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Mark Sagoff [81]Mark Henry Sagoff [1]
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Profile: Mark Sagoff
  1.  6
    The Economy of the Earth.Mark Sagoff - 1990 - Law and Philosophy 9 (2):217-221.
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  2. Price, Principle, and the Environment.Mark Sagoff - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    Mark Sagoff has written an engaging and provocative book about the contribution economics can make to environmental policy. Sagoff argues that economics can be helpful in designing institutions and processes through which people can settle environmental disputes. However, he contends that economic analysis fails completely when it attempts to attach value to environmental goods. It fails because preference-satisfaction has no relation to any good. Economic valuation lacks data because preferences cannot be observed. Willingness to pay is benchmarked on market price (...)
     
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  3.  27
    Are There General Causal Forces in Ecology?Mark Sagoff - 2016 - Synthese 193 (9).
    In this paper, I adopt the view that if general forces or processes can be detected in ecology, then the principles or models that represent them should provide predictions that are approximately correct and, when not, should lead to the sorts of intervening factors that usually make trouble. I argue that Lotka–Volterra principles do not meet this standard; in both their simple “strategic” and their complex “tactical” forms they are not approximately correct of the findings of the laboratory experiments and (...)
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  4. Do Non-Native Species Threaten the Natural Environment?Mark Sagoff - 2005 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (3):215-236.
    Conservation biologists and other environmentalists confront five obstacles in building support for regulatory policies that seek to exclude or remove introduced plants and other non-native species that threaten to harm natural areas or the natural environment. First, the concept of “harm to the natural environment” is nebulous and undefined. Second, ecologists cannot predict how introduced species will behave in natural ecosystems. If biologists cannot define “harm” or predict the behavior of introduced species, they must target all non-native species as potentially (...)
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  5. Genetic Prospects: Essays on Biotechnology, Ethics, and Public Policy.Harold W. Baillie, William A. Galston, Sara Goering, Deborah Hellman, Mark Sagoff, Paul B. Thompson, Robert Wachbroit, David T. Wasserman & Richard M. Zaner - 2003 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The essays in this volume apply philosophical analysis to address three kinds of questions: What are the implications of genetic science for our understanding of nature? What might it influence in our conception of human nature? What challenges does genetic science pose for specific issues of private conduct or public policy?
     
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  6. Ethics of Consumption: The Good Life, Justice, and Global Stewardship.Luis A. Camacho, Colin Campbell, David A. Crocker, Eleonora Curlo, Herman E. Daly, Eliezer Diamond, Robert Goodland, Allen L. Hammond, Nathan Keyfitz, Robert E. Lane, Judith Lichtenberg, David Luban, James A. Nash, Martha C. Nussbaum, ThomasW Pogge, Mark Sagoff, Juliet B. Schor, Michael Schudson, Jerome M. Segal, Amartya Sen, Alan Strudler, Paul L. Wachtel, Paul E. Waggoner, David Wasserman & Charles K. Wilber - 1997 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this comprehensive collection of essays, most of which appear for the first time, eminent scholars from many disciplines—philosophy, economics, sociology, political science, demography, theology, history, and social psychology—examine the causes, nature, and consequences of present-day consumption patterns in the United States and throughout the world.
     
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  7.  6
    The Economy of the Earth: Philosophy, Law, and the Environment.Mark Sagoff - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (4):684-687.
    Mark Sagoff draws on the last twenty years of debate over the foundations of environmentalism in this comprehensive revision of The Economy of the Earth. Posing questions pertinent to consumption, cost-benefit analysis, the normative implications of neo-Darwinism, the role of the natural in national history, and the centrality of the concept of place in environmental ethics, he analyses social policy in relation to the environment, pollution, the workplace, and public safely and health. Sagoff distinguishes ethical from economic questions and explains (...)
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  8.  10
    What Does Environmental Protection Protect?Mark Sagoff - 2013 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (3):239-257.
  9.  6
    Trust Versus Paternalism.Mark Sagoff - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (6):20-21.
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  10.  14
    Further Thoughts About the Human Neuron Mouse.Mark Sagoff - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):51 – 52.
  11.  68
    Values and Preferences.Mark Sagoff - 1986 - Ethics 96 (2):301-316.
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  12. Environmental Harm: Political Not Biological. [REVIEW]Mark Sagoff - 2009 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (1):81-88.
