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Mark J. Cherry [77]Mark Joseph Cherry [1]
  1.  90
    Kidney for Sale by Owner.Mark J. Cherry - 2017 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (2):171-187.
    This paper defends an in principle understanding of the authority of persons over themselves and, in consequence, argues for significant limits on morally permissible state authority. It also defends an account of the limits of permissible state action that distinguishes between the ability of persons to convey authority to common projects and what may be judged virtuous, good, safe, or proper to do. In terms of organ transplantation policy, it concludes that it is morally acceptable, and should be legally permissible, (...)
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  2.  61
    Informed consent in texas: Theory and practice.Mark J. Cherry & H. Tristram Engelhardt - 2004 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (2):237 – 252.
    The legal basis of informed consent in Texas may on first examination suggest an unqualified affirmation of persons as the source of authority over themselves. This view of individuals in the practice of informed consent tends to present persons outside of any social context in general and outside of their families in particular. The actual functioning of law and medical practice in Texas, however, is far more complex. This study begins with a brief overview of the roots of Texas law (...)
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  3.  16
    Kidney for Sale by Owner.Mark J. Cherry - 2017 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (2):171-187.
    This paper defends an in principle understanding of the authority of persons over themselves and, in consequence, argues for significant limits on morally permissible state authority. It also defends an account of the limits of permissible state action that distinguishes between the ability of persons to convey authority to common projects and what may be judged virtuous, good, safe, or proper to do. In terms of organ transplantation policy, it concludes that it is morally acceptable, and should be legally permissible, (...)
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  4.  25
    Organ Vouchers and Barter Markets: Saving Lives, Reducing Suffering, and Trading in Human Organs.Mark J. Cherry - 2017 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 42 (5):503-517.
    The essays in this issue of The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy explore an innovative voucher program for encouraging kidney donation. Discussions cluster around a number of central moral and political/theoretical themes: What are the direct and indirect health care costs and benefits of such a voucher system in human organs? Do vouchers lead to more effective and efficient organ procurement and allocation or contribute to greater inequalities and inefficiencies in the transplantation system? Do vouchers contribute to the inappropriate commodification (...)
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  5.  65
    Sex, Abortion, and Infanticide: The Gulf between the Secular and the Divine.Mark J. Cherry - 2011 - Christian Bioethics 17 (1):25-46.
    This paper critically explores key aspects of the gulf between traditional Christian bioethics and the secular moral reflections that dominate contemporary bioethics. For example, in contrast to traditional Christian morality, the established secular bioethics judges extramarital sex acts among consenting persons, whether of the same or different sexes, as at least morally permissible, affirms sexual freedom for children to develop their own sexual identity, and holds the easy availability of abortion and infanticide as central to the liberty interests of women. (...)
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  6.  23
    Contested Organ Harvesting from the Newly Deceased: First Person Assent, Presumed Consent, and Familial Authority.Mark J. Cherry - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (5):603-620.
    Organ procurement policy from the recently deceased recasts families into gatekeepers of a scarce medical resource. To the frustration of organ procurement teams, families do not always authorize organ donation. As a result, efforts to increase the number of organs available for transplantation often seek to limit the authority of families to refuse organ retrieval. For example, in some locales if a deceased family member has satisfied the legal conditions for first-person prior assent, a much looser and easier standard to (...)
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  7.  45
    Re-Thinking the Role of the Family in Medical Decision-Making.Mark J. Cherry - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (4):451-472.
    This paper challenges the foundational claim that the human family is no more than a social construction. It advances the position that the family is a central category of experience, being, and knowledge. Throughout, the analysis argues for the centrality of the family for human flourishing and, consequently, for the importance of sustaining family-oriented practices within social policy, such as more family-oriented approaches to consent to medical treatment. Where individually oriented approaches to medical decision-making accent an ethos of isolated personal (...)
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  8.  45
    Adolescents Lack Sufficient Maturity to Consent to Medical Research.Mark J. Cherry - 2017 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 45 (3):307-317.
    This study explores the ways in which adolescents, even so-called “mature minors”, lack adequate development of the intellectual, affective, and emotional capacities necessary morally to consent to medical research on their own behalf. The psychological and neurophysiological data regarding brain maturation supports the conclusion that adolescents are qualitatively different types of agents than mature adults. They lack full adult maturity and personal agency. As a result, in addition to the usual requirements for IRB approval, one or both parents, or a (...)
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  9.  18
    Clinical and Organizational Ethics: Challenges to Methodology and Practice.Mark J. Cherry - 2020 - HEC Forum 32 (3):191-197.
