Results for 'Mark Motion'

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  1.  13
    EEG Markers of Visually Experienced Self-Motion.Barry Robert, Palmisano Stephen, Schira Mark, De Blasio Frances, Karamacoska Diana & MacDonald Brett - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  2. Motion, Emotion, and Love: The Nature of Artistic Performance.Thomas Carson Mark - 2012 - Gia Publications.
     
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  3.  6
    Danto, Paul Roth, and Others. The Paper Argues That the Notion of an Ideal Chronicle, a Notion First Introduced by Danto, Can in Fact Be Seen as One Way of Representing the Objective Narrative to Which Good History Aspires.Mark Motion - 1993 - European Journal of Philosophy 1 (1).
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  4.  6
    The Perpetual Motion Machine of Mark Antony Zimara.G. Kasten Tallmadge - 1941 - Isis 33 (1):8-14.
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  5. The Now and the Relation Between Motion and Time in Aristotle: A Systematic Reconstruction.Mark Sentesy - 2018 - Apeiron 51 (3):279-323.
    This paper reconstructs the relationship between the now, motion, and number in Aristotle to clarify the nature of the now, and, thereby, the relationship between motion and time. Although it is clear that for Aristotle motion, and, more generally, change, are prior to time, the nature of this priority is not clear. But if time is the number of motion, then the priority of motion can be grasped by examining his theory of number. This paper (...)
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  6.  23
    The Role of Models in the Process of Epistemic Integration: The Case of the Reichardt Motion Detector.Daniel S. Brooks - 2014 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 36 (1):90-113.
    Recent work on epistemic integration in the life sciences has emphasized the importance of integration in thinking about explanatory practice in science, particularly for articulating a robust alternative to reductionism and anti-reductionism. This paper analyzes the role of models in balancing the relative contributions of lower- and higher-level epistemic resources involved in this process. Integration between multiple disciplines proceeds by constructing a problem agenda (Love 2008), a set of interrelated problems that structures the problem space of a complex phenomenon that (...)
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  7.  26
    Perception of Motion Affects Language Processing.Michael P. Kaschak, Carol J. Madden, David J. Therriault, Richard H. Yaxley, Mark Aveyard, Adrienne A. Blanchard & Rolf A. Zwaan - 2005 - Cognition 94 (3):B79 - B89.
  8.  14
    Perception of Auditory Motion Affects Language Processing.Michael P. Kaschak, Rolf A. Zwaan, Mark Aveyard & Richard H. Yaxley - 2006 - Cognitive Science 30 (4):733-744.
  9.  8
    Mere Exposure in Reverse: Mood and Motion Modulate Memory Bias.Mark Rotteveel & R. Hans Phaf - 2007 - Cognition and Emotion 21 (6):1323-1346.
    Mere exposure, generally, entails influences of familiarity manipulations on affective dependent variables. Previously (Phaf & Rotteveel, 2005), we have argued that familiarity corresponds intrinsically to positive affect, and have extended the correspondence to novelty and negative affect. Here, we present two experiments that show reverse effects of affective manipulations on perceived familiarity. In Experiment 1 affectively valenced exteroceptive cues of approach and avoidance (e.g., apparent movement) modulated recognition bias of neutral targets. This finding suggests that our correspondence hypotheses can be (...)
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  10.  26
    Motion, Scalar Paths, and Lexical Aspect.Jean Mark Gawron - unknown
    • Spatial predicates with both State and Event Readings The fog extended from London toward Paris. • Basic properties to be accounted for.
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  11.  56
    Zeno and Nāgārjuna on Motion.Mark Siderits & J. Dervin O'Brien - 1976 - Philosophy East and West 26 (3):281-299.
  12.  46
    Zeno, Zero and Indeterminate Forms: Instants in the Logic of Motion.Mark Zangari - 1994 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 72 (2):187 – 204.
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  13.  32
    Thought Experiments and Inertial Motion: A Golden Thread in the Development of Mechanics.Mark Shumelda & James Robert Brown - 2009 - Rivista di Estetica 42:71-96.
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  14.  13
    The MindfulBreather: Motion Guided Mindfulness.Tom B. Mole, Julieta Galante, Iona C. Walker, Anna F. Dawson, Laura A. Hannah, Pieter Mackeith, Mark Ainslie & Peter B. Jones - 2017 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11.
  15.  11
    Galileo's Proof for the Earth's Motion From the Movement of Sunspots.A. Mark Smith - 1985 - Isis 76 (4):543-551.