    In their fine paper, Evans et al. discuss the proposition that invasive non-native species are harmful. The question to ask is, “Harmful to whom?” Pathogens that make people sick and pests that damage their property—crops, for example—cause harms of kinds long understood in common law and recognized by public agencies. The concept of “ harm to the environment,” in contrast, has no standing in common law or legislation, no meaning for any empirical science, and no basis in a political consensus (...)
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  13.  34
    Climate Matters: Ethics in a Warming World, by John Broome. [REVIEW]Mark Sagoff - 2014 - Mind 123 (489):194-197.
    Review of John Broome's overview of climate ethics.
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  14. Animal Liberation.Mark Sagoff - forthcoming - Environmental Ethics: Bad Marriage, Quick.
     
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  15. Science, Religion and the Environment.Mark Sagoff - 2007 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 4 (2):313-330.
  16.  4
    The Attributive Logic of “Human-Like” Characteristics.Mark Sagoff - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (2):15-16.
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  17.  72
    On Restoring and Reproducing Art.Mark Sagoff - 1978 - Journal of Philosophy 75 (9):453-470.
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  18.  27
    Intellectual Property and Products of Nature.Mark Sagoff - 2002 - American Journal of Bioethics 2 (3):12 – 13.
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  19.  66
    Do We Consume Too Much?Mark Sagoff - 2000 - The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics 2000:53-74.
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  20.  36
    Free‐Market Versus Libertarian Environmentalism.Mark Sagoff - 1992 - Critical Review 6 (2-3):211-230.
    Libertarians favor a free market for intrinsic reasons: it embodies liberty, accountability, consent, cooperation, and other virtues. Additionally, if property rights against trespasses such as pollution are enforced and if public lands are transferred as private property to environmental groups, a free market may also protect the environment. In contrast, Terry Anderson and Donald Leal's Free Market Environmentalism favors a free market solely on instrumental grounds: markets allocate resources efficiently. The authors apparently follow cost?benefit planners in endorsing a specious tautology (...)
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  21.  44
    On Teaching a Course on Ethics, Agriculture, and the Environment.Mark Sagoff - 1988 - Journal of Agricultural Ethics 1 (1):69-84.
  22.  80
    The Aesthetic Status of Forgeries.Mark Sagoff - 1976 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 35 (2):169-180.
    Original paintings and forgeries are not sufficiently the same sort of thing to have many comparable aesthetic qualities. 1) many aesthetic quality predicates have the form of attributives: they are two-place relations between an object and a class of objects and have a semantic account which requires that the object belongs to the class to which it is related; 2) there is no useful semantic class which contains an original and its forgery and 3) therefore these paintings are not to (...)
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  23. Earthcare: An Anthology in Environmental Ethics.Spencer Abraham, Ray Anderson, Nik Ansell, St Thomas Aquinas, St Francis of Assisi, William Baxter, Philip J. Bentley, Joachim Blatter, Murray Bookchin, Maya Brennan, Majora Carter, Carl Cohen, Deane Curtin, Herman Daly, David DeGrazia, Bill Devall, Calvin DeWitt, David Ehrenfeld, Paul, Anne Ehrlich, Robert Elliot, Stuart Ewen, Nuria Fernandez, Stephen Gardiner, Ramachandra Guha, Garrett Hardin, Eugene Hargrove, John Hasse, Po-Keung Ip, Ralf Isenmann, Kauser Jahan, Marianne B. Karsh, Andrew Kernohan, Marti Kheel, Kenneth Kraft, Aldo Leopold, Miriam MacGillis, Juan Martinez-Alier, Ed McGaa, Katie McShane, Roberto Mechoso, Arne Naess, Seyyed Hossein Nasr, Michael Nelson, Bryan Norton, Philip Nyhus, John O'Neil, Stephen Pacala, Ernest Partridge, Erv Peterson, Tom Regan, Holmes Rolston Iii, Lily-Marlene Russow, Mark Sagoff, Kristin Schrader-Frechette, Erroll Schweizer, George Sessions, Vandana Shiva, Peter Singer, Stephen Socolow, Paul Steidlmeier, Richard Sylvan, Bron Taylor & Paul Taylor - 2009 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Earthcare: Readings and Cases in Environmental Ethics presents a diverse collection of writings from a variety of authors on environmental ethics, environmental science, and the environmental movement overall. Exploring a broad range of world views, religions and philosophies, David W. Clowney and Patricia Mosto bring together insightful thoughts on the ethical issues arising in various areas of environmental concern.
