Results for 'Mark Child'

1000+ found
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  1.  9
    Autonomy or Heteronomy? Levinas's Challenge to Modernism and Postmodernism.Mark Child, David D. Williams, A. Jane Birch & Robert M. Boody - 1995 - Educational Theory 45 (2):167-189.
  2.  76
    Putting the War Back in Just War Theory: A Critique of Examples.Rigstad Mark - 2017 - Ethical Perspectives 24 (1):123-144.
    Analytic just war theorists often attempt to construct ideal theories of military justice on the basis of intuitions about imaginary and sometimes outlandish examples, often taken from non-military contexts. This article argues for a sharp curtailment of this method and defends, instead, an empirically and historically informed approach to the ethical scrutiny of armed conflicts. After critically reviewing general philosophical reasons for being sceptical of the moral-theoretic value of imaginary hypotheticals, the article turns to some of the special problems that (...)
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  3.  1
    Profit: The Concept and Its Moral Features: JAMES W. CHILD.James W. Child - 1998 - Social Philosophy and Policy 15 (2):243-282.
    Profit is a concept that both causes and manifests deep conflict and division. It is not merely that people disagree over whether it is good or bad. The very meaning of the concept and its role in competing theories necessitates the deepest possible disagreement; people cannot agree on what profit is. Still, simply learning the starkly different sentiments expressed about profit gives us some feel for the depth of the conflict. Friends of capitalism have praised profit as central to the (...)
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  4.  9
    Reimagining the Unimaginable? Reflections on Mark A. Drumbl’s Vision of Child Soldiers.Steven Freeland & Pernille Walther - 2017 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 11 (1):37-48.
    The existence of child soldiers is a problem of the ages, and there are no positive signs that it is abating. The difference now is that, with the development of modern weapons technology, children can be involved in large scale and horrific acts during conflicts. The circumstances surrounding the use of children to wage war will vary from situation to situation. Yet, it has been suggested that many people seem to have a ‘single focussed’ view of what child (...)
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  5.  37
    Two Child Narrators: Defamiliarization, Empathy, and Reader-Response in Mark Haddon's The Curious Incident and Emma Donoghue's Room.Marco Caracciolo - 2014 - Semiotica 2014 (202).
    Name der Zeitschrift: Semiotica Jahrgang: 2014 Heft: 202 Seiten: 183-205.
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  6.  2
    Book Review:Mental Development in the Child and in the Race; Methods and Processes. J. Mark Baldwin. [REVIEW]G. A. Tawney - 1897 - Ethics 7 (4):517-.
  7. Mental Development in the Child and Race, by J. Mark Baldwin. [REVIEW]G. A. Tawney - 1896 - Ethics 7:517.
     
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  8. Mental Development in the Child and in the Race; Methods and Processes.J. Mark Baldwin.G. A. Tawney - 1897 - International Journal of Ethics 7 (4):517-522.
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  9. The Later Mercantilists Josiah Child and John Locke.Mark Blaug - 1991
  10.  13
    Reimagining Child Soldiers in International Law and Policy.Mark A. Drumbl - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Child soldiers are generally perceived as faultless, passive victims. This ignores that the roles of child soldiers vary, from innocent abductee to wilful perpetrator. This book argues that child soldiers should be judged on their actions and that treating them like a homogenous group prevents them from taking responsibility for their acts.
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  11.  6
    Care Ethics in Residential Child Care: A Different Voice.Laura Steckley & Mark Smith - 2011 - Ethics and Social Welfare 5 (2):181-195.
    Despite the centrality of the term within the title, the meaning of ?care? in residential child care remains largely unexplored. Shifting discourses of residential child care have taken it from the private into the public domain. Using a care ethics perspective, we argue that public care needs to move beyond its current instrumental focus to articulate a broader ontological purpose, informed by what is required to promote children's growth and flourishing. This depends upon the establishment of caring relationships (...)
