Results for 'Mark Dance'

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  1.  25
    Writing for the Body Notation, Reconstruction, and Reinvention in Dance.Mark Franko - 2011 - Common Knowledge 17 (2):321-334.
    This article explores the history of dance notation from the Renaissance to postmodern dance. It examines the tension between text and oral tradition in Western dance practices, as well as the issue of how to reconcile our views of choreography as both scriptural and visual. It has been difficult, if not impossible, to think of notation in relation to composition; notation has become almost solely associated with reconstruction as a phenomenon of historical interest. But, at the same (...)
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  2. How Marking in Dance Constitutes Thinking with the Body.David Kirsh - 2011 - The External Mind:183-214.
    In dance, there is a practice called ‘marking’. When dancers mark, they execute a dance phrase in a simplified, schematic or abstracted form. Based on our interviews with professional dancers in the classical, modern, and contemporary traditions, it is fair to assume that most dancers mark in the normal course of rehearsal and practice. When marking, dancers use their body-in-motion to represent some aspect of the full-out phrase they are thinking about. Their stated reason for marking (...)
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  3.  34
    Slaves of the Passions.Mark Schroeder - 2009 - Analysis 69 (3):574-576.
    Like much in this book, the title and dust jacket illustration are clever. The first evokes Hume's remark in the Treatise that ‘Reason is, and ought only to be the slave of the passions.’ The second, which represents a cross between a dance-step and a clinch, links up with the title and anticipates an example used throughout the book to support its central claims: that Ronnie, unlike Bradley, has a reason to go to a party – namely, that there (...)
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  4.  55
    The Artful Mind: Cognitive Science and the Riddle of Human Creativity.Mark Turner (ed.) - 2006 - Oup Usa.
    All normal human beings alive in the last fifty thousand years appear to have possessed, in Mark Turner's phrase, 'impressively atful minds'. Cognitively modern minds produced a staggering list of behavioural singularities - science, religion, mathematics, language, advanced tool use, decorative dress, dance, culture, art - that seems to indicate a mysterious and unexplained discontinuity between us and all other living things. This brute fact gives rise to some tantalizing questions: How did the artful mind emerge? What are (...)
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  5.  49
    Review Essay: Politics and Moving Bodies: Social Choreography: Ideology and Performance in Dance and Everyday Movement, by Andrew Hewitt. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2005. 254 Pp. $22.95 . Bodies in Code: Interfaces with Digital Media, by Mark B. N. Hansen. New York: Routledge, 2006. 327 Pp. $24.95 . Politics of Touch: Sense, Movement, Sovereignty, by Erin Manning. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2007. 195 Pp. $22.50. [REVIEW]Derek P. McCormack - 2007 - Political Theory 35 (6):816-824.
  6.  30
    Technoperformances: Using Metaphors From the Performance Arts for a Postphenomenology and Posthermeneutics of Technology Use.Mark Coeckelbergh - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (3):557-568.
    Postphenomenology and posthermeneutics as initiated by Ihde have made important contributions to conceptualizing understanding human–technology relations. However, their focus on individual perception, artifacts, and static embodiment has its limitations when it comes to understanding the embodied use of technology as involving bodily movement, social, and taking place within, and configuring, a temporal horizon. To account for these dimensions of experience, action, and existence with technology, this paper proposes to use a conceptual framework based on performance metaphors. Drawing on metaphors from (...)
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  7.  19
    Movement for Movement's Sake? On the Relationship Between Kinaesthesia and Aesthetics.Mark Paterson - 2012 - Essays in Philosophy 13 (2):7.
    Movement and, more particularly, kinesthesia as a modality and as a metaphor has become of interest at the intersection of phenomenology and cognitive science. In this paper I wish to combine three historically related strands, aisthêsis, kinesthesis and aesthetics, to advance an argument concerning the aesthetic value of certain somatic sensations. Firstly, by capitalizing on a recent regard for somatic or inner bodily senses, including kinesthesia, proprioception and the vestibular system by drawing lines of historical continuity from earlier philosophical investigations (...)