     
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  24. On the Aesthetic and Economic Value of Art.Mark Sagoff - 1981 - British Journal of Aesthetics 21 (4):318-329.
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  25.  6
    Art and Identity: A Reply to Stopford.Mark Sagoff - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (3):319-329.
    Richard Stopford, in criticizing my defense of purist restoration, attributes to me and refutes a metaphysical view I do not have concerning the identity and persistence conditions of an art work. I took for granted the ordinary idea of identity as continuity-in-space-and-time-under-a-sortal-concept, such as statue. I argued that Michelangelo’s Pietà remained the same statue after it was disfigured but that the damage was irreparable. By fixing molded prosthetics to the ruined work of art, the Vatican introduced a macaronic element into (...)
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  26.  9
    Zuckerman's Dilemma.Mark Sagoff - 1991 - Hastings Center Report 21 (5):32-40.
  27.  23
    Fact and Value in Ecological Science.Mark Sagoff - 1985 - Environmental Ethics 7 (2):99-116.
    Ecologists may apply their science either to manage ecosystems to increase the long-run benefits nature offers man or to protect ecosystems from anthropogenie insults and injuries. Popular reasons for supposing that these two tasks (management and protection) are complementary turn out not to be supported by the evidence. Nevertheless, society recognizes the protection of the “health” and “integrity” of ecosystems to be an important ethical and cultural goal even if it cannot be backed in detail by utilitarian or prudential arguments. (...)
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  28.  16
    A Transcendental Argument for the Concept of Personhood in Neuroscience.Mark Sagoff - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):72-73.
  29.  22
    On Teaching a Course on Ethics, Agriculture, and the Environment: Part II.Mark Sagoff - 1988 - Journal of Agricultural Ethics 1 (2):87-100.
  30.  13
    Biotechnology and the Environment: What is at Risk? [REVIEW]Mark Sagoff - 1988 - Agriculture and Human Values 5 (3):26-35.
    This paper argues that the new biotechnologies will affect the natural environment primarily in two ways: by bringing relatively “wild” areas, such as forests and estuaries, under domestication, and by forcing areas now domesticated, such as farms, out of production, because of surpluses. The problem of the safety of biotechnology—the risk of some inadvertent side-effect—seems almost trivial in relation to the social and economic implications of these intentional uses. The paper proposes that we should be more concerned about the successful (...)
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  31.  7
    On the Definition of Ecology.Mark Sagoff - 2017 - Biological Theory 12 (2):85-98.
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  32.  74
    Who is the Invader? Alien Species, Property Rights, and the Police Power.Mark Sagoff - 2009 - Social Philosophy and Policy 26 (2):26-52.
    This paper argues that the occurrence of a non-native species, such as purple loosestrife, on one's property does not constitute a nuisance in the context of background principles of common law. No one is injured by it. The control of non-native species, such as purple loosestrife, does not constitute a compelling public interest, moreover, but represents primarily the concern of an epistemic community of conservation biologists and ecologists. This paper describes a history of cases in agricultural law that establish that (...)
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  33.  53
    Some Problems with Environmental Economics.Mark Sagoff - 1988 - Environmental Ethics 10 (1):55-74.
    In this essay I criticize the contigent valuation method in resource economics and the concepts of utility and efficiency upon which it is based. I consider an example of this method and argue that it cannot-as it pretends-substitute for public education and political deliberation.
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  34.  8
    Extracorporeal Embryos and Three Conceptions of the Human.Mark Sagoff - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (6):52 – 54.
  35. The Business of Consumption: Environmental Ethics and the Global Economy.George G. Brenkert, Donald A. Brown, Rogene A. Buchholz, Herman E. Daly, Richard Dodd, R. Edward Freeman, Eric T. Freyfogle, R. Goodland, Michael E. Gorman, Andrea Larson, John Lemons, Don Mayer, William McDonough, Matthew M. Mehalik, Ernest Partridge, Jessica Pierce, William E. Rees, Joel E. Reichart, Sandra B. Rosenthal, Mark Sagoff, Julian L. Simon, Scott Sonenshein & Wendy Warren - 1998 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    At the forefront of international concerns about global legislation and regulation, a host of noted environmentalists and business ethicists examine ethical issues in consumption from the points of view of environmental sustainability, economic development, and free enterprise.
     
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  36.  29
    On the Economic Value of Ecosystem Services.Mark Sagoff - 2008 - Environmental Values 17 (2):239-257.