  16.  7
    Aristotle's Distinction Between Motion and Activity.Mark A. Stone - 1985 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 2 (1):11 - 20.
  17.  7
    The Long Decay Model of One-Dimensional Projectile Motion.Mark Joseph Lattery - 2008 - Science & Education 17 (7):779-798.
  18.  7
    Detection of Vehicle Approach in the Presence of Additional Motion and Simulated Observer Motion at Road Junctions.Mark Gould, Damian R. Poulter, Shaun Helman & John P. Wann - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 19 (2):171-184.
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  19.  9
    The Pop Out of Scene-Relative Object Movement Against Retinal Motion Due to Self-Movement.Simon K. Rushton, Mark F. Bradshaw & Paul A. Warren - 2007 - Cognition 105 (1):237-245.
  20.  5
    Infants’ Perceptions of Constraints on Object Motion as a Function of Object Shape.Gelareh Jowkar-Baniani, Angelina Paolozza, Anishka Greene, Cho Kin Cheng & Mark A. Schmuckler - 2017 - Cognition 165:126-136.
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  21.  25
    The Ethics of Motion: Self-Preservation, Preservation of the Whole, and the ‘Double Nature of the Good’ in Francis Bacon.Manzo Silvia - 2016 - In Lancaster Gilgioni (ed.), Motion and Power in Francis Bacon's Philosophy. Springer. pp. 175-200.
    This chapter focuses on the appetite for self-preservation and its central role in Francis Bacon’s natural philosophy. In the first part, I introduce Bacon’s classification of universal appetites, showing the correspondences between natural and moral philosophy. I then examine the role that appetites play in his theory of motions and, additionally, the various meanings accorded to preservation in this context. I also discuss some of the sources underlying Bacon’s ideas, for his views about preservation reveal traces of Stoicism, Telesian natural (...)
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  22. Seeing Motion and Apparent Motion.Christoph Hoerl - 2015 - European Journal of Philosophy 23 (3):676-702.
    In apparent motion experiments, participants are presented with what is in fact a succession of two brief stationary stimuli at two different locations, but they report an impression of movement. Philosophers have recently debated whether apparent motion provides evidence in favour of a particular account of the nature of temporal experience. I argue that the existing discussion in this area is premised on a mistaken view of the phenomenology of apparent motion and, as a result, the space (...)
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  23.  20
    Absolute and Relative Motion.Marius Stan - forthcoming - In Charles T. Wolfe & Dana Jalobeanu (eds.), Encyclopedia of Early Modern Philosophy and the Sciences.
    Modern philosophy of physics debates whether motion is absolute or relative. The debate began in the 1600s, so it deserves a close look here. Primarily, it was a controversy in metaphysics, but it had epistemic aspects too. I begin with the former, and then touch upon the latter at the end.
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  24.  38
    Change and Contradiction: A Criticism of the Hegelian Account of Motion.Emiliano Boccardi - 2019 - In Rodrigo Freire Edgar Almeida & Alexandre Costa-Leite (eds.), Seminário Lógica no Avião. Brasilia: Universidade de Brasilia. pp. 135-148.
    In his In Contradiction (1987), Priest levelled three powerful arguments against the received Russellian view of change and motion. He argued that his preferred paraconsistent theory of change, the Hegelian account, is immune from these objections. Here I argue that these three arguments are sound, but that the Hegelian account falls pray to them too. I conclude, however, that the Hegelian account is in a better position to tackle these challenges.
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  25. Illusions of Optimal Motion, Relationism, and Perceptual Content.Santiago Echeverri - 2017 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 98 (S1):146-173.
    Austere relationism rejects the orthodox analysis of hallucinations and illusions as incorrect perceptual representations. In this article, I argue that illusions of optimal motion present a serious challenge for this view. First, I submit that austere-relationist accounts of misleading experiences cannot be adapted to account for IOMs. Second, I show that any attempt at elucidating IOMs within an austere-relationist framework undermines the claim that perceptual experiences fundamentally involve relations to mind-independent objects. Third, I develop a representationalist model of IOMs. (...)
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  26.  65
    Actual and Non-Actual Motion: Why Experientialist Semantics Needs Phenomenology.Johan Blomberg & Jordan Zlatev - 2014 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (3):395-418.