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  8.  14
    The Origin of Selkies.Mark Turner - 2004 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (5-6):5-6.
    Cognitively modern human beings have language, art, science, religion, refined tool use, advanced music and dance, fashions of dress, and mathematics. Blue jays, border collies, dolphins, and bonobos do not. Only human beings have what we have, and this discontinuity in Life, this perspicuous Grand Difference, presents us with the most abiding and compelling scientific riddle of all. In The Way We Think, Gilles FauconnieRAnd I put forward the hypothesis that The Grand Difference arose in the following way . (...)
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  9.  18
    Archaeological Choreographic Practices: Foucault and Forsythe.Mark Franko - 2011 - History of the Human Sciences 24 (4):97-112.
    Although Michel Foucault never wrote of dance as an example of a bodily discipline in the classical age, he did affect the art of contemporary ballet through his influence on the work of William Forsythe. This article interprets Foucault’s influence on Forsythe up until the early 1990s and also examines how Forsythe’s choreography ‘responded’ to issues of agency, inscription and discipline that characterize Foucault’s thought on corporeality. Ultimately, it asks whether Forsythe’s use of Foucauldian theory leads to a reinterpretation (...)
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  10. Slaves of the Passions * by Mark Schroeder. [REVIEW]M. Alvarez - 2009 - Analysis 69 (3):574-576.
    Like much in this book, the title and dust jacket illustration are clever. The first evokes Hume's remark in the Treatise that ‘Reason is, and ought only to be the slave of the passions.’ The second, which represents a cross between a dance-step and a clinch, links up with the title and anticipates an example used throughout the book to support its central claims: that Ronnie, unlike Bradley, has a reason to go to a party – namely, that there (...)
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  11. Thinking with the Body.David Kirsh - 2010 - Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (T):176-194.
    To explore the question of physical thinking – using the body as an instrument of cognition – we collected extensive video and interview data on the creative process of a noted choreographer and his company as they made a new dance. A striking case of physical thinking is found in the phenomenon of marking. Marking refers to dancing a phrase in a less than complete manner. Dancers mark to save energy. But they also mark to explore the (...)
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  12. Mad Speculation and Absolute Inhumanism: Lovecraft, Ligotti, and the Weirding of Philosophy.Ben Woodard - 2011 - Continent 1 (1):3-13.
    continent. 1.1 : 3-13. / 0/ – Introduction I want to propose, as a trajectory into the philosophically weird, an absurd theoretical claim and pursue it, or perhaps more accurately, construct it as I point to it, collecting the ground work behind me like the Perpetual Train from China Mieville's Iron Council which puts down track as it moves reclaiming it along the way. The strange trajectory is the following: Kant's critical philosophy and much of continental philosophy which has followed, (...)
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  13.  14
    Mobile Affects, Open Secrets, and Global Illiquidity: Pockets, Pools, and Plasma.G. J. Seigworth & M. Tiessen - 2012 - Theory, Culture and Society 29 (6):47-77.
    This article will take up Deleuze and Guattari’s allusive yet insightful writings on ‘the secret’ by considering the secret across three intermingling registers or modulations: as content , as form , and as expression . Setting the secret in relation to evolving modes of technological mediation and sociality as respectively pocket, pooling, and plasma, the article works through a trio of examples in order to understand the contemporary movements of secrets: the memories of secrets evoked in an intimately interactive music (...)
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  14.  37
    Duchamp's Mischief.Joel Rudinow - 1981 - Critical Inquiry 7 (4):747-760.
    We began by…implying a comparison between Duchamp and the swindlers; we lately find ourselves . . . implying a comparison between Duchamp and the child. I believe that in the end both comparisons are essential to a thorough understanding of Duchamp's significance; it is also, however, essential that each comparison temper and qualify the other. The swindlers begin and end as aliens to the community on which they practice their art. Duchamp is as much inside the artworld as is the (...)