    The productive services of nature, such as the ability of fertile soil to grow crops, receive low market prices not because markets fail but because many natural resources, such as good cropland, are abundant relative to effective demand. Even when one pays nothing for a service such as that the wind provides in pollinating crops, this is its 'correct' market price if the supply is adequate and free. The paper argues that ecological services are either too 'lumpy' to price in (...)
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  37.  2
    Fact and Value in Ecological Science.Mark Sagoff - 1985 - Environmental Ethics 7 (2):99-116.
    Ecologists may apply their science either to manage ecosystems to increase the long-run benefits nature offers man or to protect ecosystems from anthropogenie insults and injuries. Popular reasons for supposing that these two tasks are complementary turn out not to be supported by the evidence. Nevertheless, society recognizes the protection of the “health” and “integrity” of ecosystems to be an important ethical and cultural goal even if it cannot be backed in detail by utilitarian or prudential arguments. It is a (...)
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  38.  27
    Paternalism and the Regulation of Drugs.Mark Sagoff - 1984 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 2 (2):43-57.
  39.  1
    What Deserves Appreciation? [REVIEW]Mark Sagoff - 1989 - Hastings Center Report 19 (4):39.
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  40.  55
    Mark Sagoff 's Price, Principle, and the Environment: Two Comments.Bryan Norton, Paul B. Thompson, David Schmidtz, Elizabeth Willott & Mark Sagoff - 2006 - Ethics, Place and Environment 9 (3):337 – 372.
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  41.  26
    Historical Authenticity.Mark Sagoff - 1978 - Erkenntnis 12 (1):83 - 93.
  42.  18
    He Had a Hat.Mark Sagoff - 1985 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 44 (2):191-192.
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  43.  19
    Bad Marriage, Quick Divorce.Mark Sagoff - 2002 - In Ruth F. Chadwick & Doris Schroeder (eds.), Applied Ethics: Critical Concepts in Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 4--115.
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  44.  12
    Do We Need a Land Use Ethic?Mark Sagoff - 1981 - Environmental Ethics 3 (4):293-308.
    In this paper I criticize what many economists recommend: namely, that land use regulations should simulate what markets would do were all resources fully owned and freely exchanged. I argue that this “efficiency” approach, even if balanced with equity considerations, will result in commercial sprawl, an environment that consumers pay for, but one that appalls ethical judgment and aesthetic taste. I showthat economic strategies intended to avoid this result are inadequate, and conclude that ethical and aesthetic as well as economic (...)
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  45.  15
    Art and Authenticity: A Reply to Jaworski.Mark Sagoff - 2014 - Journal of Value Inquiry 48 (3):503-515.
    In a thoughtful paper, Peter Martin Jaworski has written, “The debate over originals, authenticity, fakes, duplicates, and forgery got its start in the mid-60s and then continued until the ‘80s.”Peter Martin Jaworski. “In Defense of Fakes and Artistic Treason: Why Visually-Indistinguishable Duplicates Are as Good as the Originals.” Journal of Value Inquiry (2013), pp. 391–405. Quotation at p. 392. The debate, at least insofar as I participated in it, questioned whether original paintings and forgeries were sufficiently alike – sufficiently the (...)
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  46.  2
    Unpopular Essays on Technological Progress.Mark Sagoff & Nicholas Rescher - 1983 - Philosophical Review 92 (3):450.
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  47.  2
    Morality and the Logical Subject of Intentions.Mark Sagoff - 1977 - Philosophy Research Archives 3:537-552.
    This paper interprets Kant's theory of right on analogy with his theory of truth. The familiar distinction is presented between the mental act and its object: e.g. between the act of believing and the belief; the perceiving and the thing perceived; the act of willing and the action willed. The act of mind is always private; different people, however, can perceive and believe the same or contradictory things. The notion of truth depends on the intersubjectivity or universalizability of the mental (...)
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  48.  27
    Environmental Values in American Culture, Willett Kempton, James S. Boster, and Jennifer A. Hartley.Mark Sagoff - 1998 - Journal of Value Inquiry 32 (1):119-122.
  49.  24
    Book Review:Rational Ecology: Environment and Political Economy. John S. Dryzek. [REVIEW]Mark Sagoff - 1989 - Ethics 100 (1):192-.
  50.  7
    52 Environmental Ethics and Ecological Science.Mark Sagoff - forthcoming - Environmental Ethics: The Big Questions.
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