Results for 'Mark Shaw'

994 found
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  1.  5
    Studies From Princeton Laboratory: Memory for Square Size.J. Mark Baldwin & W. J. Shaw - 1895 - Psychological Review 2 (3):236-239.
  2.  18
    The Clinical Response to Brain Death.Russell Burck, Lisa Anderson-Shaw, Mark Sheldon & Erin A. Egan - 2006 - Jona's Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 8 (2):53-59.
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  3.  23
    The Marxism of George Bernard Shaw 1883-1889.Mark Bevir - 1992 - History of Political Thought 13 (2):299-318.
    There remains a strange gap between Shaw's biographers who assert the importance of Marxism for Shaw during the 1880s and intellectual historians who deny the importance of Marxism for Shaw during the 1880s. My intention is to close this gap by placing Shaw's early beliefs in the context of contemporary Marxism, thereby showing that Shaw was a Marxist and even that his version of Fabianism retained features of his earlier Marxism. Further, I hope thereby to (...)
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  4.  4
    Marxism and Moral Advocacy.William H. Shaw & Mark Overvold - 1988 - Social Philosophy Today 1:59-69.
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  5.  18
    Marxism and Moral Advocacy.William H. Shaw & Mark Overvold - 1988 - Social Philosophy Today 1:59-69.
  6.  12
    Mark T. Finney Resurrection, Hell and the Afterlife: Body and Soul in Antiquity, Judaism and Early Christianity. . Pp. Vii + 203. $140.00 . ISBN 978 1 138 64765 7. [REVIEW]Benjamin C. F. Shaw - forthcoming - Religious Studies:1-5.
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  7.  38
    Critical Theory as an Approach to the Ethics of Information Security.Bernd Carsten Stahl, Neil F. Doherty, Mark Shaw & Helge Janicke - 2014 - Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (3):675-699.
    Information security can be of high moral value. It can equally be used for immoral purposes and have undesirable consequences. In this paper we suggest that critical theory can facilitate a better understanding of possible ethical issues and can provide support when finding ways of addressing them. The paper argues that critical theory has intrinsic links to ethics and that it is possible to identify concepts frequently used in critical theory to pinpoint ethical concerns. Using the example of UK electronic (...)
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  8.  6
    Managing Ethics in the HBP: A Reflective and Dialogical Approach.Bernd Carsten Stahl, Stephen Rainey & Mark Shaw - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 7 (1):20-24.
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  9. Economics, Culture, and Education: Essays in Honor of Mark Blaug.G. K. Shaw (ed.) - 1991 - Edward Elgar.
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  10. Gareth Griffith, "Socialism and Superior Brains: The Political Thought of Bernard Shaw". [REVIEW]Mark Bevir - 1993 - History of Political Thought 14 (4):637.
  11.  12
    If This Retrofuturistic Flu Goes On... On Future Cinema: The Cinematic Imaginary After Film, Edited by Jeffrey Shaw and Peter Weibel. [REVIEW]Mark Bould - 2005 - Film-Philosophy 9 (3).
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  12.  28
    "Dawn and Decline: Notes 1926-1931 and 1950-1960," by Max Horkheimer, Trans. Michael Shaw.Mark G. Roman - 1979 - Modern Schoolman 56 (4):383-384.
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  13.  34
    New Philosophy for New Media.Mark B. N. Hansen - 2004 - MIT Press.
    In New Philosophy for New Media, Mark Hansen defines the image in digital art in terms that go beyond the merely visual. Arguing that the "digital image" encompasses the entire process by which information is made perceivable, he places the body in a privileged position -- as the agent that filters information in order to create images. By doing so, he counters prevailing notions of technological transcendence and argues for the indispensability of the human in the digital era.Hansen examines (...)
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  14.  15
    AI and the Origins of the Functional Programming Language Style.Mark Priestley - 2017 - Minds and Machines 27 (3):449-472.
