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  1.  40
    Patient Autonomy and the Challenge of Clinical Uncertainty.Mark Parascandola, Jennifer Hawkins & Marion Danis - 2002 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 12 (3):245-264.
    : Bioethicists have articulated an ideal of shared decision making between physician and patient, but in doing so the role of clinical uncertainty has not been adequately confronted. In the face of uncertainty about the patient's prognosis and the best course of treatment, many physicians revert to a model of nondisclosure and nondiscussion, thus closing off opportunities for shared decision making. Empirical studies suggest that physicians find it more difficult to adhere to norms of disclosure in situations where there is (...)
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  2.  33
    Skepticism, Statistical Methods, and the Cigarette: A Historical Analysis of a Methodological Debate.Mark Parascandola - 2004 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 47 (2):244-261.
  3.  20
    The epidemiologic transition and changing concepts of causation and causal inference.Mark Parascandola - 2012 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 65 (2):243-262.
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  4.  37
    Philosophy in the Laboratory: The Debate Over Evidence for E. J. Steele's Lamarckian Hypothesis.Mark Parascandola - 1995 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 26 (3):469-492.
  5.  17
    Scientific Reasoning in an Imperfect World.Mark Parascandola - 1997 - Bioessays 19 (9):745-746.
  6.  23
    Chances, Individuals and Toxic Torts.Mark Parascandola - 1997 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 14 (2):147–158.
  7.  4
    Evidence and Association: Epistemic Confusion in Toxic Tort Law.Mark Parascandola - 1996 - Philosophy of Science 63 (5):S168-S176.
    Attempts at quantification turn up in many areas within the modern courtroom, but nowhere more than in the realm of toxic tort law. Evidence, in these cases, is routinely presented in statistical form. The vagueness inherent in phrases such as 'balance of probabilities' and 'more likely than not' is reinterpreted to correspond to precise mathematical values. Standing alone these developments would not be a cause for great concern. But in practice courts and commentators have routinely mixed up incompatible quantities, leading (...)
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  8.  35
    Evidence and Association: Epistemic Confusion in Toxic Tort Law.Mark Parascandola - 1996 - Philosophy of Science 63 (3):176.
    Attempts at quantification turn up in many areas within the modern courtroom, but nowhere more than in the realm of toxic tort law. Evidence, in these cases, is routinely presented in statistical form. The vagueness inherent in phrases such as 'balance of probabilities' and 'more likely than not' is reinterpreted to correspond to precise mathematical values. Standing alone these developments would not be a cause for great concern. But in practice courts and commentators have routinely mixed up incompatible quantities, leading (...)
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  9.  9
    Uncertain Science and a Failure of Trust.Mark Parascandola - 2002 - Isis 93 (4):559-584.
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  10.  8
    The Greening of Ethics. From Anthropocentrism to Deep‐Green Theory.Mark Parascandola - 1996 - Philosophical Books 37 (4):274-275.
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  11.  6
    Uncertain Science and a Failure of Trust.Mark Parascandola - 2002 - Isis 93:559-584.
    In the late 1970s, the U.S. Congress was debating a number of different proposals to provide monetary compensation to residents of Utah and Nevada who had been exposed to radioactive fallout from government nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s. Yet scientists and government officials expressed concern that such a program would end up compensating many people for cancers that were not caused by the fallout. Thus, after much debate, Congress directed the National Institutes of Health to produce a set of (...)
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  12.  4
    Review. Brute Science: Dilemmas of Animal Experimentation. Hugh LaFollette, Niall Shanks. [REVIEW]Mark Parascandola - 1997 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 48 (4):621-624.
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  13. Essay Reviews-The One and the Many.Mark Parascandola - 1999 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 30 (4):537-544.
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