptive kind of causal attribution arises. (...)
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  30. Mark C. Taylor, Tears Reviewed By.William A. Shearson - 1992 - Philosophy in Review 12 (1):65-66.
     
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  31. Mark C. Taylor, Journeys to Selfhood: Hegel and Kierkegaard Reviewed By.W. A. Shearson - 1982 - Philosophy in Review 2 (1):33-36.
     
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  32.  48
    Nietzsche as Instructor in Autonomy?: Comments.Mark C. Fowler - 1990 - International Studies in Philosophy 22 (2):13-16.
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  33.  28
    Beware of Latter-Day “Stoics”: Comments on Freeman.Mark C. Fowler - 1988 - International Studies in Philosophy 20 (2):15-18.
  34. The Soul Hypothesis: Investigations Into the Existence of the Soul.Mark C. Baker & Stewart Goetz (eds.) - 2010 - Continuum Press.
  35. The Innate Endowment for Language: Underspecified or Overspecified?Mark C. Baker - 2006 - In Peter Carruthers (ed.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. New York: Oxford University Press New York.
  36.  72
    Incorporation: A Theory of Grammatical Function Changing.Mark C. Baker - 1988 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
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  37.  21
    On the Absence of Certain Quantifiers in Mohawk.Mark C. Baker - 1995 - In Emmon Bach, Eloise Jelinek, Angelika Kratzer & Barbara Partee (eds.), Quantification in Natural Languages. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 21--58.
  38. Deconstruction in Context: Literature and Philosophy.Mark C. Taylor (ed.) - 1986 - University of Chicago Press.
    "There is no rigorous and effective deconstruction without the faithful memory of philosophies and literatures, without the respectful and competent reading of texts of the past, as well as singular works of our own time. Deconstruction is also a certain thinking about tradition and context. Mark Taylor evokes this with great clarity in the course of a remarkable introduction. He reconstitutes a set of premises without which no deconstruction could have seen the light of day." – _Jacques Derrida __"This (...)
     
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  39.  17
    Religious Conscientious Objection and World War One.Mark C. Leaman - 2000 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 10 (2):79-106.
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  40.  3
    Mark C. Lenssen, 1949-1999.Suzanne Morrison - 2000 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 73 (5):251 - 252.
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  41. Alasdair Macintyre.Mark C. Murphy (ed.) - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    The contribution to contemporary philosophy of Alasdair MacIntyre is enormous. His writings on ethics, political philosophy, philosophy of religion, philosophy of the social sciences and the history of philosophy have established him as one of the philosophical giants of the last fifty years. His best-known book, After Virtue, spurred the profound revival of virtue ethics. Moreover, MacIntyre, unlike so many of his contemporaries, has exerted a deep influence beyond the bourns of academic philosophy. This volume focuses on the major themes (...)
     
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  42.  2
    Ln a 1991 Interview, Alasdair Maclntyre Summarized the History of His Own Philosophical Work as Follows: My Life as an Academic Philosopher Falls Into Three Parts. The Twenty-Two Years From 1949, When L Became a Graduate Student of Philosophy at Manchester University, Until 1971 Were a Period, as It Now Appears. [REVIEW]Mark C. Murphy - 2003 - In Alasdair Macintyre. Cambridge University Press. pp. 1.
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  43.  5
    Introduction of the Aquinas Medalist Alasdair MacIntyre.Mark C. Murphy - 2010 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 84:19-21.
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  44.  3
    Hobbes’s Shortsightedness Account of Conflict.Mark C. Murphy - 1993 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 31 (2):239-253.
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  45.  8
    Functioning and Flourishing.Mark C. Murphy - 1999 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 73:193-206.
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  46.  18
    Deviant Uses of "Obligation" in Hobbes' "Leviathan".Mark C. Murphy - 1994 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 11 (3):281 - 294.
  47.  35
    Dancy, Jonathan. Practical Reality.Mark C. Murphy - 2001 - Review of Metaphysics 55 (2):388-390.
  48. Defect and Deviance in Natural Law Jurisprudence.Mark C. Murphy - 2012 - In Matthias Klatt (ed.), Institutionalized Reason: The Jurisprudence of Robert Alexy. Oxford University Press.
  49.  8
    The Conscience Principle.Mark C. Murphy - 1997 - Journal of Philosophical Research 22:387-407.
    My aim is to defend the conscience principle: One ought never to act against the dictates of one’s conscience. In the first part of this paper, I explain what I mean by “conscience” and “dictate of conscience,” and I show that the notion that the conscience principle is inherently anti-authoritarian or inherently fanatical is mistaken. In the second part, I argue that the existence of mistaken conscience does not reduce the conscience principle to absurdity. In the third part, I present (...)
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  50.  60
    The Common Good.Mark C. Murphy - 2005 - Review of Metaphysics 59 (1):3 - 18.
    NATURAL LAW ARGUMENTS CONCERNING the political order characteristically appeal, at some point or other, to the common good of the political community. To take the clearest example: Aquinas, perhaps the paradigmatic natural law theorist, appeals to the common good in his accounts of the definition of law, of the need for political authority, of the moral requirement to adhere to the dictates issued by political authority, and of the form political authority should take. But while united on the point that (...)
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