    The Lisp programming language is often described as the first functional programming language and also as an important early AI language. In the history of functional programming, however, it occupies a rather anomalous position, as the circumstances of its development do not fit well with the widely accepted view that functional languages have been developed through a theoretically-inspired project of deriving practical programming languages from the lambda calculus. This paper examines the origins of Lisp in the early AI programming work (...)
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  15.  12
    "Thick" Aesthetic Emotions and the Autonomy of Art.Mark Silcox - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):415-430.
    For the properly “cultivated,” proclaimed Oscar Wilde in 1890, “beautiful things mean only Beauty.”1 The idea that artworks possess a discrete and autonomous type of value, by virtue of their capacity to provoke a distinctively aesthetic type of response, is most often associated with artists and critics belonging to the modernist tradition of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Certainly, many influential writers of the period who expressed more instrumentalist attitudes toward the value of their own work, such as (...)
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  16.  7
    "Distant and Commonly Faint and Disfigured Originals": Hume's Magna Charta and Sabl's Fundamental Constitutional Conventions.Mark G. Spencer - 2015 - Hume Studies 41 (1):73-80.
    They say you can’t judge a book by its cover. If that is right, it really is too bad in the case of Andrew Sabl’s Hume’s Politics. It is too bad because the reviewer’s job would be exceedingly easy, and very pleasant. By any measure this book has a strikingly fine cover. Its image is drawn from John Byam Liston Shaw’s depiction of Queen Mary and Princess Elizabeth entering London in 1553. Hume’s interpretation of Elizabeth I plays a prominent (...)
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  17. The Nature of Love, Volume 3: The Modern World.Irving Singer - 1989 - University of Chicago Press.
    "In this concluding volume of his impressive study of the history of Western thought about the nature of love, Irving Singer reviews the principal efforts that have been made by 20th-Century thinkers to analyze the phenomenon of love.... [T]he bulk of the book is taken up with critical accounts of the modern thinkers who have systematically called into question the possibility itself of love as a union of distinct human selves. For the most part, these critiques are effectively executed, and (...)
     
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  18. Extended Cognition and the Mark of the Cognitive.Mark Rowlands - 2009 - Philosophical Psychology 22 (1):1 – 19.
    According to the thesis of the extended mind (EM) , at least some token cognitive processes extend into the cognizing subject's environment in the sense that they are (partly) composed of manipulative, exploitative, and transformative operations performed by that subject on suitable environmental structures. EM has attracted four ostensibly distinct types of objection. This paper has two goals. First, it argues that these objections all reduce to one basic sort: all the objections can be resolved by the provision of an (...)
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  19. Is Hypocrisy a Problem for Consequentialism?: William H. Shaw.William H. Shaw - 1999 - Utilitas 11 (3):340-346.
    Eldon Soifer and Béla Szabados argue that hypocrisy poses a problem for consequentialism because the hypocrite, in pretending to live up to a norm he or she does not really accept, acts in ways that have good results. They argue, however, that consequentialists can meet this challenge and show the wrongness of hypocrisy by adopting a desirefulfilment version of their theory. This essay raises some doubts about Soifer and Szabados's proposal and argues that consequentialism has no difficulty coming to grips (...)
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  20.  18
    Chris Shaw on Ethical Issues in Biotechnology. Interview by Thomasine Kushner.C. Shaw - 2001 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (1):97-101.
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  21.  69
    Shaw on Chesterton's Ireland.George Bernard Shaw - 2003 - The Chesterton Review 29 (1/2):211-216.
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  22.  27
    Doing Well and Good: The Human Face of the New Capitalism.Julian Friedland (ed.) - 2009 - Information Age.
    Ethical business creates social value. That’s the theme of this bold new volume, heralding and defending this rapidly-growing new conception of capitalism making its way into the mainstream. It provides clear and succinct guidelines for how to evaluate what counts as an ethical business as well as how and why ethical businesses tend to succeed better over the long term. The book is jargon-free and targeted primarily at thought leaders and academics in business and philosophy who will want to use (...)