    The day-to-day work of clinical ethics consultants and healthcare ethics committees can easily become overly routine. Too much routine, however, comes with a risk that morally important practices will be reduced to mere bureaucratic formalities, while practitioners become desensitized to ethically significant distinctions between cases. Clinical ethics consultation and organizational ethics must be set within the broader social and cultural context of the healthcare environment. This practice requires looking beyond mere legal compliance and the routinely false assumption that there are (...)
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  10.  46
    Conscience Clauses, the Refusal to Treat, and Civil Disobedience—Practicing Medicine as a Christian in a Hostile Secular Moral Space.Mark J. Cherry - 2012 - Christian Bioethics 18 (1):1-14.
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  11.  15
    What Happens if the Brain Goes Elsewhere? Reflections on Head Transplantation and Personal Embodiment.Mark J. Cherry - 2022 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 47 (2):240-256.
    Brain transplants have long been no more than the subject of science fiction and engaging thought experiments. That is no longer true. Neuroscientists have announced their intention to transplant the head of a volunteer onto a donated body. Response has been decidedly mixed. How should we think about the moral permissibility of head transplants? Is it a life-saving/life-enhancing opportunity that appropriately expands the boundaries of medical practice? Or, is it a bioethical morass that ought not to be attempted? For the (...)
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  12.  64
    Bioethics and Moral Agency: On Autonomy and Moral Responsibility.John Skalko & Mark J. Cherry - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (5):435-443.
    Two clusters of essays in this issue of The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy provide a critical gaze through which to explore central moral, phenomenological, ontological, and political concerns regarding human moral agency and personal responsibility. The first cluster challenges common assumptions in bioethics regarding the voluntariness of human actions. The second set turns the debate towards morally responsible choice within the requirements of distributive justice. The force of their collective analysis leaves us with a well-founded basis critically to approach (...)
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  13.  34
    Informed Consent: The Decisional Standing of Families.Mark J. Cherry & Ruiping Fan - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (4):363-370.
  14.  63
    Created in the Image of God: Bioethical Implications of the Imago Dei.Mark J. Cherry - 2017 - Christian Bioethics 23 (3):219-233.
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  15.  24
    Bioethics without God: The Transformation of Medicine within a Fully Secular Culture.Mark J. Cherry - 2019 - Christian Bioethics 25 (1):1-16.
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  16.  27
    Family-Based Consent to Organ Transplantation: A Cross-Cultural Exploration.Mark J. Cherry, Ruiping Fan & Kelly Kate Evans - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (5):521-533.
    This special thematic issue of The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy brings together a cross-cultural set of scholars from Asia, Europe, and North America critically to explore foundational questions of familial authority and the implications of such findings for organ procurement policies designed to increase access to transplantation. The substantial disparity between the available supply of human organs and demand for organ transplantation creates significant pressure to manipulate public policy to increase organ procurement. As the articles in this issue explore, (...)
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  17. Is a market in human organs necessarily exploitative?Mark J. Cherry - 2000 - Public Affairs Quarterly 14 (4):337--360.
    Creation of for-profit markets in organs for transplantation ignites in many deep moral repugnance. Proposals to broker organs have been denounced by the US Congress and professional groups alike. Financial incentives are believed to undermine consent, coercing the poor into selling their organs, violating human dignity, and improperly commodifying the human body; such concerns are held to trump the possibility of increasing life-sustaining transplants. While such views summarize the apparent global consensus which marks worldwide prohibition of the sale of human (...)
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  18. Physician-Assisted Suicide and Voluntary Euthanasia: How Not to Die as a Christian.Mark J. Cherry - 2018 - Christian Bioethics 24 (1):1-16.
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  19.  65
    Body Parts and the Market Place: Insights from Thomistic Philosophy.Mark J. Cherry - 2000 - Christian Bioethics 6 (2):171-193.
    With rare exception, Roman Catholic moral theologians condemn the sale of human organs for transplantation. Yet, such criticism, while rhetorically powerful, often over-simplifies complex issues. Arguments for the prohibition of a market in human organs may, therefore, depend on a single premise, or a cluster of dubious and allied premises, which when examined cannot hold. In what follows, I will examine the ways in which such arguments are configured. For example, Thomas Aquinas’(1224-1274) understandings of embodiment and moral uses of the (...)
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  20.  13
    Bioethicist as Partisan Ideologue.Mark J. Cherry - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (6):22-25.
    Power tends to corrupt and absolute power corrupts absolutely. To be clear, I do not think that blood transfusions necessarily...
