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Mark Larrimore [11]Mark Joseph Larrimore [2]
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  1. Religion and the Promise of Happiness.Mark Larrimore - 2010 - Social Research 77 (2):569-594.
    The concepts of "religion" and "happiness" are deceptively simple—domesticated products of the modern liberal order—but probing their connections can be illuminating. Seeing religions as means to a generic kind of happiness blinds us to the promise and danger of religious difference. Seeing religion as compensation for the absence or unjust distribution of happiness reinforces unexamined worldly conceptions of happiness. To learn to think about religion and happiness beyond modern consumerist pieties, examination of prosperity religion, the metaphysics of William James's "religion (...)
     
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  2.  14
    Through a Glass DarklyLeibniz and China: A Commerce of Light. [REVIEW]Mark Larrimore - 2005 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 26 (1):207-218.
    Comparative philosophy remains an outsider even in our time. The most common such work, comparing the philosophies of “East” and “West,” tends to reinscribe stereotypes we have learned to suspect as Orientalist. Critics of the enterprise have noted that the very concept of philosophy is culturally specific; the search for non-Western philosophies would be a subtle imperalism even if it did not so often turn up empty-handed. Instead of abandoning ourselves to Eurocentrism we might do better to regard comparative study (...)
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  3.  20
    Substitutes for Wisdom: Kant's Practical Thought and the Tradition of the Temperaments.Mark Joseph Larrimore - 2001 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (2):259-288.
  4.  31
    Sublime Waste: Kant on the Destiny of the ‘Races’.Mark Larrimore - 1999 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 29 (sup1):99-125.
    (1999). Sublime Waste: Kant on the Destiny of the ‘Races’. Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 29, Supplementary Volume 25: Civilization and Oppression, pp. 99-125.
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  5.  34
    Sublime Waste.Mark Larrimore - 1999 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 29 (Supplement):99-125.
  6. Introduction: Religious Selves, Secular Selves.Mark Larrimore - 2009 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 76 (4):1069-1071.
     
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  7. The Problem of Evil: A Reader.Mark Larrimore - 2000 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    This _Reader_ brings together primary sources from philosophy, theology and literature to chart the many and changing ways evil has been approached and understood, and to examine the diverse implications it has had for belief and unbelief. Will fill a major gap in the publishing market. Provides primary source readings for courses on religion and evil. A key issue in religious thought - this book will change the way the subject is taught. Author is one of the brightest young religious (...)
     
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  8.  19
    Author Meets Readers.Dan Flory, Leah Kalmanson, Peter K. J. Park, Mark Larrimore & Sonia Sikka - 2017 - Journal of World Philosophies 2 (2).
    The exchange between Peter Park, Dan Flory and Leah Kalmanson on Park’s book Africa, Asia and the History of Philosophy: Racism in the Formation of the Philosophical Canon took place during the APA’s 2016 Central Division meeting on a panel sponsored by the Committee on Asian and Asian-American Philosophers and Philosophies. After having peer-reviewed the exchange, JWP invited Sonia Sikka and Mark Larrimore to engage with these papers. All the five papers are being published together in this issue.
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  9. The German Invention of Race.Sara Eigen & Mark Larrimore (eds.) - 2006 - State University of New York Press.
    Illuminates the emergence of race as a central concept in philosophy and the social sciences.
     
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  10.  24
    Orientalism andAntivoluntarism in the History of Ethics: On Christian Wolff's.Mark Larrimore - 2000 - Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (2):189-219.
    Christian Wolff's 1721 "Discourse on the Practical Philosophy of the Chinese" is generally read as championing the autonomy of ethics from religion. This is too simple: Wolff's ethics was an antivoluntarist "religious" ethics. The example of the Chinese confirmed for Wolff that revelation is not necessary for knowledge or practice of genuine virtue, though he held that the Chinese achieve only the first of three "degrees of virtue." (Most Christians, including the Pietists who drove Wolff from Halle shortly after he (...)
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  11.  20
    Fortschritt Und Vernunft: Zur Geschichtsphilosophie Kants.Mark Larrimore - 1998 - Review of Metaphysics 52 (2):462-463.
    Fortschritt und Vernunft establishes that Immanuel Kant’s little-known philosophy of history is serious, important, and consistent, coherent with his critical philosophy as well as with his ethics. Pauline Kleingeld argues persuasively that the “specifically Kantian” elements of Kant’s views are lost when the “somewhat awkward sentence ‘Kant claims that there are reasons to assume that there is progress in history’ is shortened to ‘Kant claims that there is progress in history’”. It is these “specifically Kantian” aspects that Kleingeld illuminates and (...)
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  12.  27
    Evil and Wonder in Early Modern Philosophy.Mark Larrimore - 2004 - Teaching New Histories of Philosophy:51-60.
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  13. The Ethics of Leibniz' "Theodicy".Mark Joseph Larrimore - 1994 - Dissertation, Princeton University
    This dissertation challenges two myths about Leibniz' Theodicy: that it is primarily concerned with the problem of evil, and that its ethical implications are reactionary. ;Leibniz' neologism "theodicy" connotes not the justification of God, but the justice of God, a justice Leibniz is at pains to make us realize is no different from our own; we are "little gods." This makes God's world-choice a models for an ethics and politics of imitatio dei, and undermines the unspoken "theodicy or ethics" assumption (...)
     
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