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  23. Mathematics: Truth and Fiction? Review of Mark Balaguer's Platonism and Anti-Platonism in Mathematics.Mark Colyvan & Edward N. Zalta - 1999 - Philosophia Mathematica 7 (3):336-349.
    Mark Balaguer’s project in this book is extremely ambitious; he sets out to defend both platonism and fictionalism about mathematical entities. Moreover, Balaguer argues that at the end of the day, platonism and fictionalism are on an equal footing. Not content to leave the matter there, however, he advances the anti-metaphysical conclusion that there is no fact of the matter about the existence of mathematical objects.1 Despite the ambitious nature of this project, for the most part Balaguer does not (...)
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  24. Ontological Independence as the Mark of the Real. Jody Azzouni. Deflating Existential Consequence: A Case for Nominalism. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004. Pp. Viii + 241. ISBN 0-19-515988-8. [REVIEW]Mark Colyvan - 2005 - Philosophia Mathematica 13 (2):216-225.
  25. Desire and What It’s Rational to Do.Ashley Shaw - forthcoming - Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    It is often taken for granted that our desires can contribute to what it is rational for us to do. This paper examines an account of desire—the ‘guise of the good’— that promises an explanation of this datum. I argue that extant guise-of-the-good accounts fail to provide an adequate explanation of how a class of desires—basic desires— contributes to practical rationality. I develop an alternative guise-of-the-good account on which basic desires attune us to our reasons for action in virtue of (...)
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  26.  32
    Currents in Contemporary Ethics: Improve Privacy in Research by Eliminating Informed Consent? IOM Report Misses the Mark.Mark A. Rothstein - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (3):507-512.
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  27. (Book Review) Ontological Independence as the Mark of the Real. [REVIEW]Mark Colyvan - 2005 - Philosophia Mathematica 13 (2):216-225.
  28. Novum Organum Scientiarum, Tr. By P. Shaw, with Notes.Francis Bacon & Peter Shaw - 1802
     
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  29. Ideal Code, Real World: A Rule-Consequentialist Theory of Morality.William H. Shaw - 2001 - Mind 110 (440):1074-1077.
  30. Contemporary Philosophy and J.L. Shaw.Jaysankar Lal Shaw & Purusottama Bilimoria (eds.) - 2006 - Punthi Pustak.
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  31.  49
    The Right to Bodily Integrity and the Rehabilitation of Offenders Through Medical Interventions: A Reply to Thomas Douglas.Elizabeth Shaw - 2019 - Neuroethics 12 (1):97-106.
    Medical interventions such as methadone treatment for drug addicts or “chemical castration” for sex offenders have been used in several jurisdictions alongside or as an alternative to traditional punishments, such as incarceration. As our understanding of the biological basis for human behaviour develops, our criminal justice system may make increasing use of such medical techniques and may become less reliant on incarceration. Academic debate on this topic has largely focused on whether offenders can validly consent to medical interventions, given the (...)
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  32. Schellenberg on Divine Hiddenness and Religious Scepticism: MARK L. McCREARY.Mark L. Mccreary - 2010 - Religious Studies 46 (2):207-225.
    J. L. Schellenberg has constructed major arguments for atheism based on divine hiddenness in two separate works. This paper reviews these arguments and highlights how they are grounded in reflections on perfect divine love. However, Schellenberg also defends what he calls the ‘subject mode’ of religious scepticism. I argue that if one accepts Schellenberg's scepticism, then the foundation of his divine-hiddenness arguments is undermined by calling into question some of his conclusions regarding perfect divine love. In other words, if his (...)
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  33.  97
    Intentions and Trolleys.Joseph Shaw - 2006 - Philosophical Quarterly 56 (222):63 - 83.
    The series of 'trolley' examples issue a challenge to moral principles based on intentions, since it seems that these give the wrong answers in two important cases: 'Fat Man', where they seem to say that it is permissible to push someone in front of a trolley to save others, and 'Loop', where they seem to say that it is wrong to divert a trolley towards a single person whose body will stop it and save others. I reply, first, that there (...)