    Experientialist semantics has contributed to a broader notion of linguistic meaning by emphasizing notions such as construal, perspective, metaphor, and embodiment, but has suffered from an individualist concept of meaning and has conflated experiential motivations with conventional semantics. We argue that these problems can be redressed by methods and concepts from phenomenology, on the basis of a case study of sentences of non-actual motion such as “The mountain range goes all the way from Mexico to Canada.” Through a phenomenological (...)
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  27. Language and Memory for Motion Events: Origins of the Asymmetry Between Source and Goal Paths.Laura Lakusta & Barbara Landau - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (3):517-544.
    When people describe motion events, their path expressions are biased toward inclusion of goal paths (e.g., into the house) and omission of source paths (e.g., out of the house). In this paper, we explored whether this asymmetry has its origins in people’s non-linguistic representations of events. In three experiments, 4-year-old children and adults described or remembered manner of motion events that represented animate/intentional and physical events. The results suggest that the linguistic asymmetry between goals and sources is not (...)
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  28.  23
    Aristotle’s Science of Matter and Motion.Christopher Byrne - 2018 - Toronto, Canada: University of Toronto Press.
    Although Aristotle's contribution to biology has long been recognized, there are many philosophers and historians of science who still hold that he was the great delayer of natural science, calling him the man who held up the Scientific Revolution by two thousand years. They argue that Aristotle never considered the nature of matter as such or the changes that perceptible objects undergo simply as physical objects; he only thought about the many different, specific natures found in perceptible objects. Against this (...)
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  29. How Marking in Dance Constitutes Thinking with the Body.David Kirsh - 2011 - The External Mind:183-214.
    In dance, there is a practice called ‘marking’. When dancers mark, they execute a dance phrase in a simplified, schematic or abstracted form. Based on our interviews with professional dancers in the classical, modern, and contemporary traditions, it is fair to assume that most dancers mark in the normal course of rehearsal and practice. When marking, dancers use their body-in-motion to represent some aspect of the full-out phrase they are thinking about. Their stated reason for marking is (...)
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  30. Kant’s Early Theory of Motion.Marius Stan - 2009 - The Leibniz Review 19:29-61.
    This paper examines the young Kant’s claim that all motion is relative, and argues that it is the core of a metaphysical dynamics of impact inspired by Leibniz and Wolff. I start with some background to Kant’s early dynamics, and show that he rejects Newton’s absolute space as a foundation for it. Then I reconstruct the exact meaning of Kant’s relativity, and the model of impact he wants it to support. I detail (in Section II and III) his polemic (...)
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  31. On Classical Motion.C. D. McCoy - 2018 - Philosophers' Imprint 18.
    The impetus theory of motion states that to be in motion is to have a non-zero velocity. The at-at theory of motion states that to be in motion is to be at different places at different times, which in classical physics is naturally understood as the reduction of velocities to position developments. I first defend the at-at theory against the criticism raised by Arntzenius that it renders determinism impossible. I then develop a novel impetus theory of (...)
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  32.  72
    Source-Goal Asymmetries in Motion Representation: Implications for Language Production and Comprehension.Anna Papafragou - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (6):1064-1092.
    Recent research has demonstrated an asymmetry between the origins and endpoints of motion events, with preferential attention given to endpoints rather than beginnings of motion in both language and memory. Two experiments explore this asymmetry further and test its implications for language production and comprehension. Experiment 1 shows that both adults and 4-year-old children detect fewer within-category changes in source than goal objects when tested for memory of motion events; furthermore, these groups produce fewer references to source (...)
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  33. Rigid Body Motion in Special Relativity.Jerrold Franklin - 2013 - Foundations of Physics 43 (12):1489-1501.
    We study the acceleration and collisions of rigid bodies in special relativity. After a brief historical review, we give a physical definition of the term ‘rigid body’ in relativistic straight line motion. We show that the definition of ‘rigid body’ in relativity differs from the usual classical definition, so there is no difficulty in dealing with rigid bodies in relativistic motion. We then describe The motion of a rigid body undergoing constant acceleration to a given velocity.The acceleration (...)
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  34. Why Zeno’s Paradoxes of Motion Are Actually About Immobility.Bathfield Maël - 2018 - Foundations of Science 23 (4):649-679.
    Zeno’s paradoxes of motion, allegedly denying motion, have been conceived to reinforce the Parmenidean vision of an immutable world. The aim of this article is to demonstrate that these famous logical paradoxes should be seen instead as paradoxes of immobility. From this new point of view, motion is therefore no longer logically problematic, while immobility is. This is convenient since it is easy to conceive that immobility can actually conceal motion, and thus the proposition “immobility is (...)