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  21.  19
    Christian Bioethics and the Partisan Commitments of Secular Bioethicists: Epistemic Injustice, Moral Distress, Civil Disobedience.Mark J. Cherry - 2021 - Christian Bioethics 27 (2):123-139.
    Secular bioethicists do not speak from a place of distinction, but from within particular culturally, socially, and historically conditioned standpoints. As partisans of moral and ideological agendas, they bring their own biases, prejudices, and worldviews to their roles as ethical consultants, social advocates, and academics, attempting rhetorically to sway others and shift policy to a preferred point of view. Their pronouncements represent just one voice among others, even when delivered with strident rhetoric, in an educated and knowing tone, from within (...)
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  22.  62
    Pragmatism and bioethics: Diagnosis or cure?Christopher Tollefsen & Mark J. Cherry - 2003 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (5 & 6):533 – 544.
  23. Individually Directed Informed Consent and the Decline of the Family in the West.Mark J. Cherry - 2015 - In Ruiping Fan (ed.), Family-Oriented Informed Consent: East Asian and American Perspectives. Cham: Springer Verlag.
     
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  24. Non-Consensual Treatment Is (Nearly Always) Morally Impermissible.Mark J. Cherry - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (4):789-798.
    Commentators routinely urge that it is morally permissible forcibly to treat psychiatric patients (1) to preserve the patient's best interests and (2) to restore the patient's autonomy. Such arguments specify duties of beneficence toward others, while appreciating personal autonomy as a positive value to be weighted against other factors. Varying by jurisdiction, legal statutes usually require, in addition, at least (3) that there exists the threat of harm to self or others. In this paper, I argue against embracing the first (...)
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  25.  19
    Editors’ Statement on the Responsible Use of Generative AI Technologies in Scholarly Journal Publishing.Gregory E. Kaebnick, David Christopher Magnus, Audiey Kao, Mohammad Hosseini, David Resnik, Veljko Dubljević, Christy Rentmeester, Bert Gordijn & Mark J. Cherry - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics 24 (3):5-8.
    The new generative artificial intelligence (AI) tools, and especially the large language models (LLMs) of which ChatGPT is the most prominent example, have the potential to transform many aspects o...
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  26.  21
    Editors’ Statement on the Responsible Use of Generative AI Technologies in Scholarly Journal Publishing.Gregory E. Kaebnick, David Christopher Magnus, Audiey Kao, Mohammad Hosseini, David Resnik, Veljko Dubljević, Christy Rentmeester, Bert Gordijn & Mark J. Cherry - 2023 - Hastings Center Report 53 (5):3-6.
    Generative artificial intelligence (AI) has the potential to transform many aspects of scholarly publishing. Authors, peer reviewers, and editors might use AI in a variety of ways, and those uses might augment their existing work or might instead be intended to replace it. We are editors of bioethics and humanities journals who have been contemplating the implications of this ongoing transformation. We believe that generative AI may pose a threat to the goals that animate our work but could also be (...)
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  27.  86
    Why Physician-Assisted Suicide Perpetuates the Idolatry of Medicine.Mark J. Cherry - 2003 - Christian Bioethics 9 (2-3):245-271.
    Adequate response to physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia depends on fundamental philosophical and theological issues, including the character of an appropriate philosophically and theologically anchored anthropology, where the central element of traditional Christian anthropology is that humans are created to worship God. As I will argue, Christian morality and moral epistemology must be nested within and understood through this background Christian anthropology. As a result, I will argue that physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia can only be one-sidedly and inadequately appreciated through rational (...)
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  28.  14
    Editors’ statement on the responsible use of generative AI technologies in scholarly journal publishing.Gregory E. Kaebnick, David Christopher Magnus, Audiey Kao, Mohammad Hosseini, David Resnik, Veljko Dubljević, Christy Rentmeester, Bert Gordijn & Mark J. Cherry - 2023 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 26 (4):499-503.
    Generative artificial intelligence (AI) has the potential to transform many aspects of scholarly publishing. Authors, peer reviewers, and editors might use AI in a variety of ways, and those uses might augment their existing work or might instead be intended to replace it. We are editors of bioethics and humanities journals who have been contemplating the implications of this ongoing transformation. We believe that generative AI may pose a threat to the goals that animate our work but could also be (...)
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  29.  72
    The normativity of the natural: human goods, human virtues, and human flourishing.Mark J. Cherry (ed.) - 2009 - [Dordrecht]: Springer.
    Perhaps nature is simply a challenge to be addressed, overcome, and set aside.This volume is a critical exploration of natural law theory.