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  12.  28
    Procreation for Donation: The Moral and Political Permissibility of “Having a Child to Save a Child”.Mark P. Aulisio, Thomas May & Geoffrey D. Block - 2001 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (4):408-419.
    The crisis in donor organ and tissue supply is one of the most difficult challenges for transplant today. New policy initiatives, such as the driver's license option and requiredrequest, have been implemented in many states, with other initiatives, such as mandatedchoice and presumedconsent, proposed in the hopes of ameliorating this crisis. At the same time, traditional acquisition of organs from human cadavers has been augmented by living human donors, and nonheartbeating human donors, as well as experimental animal and artificial sources. (...)
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  13.  4
    Knowing Levels and the Child's Understanding of Mind.Robert L. Campbell & Mark H. Bickhard - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):33.
  14.  10
    The Battle for Credibility-Themes in the Cross Examination of Child Victim Witnesses.Mark Brennan - 1994 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 7 (1):51-73.
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  15.  21
    What Even a Child Would Know.Mark L. McPherran - 2005 - Ancient Philosophy 25 (1):49-63.
  16.  1
    Mental Development in the Child and the Race. Methods and Process.James Mark Baldwin - 1895 - Philosophical Review 4 (2):232.
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  17.  4
    Child Abuse and Neglect.Mark C. Vopat - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  18. Mental Development in the Child and the Rate; Methods and Processes.J. Mark Baldwin - 1896 - Philosophical Review 5 (2):218-219.
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  19.  4
    Shift Recording in Residential Child Care.Mark Hardy - 2012 - Ethics and Social Welfare 6 (1):88-96.
  20.  1
    Use of Maternal–Child Health Services and Contraception in Guatemala and Panama.Charles W. Warren, Richard S. Monteith, J. Timothy Johnson, Roberto Santiso, Federico Guerra & Mark W. Oberle - 1987 - Journal of Biosocial Science 19 (2):229.
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  21. Ental Development in the Child and the Race. [REVIEW]James Mark Baldwin - 1894 - Ancient Philosophy 5:633.
     
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  22. Mental Development in the Child and in the Race; Methods and Processes.J. Mark Baldwin - 1897 - International Journal of Ethics 7 (4):517-522.
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  23. Mental Development in the Child and the Race.James Mark Baldwin - 1894 - The Monist 5:633.
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  24. Mental Development in the Child and the Race. Methods and Processes.James Mark Baldwin - 1896 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 4 (5):670-699.
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  25. ‘What Even a Child Would Know’: Socrates, Luck, and Providence at Euthydemus 277d-282e.Mark L. Mcpherran - 2005 - Ancient Philosophy 25 (1):49-63.
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  26. Mental Development in the Child and the Race.F. Tracy & James Mark Baldwin - 1895 - Philosophical Review 4 (4):423.
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  27.  15
    The Literary Mind.Mark Turner - 1996 - Oxford University Press.
    We usually consider literary thinking to be peripheral and dispensable, an activity for specialists: poets, prophets, lunatics, and babysitters. Certainly we do not think it is the basis of the mind. We think of stories and parables from Aesop's Fables or The Thousand and One Nights, for example, as exotic tales set in strange lands, with spectacular images, talking animals, and fantastic plots--wonderful entertainments, often insightful, but well removed from logic and science, and entirely foreign to the world of everyday (...)
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  28.  19
    A Flawed Argument Reconstruction in Political Philosophy: R. Child on A. Sangiovanni.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    There are some premise-by-premise reconstructions in political philosophy which are flawed, because they omit at least one premise or misword at least one premise. This paper focuses on a reconstruction by Richard Child. The original argument is by Andrea Sangiovanni and is about whether egalitarian values of distributive justice apply both within a state and globally. Child’s reconstruction has been reproduced in a paper by Ian Davis, who approves of it. But I point out five logical problems with (...)
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  29.  14
    Trade-Offs Between Female Food Acquisition and Child Care Among Hiwi and Ache Foragers.A. Magdalena Hurtado, Kim Hill, Ines Hurtado & Hillard Kaplan - 1992 - Human Nature 3 (3):185-216.