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  15. Extended Cognition and the Mark of the Cognitive.Mark Rowlands - 2009 - Philosophical Psychology 22 (1):1 – 19.
    According to the thesis of the extended mind (EM) , at least some token cognitive processes extend into the cognizing subject's environment in the sense that they are (partly) composed of manipulative, exploitative, and transformative operations performed by that subject on suitable environmental structures. EM has attracted four ostensibly distinct types of objection. This paper has two goals. First, it argues that these objections all reduce to one basic sort: all the objections can be resolved by the provision of an (...)
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  16.  11
    Crossover Queries: Dwelling with Negatives, Embodying Philosophy's Others.Edith Wyschogrod - 2006 - Fordham University Press.
    Exploring the risks, ambiguities, and unstable conceptual worlds of contemporary thought, Crossover Queries brings together the wide-ranging writings, across twenty years, of one of our most important philosophers.Ranging from twentieth-century European philosophy—the thought of Heidegger, Foucault, Derrida, Levinas, Janicaud, and others—to novels and artworks, music and dance, from traditional Jewish thought to Jain andBuddhist metaphysics, Wyschogrod’s work opens radically new vistas while remaining mindful that the philosopher stands within and is responsible to a philosophical legacy conditioned by the negative.Rather (...)
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  17.  30
    How to Become Unconscious: Stephen R. L. Clark.Stephen R. L. Clark - 2010 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 67:21-44.
    Consistent materialists are almost bound to suggest that ‘conscious experience’, if it exists at all, is no more than epiphenomenal. A correct understanding of the real requires that everything we do and say is no more than a product of whatever processes are best described by physics, without any privileged place, person, time or scale of action. Consciousness is a myth, or at least a figment. Plotinus was no materialist: for him, it is Soul and Intellect that are more real (...)
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  18.  19
    Nietzsche’s Dangerous Game: Philosophy in the Twilight of the Idols.Christopher Field - 1999 - Review of Metaphysics 52 (3):668-670.
    As the Nietzsche industry continues to thrive, offering Zarathustra zealots everything from coffee table photography books to quasi-fictional accounts of Nietzsche’s mad dance into insanity and posterity, Daniel Conway offers a sober account of Nietzsche’s late writings, choosing to address quite seriously the shrill excesses that mark Nietzsche’s work from 1885–8. Conway undertakes to present Nietzsche’s own decadence and inheriting readership as evidence of the failure of his later project. Nietzsche embarks on voyages toward terrible seas, seeking to (...)
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  19.  23
    Painter Into Painting: On Courbet's "After Dinner at Ornans" and "Stonebreakers".Michael Fried - 1982 - Critical Inquiry 8 (4):619-649.
    In the pages that follow I looked closely at two major paintings by Gustave Courbet : the After Dinner at Ornans, perhaps begun in the small town of the title but certainly completed in Paris during the winter of 1848-49; and the Stonebreakers, painted wholly in Ornans just under a year later. The After Dinner and the Stonebreakers are the first in a series of large multifigure compositions--others are the Burial at Ornans and the Peasants of Flagey Returning from the (...)
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  20.  36
    Myślenie Za Pomocą Ciała.David Kirsh - 2012 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 3 (T).
    To explore the question of physical thinking – using the body as an instrument of cognition – we collected extensive video and interview data on the creative process of a noted choreographer and his company as they made a new dance. A striking case of physical thinking is found in the phenomenon of marking. Marking refers to dancing a phrase in a less than complete manner. Dancers mark to save energy. But they also mark to explore the (...)
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  21. Thinking with the Body.David Kirsh - 2012 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 3 (T):176-194.
    To explore the question of physical thinking – using the body as an instrument of cognition – we collected extensive video and interview data on the creative process of a noted choreographer and his company as they made a new dance. A striking case of physical thinking is found in the phenomenon of marking. Marking refers to dancing a phrase in a less than complete manner. Dancers mark to save energy. But they also mark to explore the (...)