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  34. Theurgy and the Soul: The Neoplatonism of Iamblichus.Gregory Shaw - 2003 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    _Theurgy and the Soul_ is a study of Iamblichus of Syria, whose teachings set the final form of pagan spirituality prior to the Christianization of the Roman Empire. Gregory Shaw focuses on the theory and practice of theurgy, the most controversial and significant aspect of Iamblichus's Platonism. Theurgy literally means "divine action." Unlike previous Platonists who stressed the elevated status of the human soul, Iamblichus taught that the soul descended completely into the body and thereby required the performance of (...)
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  35.  76
    Direct Brain Interventions and Responsibility Enhancement.Elizabeth Shaw - 2014 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 8 (1):1-20.
    Advances in neuroscience might make it possible to develop techniques for directly altering offenders’ brains, in order to make offenders more responsible and law-abiding. The idea of using such techniques within the criminal justice system can seem intuitively troubling, even if they were more effective in preventing crime than traditional methods of rehabilitation. One standard argument against this use of brain interventions is that it would undermine the individual’s free will. This paper maintains that ‘free will’ (at least, as that (...)
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  36. Contemporary Ethics: Taking Account of Utilitarianism.William Shaw - 1999 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    Aimed at undergraduates, _Contemporary Ethics_ presupposes little or no familiarity with ethics and is written in a clear and engaging style. It provides students with a sympathetic but critical guide to utilitarianism, explaining its different forms and exploring the debates it has spawned. The book leads students through a number of current issues in contemporary ethics that are connected to controversies over and within utilitarianism. At the same time, it uses utilitarianism to introduce students to ethics as a subject. In (...)
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  37. Moral Issues in Business.William H. Shaw - 1998 - Wadsworth.
     
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  38.  4
    Brain Neoplasm and the Potential Impact on Self-Identity.Lisa Anderson-Shaw, Gaston Baslet & J. Lee Villano - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 1 (3):3-7.
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  39.  48
    Towards a Broadening of the Concept of Religious Experience: Some Phenomenological Considerations: Mark Wynn.Mark Wynn - 2009 - Religious Studies 45 (2):147-166.
    The recent philosophical literature on religious experience has mostly been concerned with experiences which are taken by the subject of the experience to be directly of God or some other supernatural entity, or to involve some suspension of the subject–object structure of conventional experience. In this paper I consider a further kind of experience, where the sense of God is mediated by way of an appreciation of the existential meanings which are presented by a material context. In this way the (...)
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  40.  91
    Children Discard a Resource to Avoid Inequity.Alex Shaw & Kristina R. Olson - 2012 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 141 (2):382-395.
  41.  15
    The Quest for Clarity in Research Integrity: A Conceptual Schema.David Shaw - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (4):1085-1093.
    Researchers often refer to “research integrity”, “scientific integrity”, “research misconduct”, “scientific misconduct” and “research ethics”. However, they may use some of these terms interchangeably despite conceptual distinctions. The aim of this paper is to clarify what is signified by several key terms related to research integrity, and to suggest clearer conceptual delineation between them. To accomplish this task, it provides a conceptual analysis based upon definitions and general usage of these phrases and categorization of integrity-breaching behaviours in literature and guidelines, (...)
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  42.  26
    Care and Commitment in Ethical Consumption: An Exploration of the ‘Attitude–Behaviour Gap’.Deirdre Shaw, Robert McMaster & Terry Newholm - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (2):251-265.
    In this paper we argue that greater attention must be given to peoples’ expression of “care” in relation to consumption. We suggest that “caring about” does not necessarily lead to “care-giving,” as conceptualising an attitude–behaviour gap might imply, but that a closer examination of the intensity, morality, and articulation of care can lead to a greater understanding of consumer narratives and, thus, behaviour. To examine this proposition, a purposive sample of self-identified ethical consumers was interviewed. Care is expressed by the (...)
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  43. The Sublime.Philip Shaw - 2006 - Routledge.