    Even though female food acquisition is an area of considerable interest in hunter-gatherer research, the ecological determinants of women’s economic decisions in these populations are still poorly understood. The literature on female foraging behavior indicates that there is considerable variation within and across foraging societies in the amount of time that women spend foraging and in the amount and types of food that they acquire. It is possible that this heterogeneity reflects variation in the trade-offs between time spent in food (...)
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  30. Child Soldiers, Executive Functions, and Culpability.Tyler Fagan, William Hirstein & Katrina Sifferd - 2016 - International Criminal Law Review 16 (2):258-286.
    Child soldiers, who often appear to be both victims and perpetrators, present a vexing moral and legal challenge: how can we protect the rights of children while seeking justice for the victims of war crimes? There has been little stomach, either in domestic or international courts, for prosecuting child soldiers—but neither has this challenge been systematically addressed in international law. Establishing a uniform minimum age of criminal responsibility would be a major step in the right direction; we argue (...)
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  31.  8
    Kin and Child Survival in Rural Malawi.Rebecca Sear - 2008 - Human Nature 19 (3):277-293.
    This paper investigates the impact of kin on child survival in a matrilineal society in Malawi. Women usually live in close proximity to their matrilineal kin in this agricultural community, allowing opportunities for helping behavior between matrilineal relatives. However, there is little evidence that matrilineal kin are beneficial to children. On the contrary, child mortality rates appear to be higher in the presence of maternal grandmothers and maternal aunts. These effects are modified by the sex of child (...)
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  32.  29
    Doing the Best for One's Child: Satisficing Versus Optimizing Parentalism. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Blustein - 2012 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (3):199-205.
    The maxim “parents should do what is in the best interests of their child” seems like an unassailable truth, and yet, as I argue here, there are serious problems with it when it is taken seriously. One problem concerns the sort of demands such a principle places on parents; the other concerns its larger social implications when conceived as part of a national policy for the rearing of children. The theory of parenting that creates these problems I call “optimizing (...)
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  33.  6
    [Book Review] the Worth of a Child[REVIEW]Thomas H. Murray - 1999 - Hastings Center Report 29 (3):44.
    Thomas Murray's graceful and humane book illuminates one of the most morally complex areas of everyday life: the relationship between parents and children. What do children mean to their parents, and how far do parental obligations go? What, from the beginning of life to its end, is the worth of a child? Ethicist Murray leaves the rarefied air of abstract moral philosophy in order to reflect on the moral perplexities of ordinary life and ordinary people. Observing that abstract moral (...)
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  34.  48
    Reasons-Responsiveness and Ownership-of-Agency: Fischer and Ravizza's Historicist Theory of Responsibility. [REVIEW]David Zimmerman - 2002 - Journal of Ethics 6 (3):199-234.
    No one has done more than John Martin Fischer and Mark Ravizza to advance our understanding of the important dispute in the theory of responsibility between structuralists and historicists. This makes it all the more important to take the measure of Responsibility and Control, their most recent contribution to the historicist side of the discussion. In this paper I examine some novel features of their most recent version of responsiblity-historicism, especially their new notions of "moderate reasons-responsiveness" and "ownership-of-agency." Fischer (...)
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  35.  78
    Why the Family?Luara Ferracioli - 2015 - Law, Ethics and Philosophy 3:205-219.
    Among the most pressing philosophical questions occupying those interested in the ethics of the family is why should parents, as opposed to charity workers or state officials, raise children. In their recent Family Values, Brighouse and Swift have further articulated and strengthen their own justification of the parent-child relationship by appealing to its crucial role in enabling the child’s proper development and in allowing parents to play a valuable fiduciary role in the lives of children. In this paper, (...)
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  36.  5
    Social Awareness and Early Self-Recognition.Philippe Rochat, Tanya Broesch & Katherine Jayne - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1491-1497.