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  35.  63
    Instantaneous Motion.John W. Carroll - 2002 - Philosophical Studies 110 (1):49 - 67.
    There is a longstanding definition of instantaneous velocity. It saysthat the velocity at t 0 of an object moving along a coordinate line is r if and only if the value of the first derivative of the object's position function at t 0 is r. The goal of this paper is to determine to what extent this definition successfully underpins a standard account of motion at an instant. Counterexamples proposed by Michael Tooley (1988) and also by John Bigelow and (...)
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  36. The Philosophy of Motion Pictures.Noël Carroll - 2007 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Philosophy of Motion Pictures_ is a first-of-its-kind, bottom-up introduction to this bourgeoning field of study. Topics include film as art, medium specificity, defining motion pictures, representation, editing, narrative, emotion and evaluation. Clearly written and supported with a wealth of examples Explores characterizations of key elements of motion pictures –the shot, the sequence, the erotetic narrative, and its modes of affective address.
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  37.  50
    Does Grammatical Aspect Affect Motion Event Cognition? A Cross-Linguistic Comparison of English and Swedish Speakers.Panos Athanasopoulos & Emanuel Bylund - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (2):286-309.
    In this article, we explore whether cross-linguistic differences in grammatical aspect encoding may give rise to differences in memory and cognition. We compared native speakers of two languages that encode aspect differently (English and Swedish) in four tasks that examined verbal descriptions of stimuli, online triads matching, and memory-based triads matching with and without verbal interference. Results showed between-group differences in verbal descriptions and in memory-based triads matching. However, no differences were found in online triads matching and in memory-based triads (...)
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  38. The Essence of Response-Dependence.Ralph Wedgwood - 1997 - European Review of Philosophy 3:31-54.
    Many philosophers have thought that colours or flavours or values are in some way less objective than shape or mass or motion. This paper explores the approach to capturing this thought that is based on the idea of ‘ response-dependence ’. First, it is argued that the conceptions of response-dependence developed by Mark Johnston, Philip Pettit and Crispin Wright fail to capture this thought adequately. Then, the rest of the paper proposes an alternative conception, based in part on (...)
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  39. Nāgārjuna’s Arguments on Motion Revisited.Jan Westerhoff - 2008 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 36 (4):455-479.
    This paper discusses a somewhat neglected reading of the second chapter of Nāgārjuna’s Mūlamadhyamakakārikā, arguing that the main focus of a crucial part is a particular theory of properties and their relation to individuals they instantiate, rather than the refutation of specific assumptions about the nature of space and time. Some of Nāgārjuna’s key arguments about motion should be understood as argument templates in which notions other than mover, motion, and so forth could be substituted. The remainder of (...)
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  40.  57
    Theories of Apparent Motion.Valtteri Arstila - 2016 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 15 (3):337-358.
    Apparent motion is an illusion in which two sequentially presented and spatially separated stimuli give rise to the experience of one moving stimulus. This phenomenon has been deployed in various philosophical arguments for and against various theories of consciousness, time consciousness and the ontology of time. Nevertheless, philosophers have continued working within a framework that does not reflect the current understanding of apparent motion. The main objectives of this paper are to expose the shortcomings of the explanations provided (...)
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  41.  85
    Leibniz on Motion and the Equivalence of Hypotheses.Anja Jauernig - 2008 - The Leibniz Review 18:1-40.
    Contrary to popular belief, I argue that Leibniz is not hopelessly confused about motion: Leibniz is indeed both a relativist and an absolutist about motion, as suggested by the textual evidence, but, appearances to the contrary, this is not a problem; Leibniz’s infamous doctrine of the equivalence of hypotheses is well-supported and well-integrated within Leibniz’s physical theory; Leibniz’s assertion that the simplest hypothesis of several equivalent hypotheses can be held to be true can be explicated in such a (...)
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  42.  20
    English and Chinese Children’s Motion Event Similarity Judgments.Yinglin Ji & Jill Hohenstein - 2018 - Cognitive Linguistics 29 (1):45-76.
    This study explores the relationship between language and thought in similarity judgments by testing how monolingual children who speak languages with partial typological differences in motion description respond to visual motion event stimuli. Participants were either Chinese- or English-speaking, 3-year-olds, 8-year-olds and adults who judged the similarity between caused motion scenes in a match-to-sample task. The results suggest, first of all, that the two younger groups of 3-year-olds are predominantly path-oriented, irrespective of language, as evidenced by their (...)