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  22. Objects as Temporary Autonomous Zones.Tim Morton - 2011 - Continent 1 (3):149-155.
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 149-155. The world is teeming. Anything can happen. John Cage, “Silence” 1 Autonomy means that although something is part of something else, or related to it in some way, it has its own “law” or “tendency” (Greek, nomos ). In their book on life sciences, Medawar and Medawar state, “Organs and tissues…are composed of cells which…have a high measure of autonomy.”2 Autonomy also has ethical and political valences. De Grazia writes, “In Kant's enormously influential moral philosophy, autonomy (...)
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  23. Mathematics: Truth and Fiction? Review of Mark Balaguer's Platonism and Anti-Platonism in Mathematics.Mark Colyvan & Edward N. Zalta - 1999 - Philosophia Mathematica 7 (3):336-349.
    Mark Balaguer’s project in this book is extremely ambitious; he sets out to defend both platonism and fictionalism about mathematical entities. Moreover, Balaguer argues that at the end of the day, platonism and fictionalism are on an equal footing. Not content to leave the matter there, however, he advances the anti-metaphysical conclusion that there is no fact of the matter about the existence of mathematical objects.1 Despite the ambitious nature of this project, for the most part Balaguer does not (...)
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  24. Ontological Independence as the Mark of the Real. Jody Azzouni. Deflating Existential Consequence: A Case for Nominalism. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004. Pp. Viii + 241. ISBN 0-19-515988-8. [REVIEW]Mark Colyvan - 2005 - Philosophia Mathematica 13 (2):216-225.
  25.  32
    Currents in Contemporary Ethics: Improve Privacy in Research by Eliminating Informed Consent? IOM Report Misses the Mark.Mark A. Rothstein - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (3):507-512.
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  26. Dance Therapy and Depth Psychology: The Moving Imagination.Joan Chodorow - 2015 - Routledge.
    Dance/movement as active imagination was originated by Jung in 1916. Developed in the 1960s by dance therapy pioneer Mary Whitehouse, it is today both an approach to dance therapy as well as a form of active imagination in analysis. In her delightful book Joan Chodorow provides an introduction to the origins, theory and practice of dance/movement as active imagination. Beginning with her own story the author shows how dance/ movement is of value to psychotherapy. An (...)
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  27. (Book Review) Ontological Independence as the Mark of the Real. [REVIEW]Mark Colyvan - 2005 - Philosophia Mathematica 13 (2):216-225.
  28.  95
    Mind, Dance, and Pedagogy.Jay A. Seitz - 2002 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 36 (4):37-42.
    Explores the role of dance education both inside and outside the arts.
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  29. Philosophical Essays on Dance with Responses From Choreographers, Critics and Dancers.Gordon Fancher, Gerald Myers & Connecticut College American Dance Festival - 1981
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  30. Schellenberg on Divine Hiddenness and Religious Scepticism: MARK L. McCREARY.Mark L. Mccreary - 2010 - Religious Studies 46 (2):207-225.
    J. L. Schellenberg has constructed major arguments for atheism based on divine hiddenness in two separate works. This paper reviews these arguments and highlights how they are grounded in reflections on perfect divine love. However, Schellenberg also defends what he calls the ‘subject mode’ of religious scepticism. I argue that if one accepts Schellenberg's scepticism, then the foundation of his divine-hiddenness arguments is undermined by calling into question some of his conclusions regarding perfect divine love. In other words, if his (...)
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  31.  14
    Understanding Dance.Graham Mcfee - 1993 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 51 (4):644-646.
  32. Dance of the Dialectic: Steps in Marx's Method.Bertell Ollman - 2003 - University of Illinois Press.
     
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  33.  27
    Recontextualizing Dance Skills: Overcoming Impediments to Motor Learning and Expressivity in Ballet Dancers.Janet Karin - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    The process of transmitting ballet’s complex technique to young dancers can interfere with the innate processes that give rise to efficient, expressive and harmonious movement. With the intention of identifying possible solutions, this article draws on research across the fields of neurology, psychology, motor learning, and education, and considers their relevance to ballet as an art form, a technique, and a training methodology. The integration of dancers’ technique and expressivity is a core theme throughout the paper. A brief outline of (...)