    Self-recognition by 86 children was assessed using the mirror mark test in two different social contexts. In the classic mirror task condition, only the child was marked prior to mirror exposure . In the social norm condition, the child, experimenter, and accompanying parent were marked prior to the child’s mirror exposure . Results indicate that in both conditions children pass the test in comparable proportion, with the same increase as a function of age. However, in the (...)
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  37.  7
    The Child as Natural Phenomenologist: Primal and Primary Experience in Merleau-Ponty's Psychology.Talia Welsh - 2013 - Northwestern University Press.
    Early work in child psychology -- Phenomenology, gestalt theory, and psychoanalysis -- Syncretic sociability and the birth of the self -- Contemporary research in psychology and phenomenology -- Exploration and learning -- Culture, development, and gender -- Conclusion: an incomparable childhood.
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  38.  5
    Evolutionary Pathway of Child Development.Tamas Bereczkei & Andras Csanaky - 1996 - Human Nature 7 (3):257-280.
    An evolutionary theory of socialization suggests that children from father-absent families will mature earlier, and form less-stable pair bonds, compared with those from father-present families. Using a sample of about 1,000 persons the recent study focuses on elements of father-absent children’s behavior that could be better explained by a Darwinian approach than by rival social science theories. As a result of their enhanced interest in male competition, father-absent boys were found to engage in rule-breaking behavior more intensively than father-present boys. (...)
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  39.  43
    Child Assent and Parental Permission in Pediatric Research.Wilma C. Rossi, William Reynolds & Robert M. Nelson - 2003 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (2):131-148.
    Since children are considered incapable ofgiving informed consent to participate inresearch, regulations require that bothparental permission and the assent of thepotential child subject be obtained. Assent andpermission are uniquely bound together, eachserving a different purpose. Parentalpermission protects the child from assumingunreasonable risks. Assent demonstrates respectfor the child and his developing autonomy. Inorder to give meaningful assent, the child mustunderstand that procedures will be performed,voluntarily choose to undergo the procedures,and communicate this choice. Understanding theelements of informed consent (...)
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  40.  51
    Review of Mark Sainsbury, Paradoxes. [REVIEW]Vincent C. Müller - 1994 - European Review of Philosophy 1:182-184.
  41.  75
    Intentionality, Consciousness, and the Mark of the Mental: Rorty’s Challenge.James Tartaglia - 2008 - The Monist 91 (2):324-346.
    Intentionality and phenomenal consciousness are the main candidates to provide a ‘ mark of the mental’. Rorty, who thinks the category ‘mental’ lacks any underlying unity, suggests a challenge to these positions: to explain how intentionality or phenomenal consciousness alone could generate a mental-physical contrast. I argue that a failure to meet Rorty’s challenge would present a serious indictment of the concept of mind, even though Rorty’s own position is untenable. I then argue that both intentionalism and proposals such (...)
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  42.  27
    “Frequent Frames” in German Child-Directed Speech: A Limited Cue to Grammatical Categories.Barbara Stumper, Colin Bannard, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (6):1190-1205.
    Mintz (2003) found that in English child-directed speech, frequently occurring frames formed by linking the preceding (A) and succeeding (B) word (A_x_B) could accurately predict the syntactic category of the intervening word (x). This has been successfully extended to French (Chemla, Mintz, Bernal, & Christophe, 2009). In this paper, we show that, as for Dutch (Erkelens, 2009), frequent frames in German do not enable such accurate lexical categorization. This can be explained by the characteristics of German including a less (...)
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  43.  69
    Where is My Mind? Mark Rowlands on the Vehicles of Cognition.Andreas Elpidorou - 2012 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 3 (1):145-160.
    Do our minds extend beyond our brains? In a series of publications, Mark Rowlands has argued that the correct answer to this question is an affirmative one. According to Rowlands, certain types of operations on bodily and worldly structures should be considered to be proper and literal parts of our cognitive and mental processes. In this article, I present and critically evaluate Rowlands' position.