    Often labelled as "indescribable," the sublime is a term that has been debated for centuries amongst writers, artists, philosophers and theorists. Usually related to ideas of the great, the awe-inspiring and the overpowering, the sublime has become a complex yet crucial concept in many disciplines. Offering historical overviews and explanations, Philip Shaw looks at: · The legacy of the earliest, classical theories of the sublime through the romantic to the post-modern and avant-garde sublimity · The major theorists of the (...)
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  44. The Social Trackways Theory of the Evolution of Human Cognition.Kim Shaw-Williams - 2014 - Biological Theory 9 (1):1-11.
    Only our lineage has ever used trackways reading to find unseen and unheard targets. All other terrestrial animals, including our great ape cousins, use scent trails and airborne odors. Because trackways as natural signs have very different properties, they possess an information-rich narrative structure. There is good evidence we began to exploit conspecific trackways in our deep past, at first purely associatively, for safety and orienteering when foraging in vast featureless wetlands. Since our own old trackways were recognizable they were (...)
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  45.  52
    Plato's Anti-Hedonism and the "Protagoras".J. Clerk Shaw - 2015 - Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
    Plato often rejects hedonism, but in the "Protagoras", Plato's Socrates seems to endorse hedonism. In this book, J. Clerk Shaw removes this apparent tension by arguing that the "Protagoras" as a whole actually reflects Plato's anti-hedonism. He shows that Plato places hedonism at the core of a complex of popular mistakes about value and especially about virtue: that injustice can be prudent, that wisdom is weak, that courage is the capacity to persevere through fear, and that virtue cannot be (...)
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  46.  10
    An Interview with Mark Kleiman.Mark Allen Kleiman - 1999 - Jona's Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 1 (2):17-22.
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  47. Free Will Skepticism in Law and Society: Challenging Retributive Justice.Elizabeth Shaw, Derk Pereboom & Gregg D. Caruso (eds.) - 2019 - Cambridge University Press.
    'Free will skepticism' refers to a family of views that all take seriously the possibility that human beings lack the control in action - i.e. the free will - required for an agent to be truly deserving of blame and praise, punishment and reward. Critics fear that adopting this view would have harmful consequences for our interpersonal relationships, society, morality, meaning, and laws. Optimistic free will skeptics, on the other hand, respond by arguing that life without free will and so-called (...)
     
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  48. Freedom and Nature in Schelling's Philosophy of Art.Devin Zane Shaw - 2010 - New York, NY, USA: Bloomsbury.
    Schelling is often thought to be a protean thinker whose work is difficult to approach or interpret. Devin Zane Shaw shows that the philosophy of art is the guiding thread to understanding Schelling's philosophical development from his early works in 1795-1796 through his theological turn in 1809-1810. -/- Schelling's philosophy of art is the 'keystone' of the system; it unifies his idea of freedom and his philosophy of nature. Schelling's idea of freedom is developed through a critique of the (...)
     
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  49. Desire and Satisfaction.Ashley Shaw - 2020 - Philosophical Quarterly 70 (279):371-384.
    Desire satisfaction has not received detailed philosophical examination. Yet intuitive judgments about the satisfaction of desires have been used as data points guiding theories of desire, desire content, and the semantics of ‘desire’. This paper examines desire satisfaction and the standard propositional view of desire. Firstly, I argue that there are several distinct concepts of satisfaction. Secondly, I argue that separating them defuses a difficulty for the standard view in accommodating desires that Derek Parfit described as ‘implicitly conditional on their (...)
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  50.  91
    Who is the Invader? Alien Species, Property Rights, and the Police Power: Mark Sagoff.Mark Sagoff - 2009 - Social Philosophy and Policy 26 (2):26-52.
    This paper argues that the occurrence of a non-native species, such as purple loosestrife, on one's property does not constitute a nuisance in the context of background principles of common law. No one is injured by it. The control of non-native species, such as purple loosestrife, does not constitute a compelling public interest, moreover, but represents primarily the concern of an epistemic community of conservation biologists and ecologists. This paper describes a history of cases in agricultural law that establish that (...)
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