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  34. The Dance: Essence of Embodiment.Betty Block & Judith Lee Kissell - 2001 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (1):5-15.
    An analysis of movement, and particularly of dance,helps us to see in an extraordinarily effective way the meaningof embodiment. This paper then looks through the eyes ofdance theorists and at philosophers who consider dance andmovement and their meaning of embodiment. A study of movementand dance encompasses the fullest meaning of embodiment: that theembodied way of being-in-the-world is also an embedded way ofbeing in a world of others. Dance has critically importantsocial ramifications. In our own and other (...)
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  35.  6
    A Dance Movement Therapy Group for Depressed Adult Patients in a Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic: Effects of the Treatment.Päivi M. Pylvänäinen, Joona S. Muotka & Raimo Lappalainen - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  36.  48
    Towards a Broadening of the Concept of Religious Experience: Some Phenomenological Considerations: Mark Wynn.Mark Wynn - 2009 - Religious Studies 45 (2):147-166.
    The recent philosophical literature on religious experience has mostly been concerned with experiences which are taken by the subject of the experience to be directly of God or some other supernatural entity, or to involve some suspension of the subject–object structure of conventional experience. In this paper I consider a further kind of experience, where the sense of God is mediated by way of an appreciation of the existential meanings which are presented by a material context. In this way the (...)
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  37. A Dance Between the Reduction and Reflexivity: Explicating the "Phenomenological Psychological Attitude".Linda Finlay - 2008 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 39 (1):1-32.
    This article explores the nature of "the phenomenological attitude," which is understood as the process of retaining a wonder and openness to the world while reflexively restraining pre-understandings, as it applies to psychological research. A brief history identifies key philosphical ideas outlining Husserl's formulation of the reductions and subsequent existential-hermeneutic elaborations, and how these have been applied in empirical psychological research. Then three concrete descriptions of engaging the phenomenological attitude are offered, highlighting the way the epoché of the natural sciences, (...)
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  38. Thinking-is-Moving: Dance, Agency, and a Radically Enactive Mind. [REVIEW]Michele Merritt - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (1):95-110.
    Recently, in cognitive science, the enactivist account of cognition has been gaining ground, due in part to studies of movement in conjunction with thought. The idea, as Noë , has put it, that “cognition is not something happening inside us or to us, but it’s something we do, something we achieve,” is increasingly supported by research on joint attention, movement coordination, and gesture. Not surprisingly, therefore, enactivists have also begun to look at “movement specialists”—dancers—for both scientific and phenomenological accounts of (...)
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  39.  10
    An Interview with Mark Kleiman.Mark Allen Kleiman - 1999 - Jona's Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 1 (2):17-22.
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  40. The Phenomenology of Dance.Maxine Sheets-Johnstone - 1966 - Books for Libraries.
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  41.  91
    Who is the Invader? Alien Species, Property Rights, and the Police Power: Mark Sagoff.Mark Sagoff - 2009 - Social Philosophy and Policy 26 (2):26-52.
    This paper argues that the occurrence of a non-native species, such as purple loosestrife, on one's property does not constitute a nuisance in the context of background principles of common law. No one is injured by it. The control of non-native species, such as purple loosestrife, does not constitute a compelling public interest, moreover, but represents primarily the concern of an epistemic community of conservation biologists and ecologists. This paper describes a history of cases in agricultural law that establish that (...)
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  42.  75
    Comment On D. Wade Hands, “Karl Popper and Economic Methodology: A New Look”: Mark Blaug.Mark Blaug - 1985 - Economics and Philosophy 1 (2):286-288.