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  30.  51
    Foundations of the Culture Wars: Compassion, Love, and Human Dignity.Mark J. Cherry - 2001 - Christian Bioethics 7 (3):299-316.
    Mark J. Cherry; Foundations of the Culture Wars: Compassion, Love, and Human Dignity, Christian bioethics: Non-Ecumenical Studies in Medical Morality, Volume 7.
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  31.  24
    Non-Consensual Treatment is (Nearly Always) Morally Impermissible.Mark J. Cherry - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (4):789-798.
    The goal of my comments regarding the case study of Eve Hyde — presented in the introduction of this symposium — is not first and foremost to resolve the conflict between individual autonomy and medical paternalism regarding non-consensual psychiatric treatment. Instead, the goal is to step back far enough from what is generally accepted as the morally appropriate basis for non-consensual psychiatric treatment, including involuntary hospitalization and medication, and to ask very basic questions about when patients may permissibly be treated (...)
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  32.  14
    The Scandal of Secular Bioethics: What Happens When the Culture Acts as if there is No God?Mark J. Cherry - 2017 - Christian Bioethics 23 (2):85-99.
    This article explores the limits of secular philosophy and philosophical reason. It argues that once one abandons God, philosophical reason is unable to establish any particular bioethics or understanding of morality as canonical; that is, as definitively true and binding. Philosophy simply cannot secure the truth of any particular account of the right, the good, the just, or the virtuous. Once one abandons God, all is approached as if it were without ultimate meaning. Throughout, the article explores H. Tristram Engelhardt (...)
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  33.  12
    Correction: Editors’ statement on the responsible use of generative AI technologies in scholarly journal publishing.Gregory E. Kaebnick, David Christopher Magnus, Audiey Kao, Mohammad Hosseini, David Resnik, Veljko Dubljević, Christy Rentmeester, Bert Gordijn & Mark J. Cherry - 2023 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 26 (4):505-505.
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  34.  16
    Editors' statement on the responsible use of generative artificial intelligence technologies in scholarly journal publishing.Gregory E. Kaebnick, David Christopher Magnus, Audiey Kao, Mohammad Hosseini, David Resnik, Veljko Dubljević, Christy Rentmeester, Bert Gordijn & Mark J. Cherry - 2023 - Developing World Bioethics 23 (4):296-299.
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  35. The normativity of the natural : can philosophers pull morality out of the magic hat of human nature?Mark J. Cherry - 2009 - In The normativity of the natural: human goods, human virtues, and human flourishing. [Dordrecht]: Springer.
  36. The market and medical innovation: Human passions and medical advancement.Mark J. Cherry - 2005 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (6):555 – 569.
  37.  45
    Traditional Christian Norms and the Shaping of Public Moral Life: How Should Christians Engage in Bioethical Debate within the Public Forum?Mark J. Cherry - 2007 - Christian Bioethics 13 (2):129-138.
    The TRUTH is announced to creation by the Holy Spirit, the Spirit of Truth. Here, when the consciousness rises above “the double bound of space and time” and enters into eternity, here at this moment of annunciation, the One Who announces the Truth and the Truth Announced coincide completely. In the appearance of the Spirit of Truth, i.e., in the light of Tabor, the form and the content of the Truth are one (Florensky, 1997, p. 106).
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  38.  17
    Bioethics: Shaping Medical Practice and Taking Diversity Seriously.Mark J. Cherry - 2023 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 48 (4):313-321.
    Bioethics functions within a world of deep moral pluralism; a universe of discourse debating ethical analysis, public policy, and clinical practice in which a common, generally accepted morality does not exist. While religious thinkers are often approached within a hermeneutic of suspicion for assuming moral standards that cannot be justified in rational terms, secular bioethicists routinely find themselves in exactly the same intellectual predicament. That ethical theory, proposed values, or normative content is secular, that it does not invoke God or (...)
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  39.  34
    Medical innovation, collapsing goods, and the moral centrality of the free-market.Mark J. Cherry - 2006 - Journal of Value Inquiry 40 (2-3):209-226.
  40.  40
    Medicine, Morality, and Mortality: The Challenges of Moral Diversity.Mark J. Cherry - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (5):473-483.
    This issue of The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy assesses the deep and abiding tensions that exist among the competing epistemic perspectives that bear on medicine and morality. Concepts of health and disease, as well as the theoretical framing of medical ethics and health care policy, intersect with an overlapping set of culturally situated communities, striving to understand and manipulate the world in ways that each finds explanatory, appropriate, or otherwise befitting. The articles explore the complexities of framing public health (...)