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  44.  58
    The Well- and Unwell-Being of a Child.Christina Schües & Christoph Rehmann-Sutter - 2013 - Topoi 32 (2):197-205.
    The concept of the ‘well-being of the child’ (like the ‘child’s welfare’ and ‘best interests of the child’) has remained underdetermined in legal and ethical texts on the needs and rights of children. As a hypothetical construct that draws attention to the child’s long-term welfare, the well-being of the child is a broader concept than autonomy and happiness. This paper clarifies some conceptual issues of the well-being of the child from a philosophical point of (...)
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  45.  30
    The Dirty Word.Michael Berman & Natasha Berman - 2011 - Think 10 (27):77-81.
    For the first two years of my daughter's life, I was scheduled to teach an Introductory Logic course. While I had taught Critical Thinking courses in the past, having to steep myself in categorical and propositional logic left a lasting impression on my own thinking. More importantly, though, these courses influenced my speech-habits during the early years of my child's development. By no means do I intend to assert that my child somehow gained some cognitive benefit from my (...)
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  46.  25
    The Welfare of the Child.John Harris - 2000 - Health Care Analysis 8 (1):27-34.
    The interests or welfare of the child are rightly central to anydiscussion of the ethics of reproduction. The problematic nature of thislegitimate concern is seldom, if ever, noticed or if it is, it ismisunderstood. A prominent example of this sort of misunderstandingoccurs in the Department of Health's recent and important `SurrogacyReview' chaired by Margaret Brazier (The Brazier Report) and thesame misunderstanding makes nonsense of at least one provision of theHuman Fertilization and Embryology Act 1990. (The HFE Act).This paper explores (...)
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  47.  34
    Child-Rearing: On Government Intervention and the Discourse of Experts.Paul Smeyers - 2008 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (6):719-738.
    For Kant, education was understood as the 'means' to become human—and that is to say, rational. For Rousseau by contrast, and the many child-centred educators that followed him, the adult world, far from representing reason, is essentially corrupt and given over to the superficialities of worldly vanity. On this view, the child, as a product of nature, is essentially good and will learn all she needs to know from experience. Both positions have their own problems, but beyond this (...)
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  48.  22
    Wittgensteinian Pedagogics: Cavell on the Figure of the Child in the Investigations.Michael Peters - 2001 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (2):125-138.
    This paper discusses Stanley Cavell's approach to the Investigations,focusing upon his essay – `Notes and Afterthoughts on the Opening ofWittgenstein's Investigations'. First, the paper investigates the waysin which Cavell makes central the figure and `voice' of the child to hisreading of the opening of the Investigations. Second, it argues thatCavell's Notes provides a basis for a Wittgensteinian pedagogics,for not only does it hold up the figure of the child as central to the Investigations but it does so in (...)
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  49.  43
    Prospects for a Dual Inheritance Model of Emotional Evolution.Stefan Linquist - 2007 - Philosophy of Science 74 (5):848-859.
    A common objection to adaptationist accounts of human emotions is that they ignore the influence of culture. If complex emotions like guilt, shame and romantic jealousy are largely culturally determined, how could they be biological adaptations? Dual inheritance models of gene/culture coevolution provide a potential answer to this question. If complex emotions are developmentally ‘scaffolded' by norms that are transmitted from parent to offspring with reasonably high fidelity, then these emotions can evolve to promote individual reproductive interests. This paper draws (...)
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  50.  30
    Guilt and Child Soldiers.Krista K. Thomason - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (1):115-127.
    The use of child soldiers in armed conflict is an increasing global concern. Although philosophers have examined whether child soldiers can be considered combatants in war, much less attention has been paid to their moral responsibility. While it is tempting to think of them as having diminished or limited responsibility, child soldiers often report feeling guilt for the wrongs they commit. Here I argue that their feelings of guilt are both intelligible and morally appropriate. The feelings of (...)
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