    The central argument of this interesting paper is that Popper appears to be inconsistent: on the one hand, he preaches methodological monism-scientific method in the social sciences is identical to scientific method in the natural sciences-and on the other hand he advocates “situational analysis” as the unique method of the social sciences. Situational analysis is nothing but our old neoclassical friend, the rationality principle-individual maximizing behavior subject to constraints-and thus, Popper seems to be saying, neoclassical economics is the only valid (...)
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  43.  8
    Dance, Music, Meter and Groove: A Forgotten Partnership.W. Tecumseh Fitch - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  44.  36
    Music and Dance as a Coalition Signaling System.Edward H. Hagen & Gregory A. Bryant - 2003 - Human Nature 14 (1):21-51.
    Evidence suggests that humans might have neurological specializations for music processing, but a compelling adaptationist account of music and dance is lacking. The sexual selection hypothesis cannot easily account for the widespread performance of music and dance in groups (especially synchronized performances), and the social bonding hypothesis has severe theoretical difficulties. Humans are unique among the primates in their ability to form cooperative alliances between groups in the absence of consanguineal ties. We propose that this unique form of (...)
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  45. From Movement to Dance.Maxine Sheets-Johnstone - 2012 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (1):39-57.
    This article begins with a summary phenomenological analysis of movement in conjunction with the question of “quality” in movement. It then specifies the particular kind of memory involved in a dancer’s memorization of a dance. On the basis of the phenomenological analysis and specification of memory, it proceeds to a clarification of meaning in dance. Taking its clue from the preceding sections, the concluding section of the article sets forth reasons why present-day cognitive science is unable to provide (...)
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  46. The Experience of Watching Dance: Phenomenological–Neuroscience Duets. [REVIEW]Corinne Jola, Shantel Ehrenberg & Dee Reynolds - 2012 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (1):17-37.
    This paper discusses possible correspondences between neuroscientific findings and phenomenologically informed methodologies in the investigation of kinesthetic empathy in watching dance. Interest in phenomenology has recently increased in cognitive science (Gallagher and Zahavi 2008 ) and dance scholars have recently contributed important new insights into the use of phenomenology in dance studies (e.g. Legrand and Ravn (Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8(3):389–408, 2009 ); Parviainen (Dance Research Journal 34(1):11–26, 2002 ); Rothfield (Topoi 24:43–53, 2005 )). In (...)
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  47.  18
    Dance of the Artificial Alignment and Ethics.Karamjit S. Gill - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (1):1-4.
  48. Improvisational Artistry in Live Dance Performance as Embodied and Extended Agency.Aili Bresnahan - 2014 - Dance Research Journal 46 (1):84-94.
    This paper provides an account of improvisational artistry in live dance performance that construes the contribution of the dance performer as a kind of agency. Andy Clark’s theory of the embodied and extended mind is used in order to consider how this account is supported by research on how a thinking-while-doing person navigates the world. I claim here that while a dance performer’s improvisational artistry does include embodied and extended features that occur outside of the brain and (...)
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  49.  26
    The Dance of Person and Place: One Interpretation of American Indian Philosophy.Thomas M. Norton-Smith - 2010 - State University of New York Press.
    Common themes in American Indian philosophy -- First introductions -- Common themes : a first look -- Constructing an actual American Indian world -- NelsonGoodman's constructivism -- Setting the stage -- Fact, fiction, and feeders -- Ontological pluralism -- True versions and well-made worlds -- Nonlinguistic versions and the advancement of understanding -- True versions and cultural bias -- Constructive realism : variations on a theme by Goodman -- True versions and cultural bias -- An American Indian well-made actual world (...)
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  50.  40
    The Aesthetics of Electronic Dance Music, Part I: History, Genre, Scenes, Identity, Blackness.Nick Wiltsher - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (8):415-425.
    Electronic dance music has much about it to interest philosophers. In this article, I explore facets of dance music cultures, using the issue of authenticity as a framing question. The problem of sorting real or authentic dance music from mainstream or commercial clubbing can be treated as a matter of history and genre-definition; as a matter of defining scenes or subcultures; and as a matter of blackness. In each case, electronic dance music, and critical discourse surrounding (...)
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