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  41.  10
    Editors’ Statement on the Responsible Use of Generative AI Technologies in Scholarly Journal Publishing.Gregory E. Kaebnick, David Christopher Magnus, Audiey Kao, Mohammad Hosseini, David Resnik, Veljko Dubljević, Christy Rentmeester, Bert Gordijn & Mark J. Cherry - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 14 (4):337-340.
    The new generative artificial intelligence (AI) tools, and especially the large language models (LLMs) of which ChatGPT is the most prominent example, have the potential to transform many aspects o...
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  42.  9
    Well-Being, Health, and Human Embodiment: The Familial Lifeworld.Mark J. Cherry - 2023 - In Elodie Boublil & Susi Ferrarello (eds.), The Vulnerability of the Human World: Well-being, Health, Technology and the Environment. Springer Verlag. pp. 73-89.
    This chapter explores the experiential reality of the family and its role in securing human well-being. I argue that the family is an epistemic category as well as an ontological category: it reveals the being of the phenomenological life-world in ways that are necessary for adequately appreciating the embodiment of human health and well-being. Without the family, there are significant areas of human flourishing about which one can neither know nor experience. The family uncovers categories of moral duties and virtues (...)
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  43.  26
    Index to Volume 21.Howard Brody, Rita Charon, Tod Chambers, Mary Williams Clark, Dwight Davis, Richard Martinez, Robert M. Nelson & Mark J. Cherry - 1996 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 21:681-684.
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  44. Scientific excellence, professional virtue, and the profit motive: The market and health care reform.Mark J. Cherry - 2003 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (3):259 – 280.
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  45.  48
    Sex Robots: A Twenty-First Century Innovation in the Culture Wars.Mark J. Cherry & Ruiping Fan - 2021 - In Ruiping Fan & Mark J. Cherry (eds.), Sex Robots: Social Impact and the Future of Human Relations. Springer. pp. 3-21.
    This volume brings together a set of conceptual, moral, and cultural concerns carefully to assess a significant public policy issue: the development and proliferation of sex robots. Critics argue, for example, that sex robots present a clear risk to real persons as well as a degradation of society. They claim that the prevalence of sex robots will increase sexual violence, immorally objectify women, encourage pedophilia, reinforce negative body image stereotypes, increase forms of sexual dysfunction, and pass on sexually transmitted disease. (...)
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  46.  15
    Foundations of Christian Bioethics: Metaphysical, Conceptual, and Biblical.Mark J. Cherry - 2023 - Christian Bioethics 29 (1):1-10.
    How can we definitively determine which biomedical choices are morally correct and which engage in seriously wrongful acts? Depending on whom one asks, one is informed that choices such as abortion, euthanasia, and significant body modification involve real moral harm (either as forms of murder or as denying the goodness of the body that God has provided), or that disallowing such “medical care” violates the basic rights of persons (where abortion, active euthanasia, and body modification are appreciated as positive expressions (...)
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  47.  23
    Whole-Body/Head Transplantation: Personal Identity, Experimental Surgery, and Bioethics.Mark J. Cherry & Ruiping Fan - 2022 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 47 (2):179-188.
    This issue of The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy brings together an international group of scholars from Hong Kong, Mainland China, and North America, critically to explore whole-body/head transplantation. The proposed procedure raises significant philosophical, ethical, and social/political questions. For example, assuming transplant is successful, who survives the surgery? Does personal identity necessarily follow the head? The contributors to this special thematic issue explore the nature and ground of personal identity, what it would mean to preserve personal identity, given such (...)
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  48.  35
    Index to Volume 22.Lisa Sowle Cahill, Mark J. Cherry, Ellen Wright Clayton, Francis Dominic Degnin, Kenneth DeVille, Robin S. Downie, Fiona Randall, Steven D. Edwards, Ruiping Fan & Kateryna Fedoryka - 1997 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 22:643-646.
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  49.  5
    Annals of Bioethics: Regional Perspectives in Bioethics.Mark J. Cherry & John F. Peppin - 2003 - Taylor & Francis.
    Regional Perspectives in Bioethics" illustrates the ways in which the national and international political landscape encompasses persons from diverse and often fragmented moral communities with widely varying moral intuitions, premises, evaluations and commitments.
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  50.  10
    Annals of Bioethics: Regional Perspectives in Bioethics.Mark J. Cherry & John F. Peppin - 2003 - Taylor & Francis.
    Regional Perspectives in Bioethics" illustrates the ways in which the national and international political landscape encompasses persons from diverse and often fragmented moral communities with widely varying moral intuitions, premises, evaluations and commitments.
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