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  43.  18
    Mechanistic Explanation in Physics.Laura Felline - forthcoming - In Eleanor Knox & Alastair Wilson (eds.), Routledge Companion for the Philosophy of Physics. Routledge.
    The idea at the core of the New Mechanical account of explanation can be summarized in the claim that explaining means showing ‘how things work’. This simple motto hints at three basic features of Mechanistic Explanation (ME): ME is an explanation-how, that implies the description of the processes underlying the phenomenon to be explained and of the entities that engage in such processes. These three elements trace a fundamental contrast with the view inherited from Hume and later from strict logical (...)
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  44. Breaking the Silence: Motion Silencing and Experience of Change.Ian Phillips - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 168 (3):693-707.
    The naïve view of temporal experience (Phillips, in: Lloyd D, Arstila V (eds) Subjective time: the philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience of temporality, forthcoming-a) comprises two claims. First, that we are perceptually aware of temporal properties, such as succession and change. Second, that for any temporal property apparently presented in experience, our experience itself possesses that temporal property. In his paper ‘Silencing the experience of change’ (forthcoming), Watzl argues that this second naïve inheritance thesis faces a novel counter-example in the form (...)
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  45. The Philosopher at the End of the Universe: Philosophy Explained Through Science Fiction Films.Mark Rowlands - 2003 - T. Dunne Books/St. Martin's Press.
    The Philosopher at the End of the Universe demonstrates how anyone can grasp the basic concepts of philosophy while still holding a bucket of popcorn. Mark Rowlands makes philosophy utterly relevant to our everyday lives and reveals its most potent messages using nothing more than a little humor and the plotlines of some of the most spectacular, expensive, high-octane films on the planet. Learn about: The Nature of Reality from The Matrix, Good and Evil from Star Wars, Morality from (...)
     
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  46. Leibniz and the Metaphysics of Motion.Edward Slowik - 2013 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 2:56-77.
    This essay develops a interpretation of Leibniz’ theory of motion that strives to integrate his metaphysics of force with his doctrine of the equivalence of hypotheses, but which also supports a realist, as opposed to a fully idealist, interpretation of his natural philosophy. Overall, the modern approaches to Leibniz’ physics that rely on a fixed spacetime backdrop, classical mechanical constructions, or absolute speed, will be revealed as deficient, whereas a more adequate interpretation will be advanced that draws inspiration from (...)
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  47. Where is My Mind? Mark Rowlands on the Vehicles of Cognition.Andreas Elpidorou - 2012 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 3 (1):145-160.
    Do our minds extend beyond our brains? In a series of publications, Mark Rowlands has argued that the correct answer to this question is an affirmative one. According to Rowlands, certain types of operations on bodily and worldly structures should be considered to be proper and literal parts of our cognitive and mental processes. In this article, I present and critically evaluate Rowlands' position.
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  48.  68
    Comparing Biological Motion in Two Distinct Human Societies.Pierre Pica, Stuart Jackson, Randolph Blake & Nikolaus Troje - 2011 - PLoS ONE 6 (12):e28391.
    Cross cultural studies have played a pivotal role in elucidating the extent to which behavioral and mental characteristics depend on specific environmental influences. Surprisingly, little field research has been carried out on a fundamentally important perceptual ability, namely the perception of biological motion. In this report, we present details of studies carried out with the help of volunteers from the Mundurucu indigene, a group of people native to Amazonian territories in Brazil. We employed standard biological motion perception tasks (...)
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  49. Scala and the Spinning Spheres.Dean W. Zimmerman - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (2):398 - 405.
    I have argued that contemporary humeans face a trilemma: either give up temporal parts, deny the humean supervenience of causal relations, or deny the possibility of there being a difference between rotating and nonrotating homogeneous spheres. Mark Scala describes an interesting class of seemingly possible objects, spinning and stationary simples; and argues their possibility undermines my argument. I argue that it does not. And I conclude with a more general assessment of the status of objections to humeanism from the (...)
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  50.  67
    Motion and Rest as Genuinely Greatest Kinds in the Sophist.Christopher Buckels - 2015 - Ancient Philosophy 35 (2):317-327.
    The paper argues that Motion and Rest are “greatest kinds” and not just convenient examples, since they are all-pervading. Thus Motion and Rest can be jointly predicated of a single subject and can be predicated of each other, just as Sameness and Otherness can. While Sameness and Otherness are opposites, a single subject may be the same in one respect, namely, the same as itself, and other in another respect, namely, other than other things. Thus they can be (...)
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