Results for 'Marketplace of ideas'

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  1. John Stuart Mill and the “Marketplace of Ideas”.Jill Gordon - 1997 - Social Theory and Practice 23 (2):235-249.
    The expression "the marketplace of ideas" is often used in reference to Mill's views on freedom of thought and speech in On Liberty, but the metaphor does not come from Mill's work, nor is it consistent with his position. A real marketplace of ideas would create what Mill warns us against: the prevalence of the views of the most powerful and/or the most numerous. From a U.S. perspective, I explore Mill's suggestion to "countenance and encourage" minority (...)
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  2.  35
    The Real Marketplace of Ideas.Robert Weissberg - 1996 - Critical Review 10 (1):107-121.
    Abstract ?The marketplace of ideas? is a powerful legal and political metaphor?a bulwark of an open, liberal society?that suggests a positivistic debate utilizing reason and evidence. In reality, however, the marketplace of ideas often consists of illogic and bad evidence, producing clutter and confusion. The parallel with scientific research is misinformed. Evidence from collective decision?making and small group studies cast grave doubts on the ?marketplace's? ability to maximize truth.
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  3.  12
    Linguistic Marketing in a Marketplace of Ideas: Language Choice and Intertextuality in a Nigerian Virtual Community.Presley Ifukor - 2011 - Pragmatics and Society 2 (1):110-147.
    The virtual community under consideration is called theNigerian Village Square, ‘…a marketplace of ideas’. As an online discussion forum, NVS combines the features of listservs and newsgroups with a more elegant and user-friendly interface. While computer-mediated communication technologies augment political discourse in established democracies, new media and mobile technologies create avenues for a virtual sphere among Nigerians. Therefore, the ideal virtual sphere guarantees equal access to all connected netizens, equal right for all languages in netizens’ linguistic repertoire, and (...)
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  4.  15
    The Marketplace of Ideas.Louis Menand - 2010 - W.W. Norton.
    Argues that outdated institutional structures and higher educational philosophies are negatively contrasting with significant changes in today's faculties and student bodies with a result that higher education is more competitive and less ...
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  5.  77
    Free Speech, Autonomy, and the Marketplace of Ideas.Sarah Sorial - 2010 - Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (2):167-183.
  6.  9
    FDA and the Marketplace of Ideas for Medical Products.Nathan Cortez - 2017 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 45 (s2):39-41.
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  7.  13
    Taking Christian Moral Thought Seriously: The Legitimacy of Christian Thought in the Marketplace of Ideas.Jeremy Evans (ed.) - 2011 - Broadman & Holman Academic.
    In Taking Christian Moral Thought Seriously--the first book in the Christian Ethics series--editor Jeremy A. Evans establishes that the separation of church and state is not a principle of the U.S. Constitution (or any other founding ...
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  8.  28
    The Repetition‐Break Plot Structure: A Cognitive Influence on Selection in the Marketplace of Ideas.Jeffrey Loewenstein & Chip Heath - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (1):1-19.
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  9.  21
    A Visible Hand in the Marketplace of Ideas: Precision Measurement as Arbitage.Philip Mirowski - 1994 - Science in Context 7 (3):563-589.
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  10.  14
    John Stuart Mill and the “Marketplace of Ideas”.Gordon Jill - 1997 - Social Theory and Practice 23 (2):235-249.
  11.  4
    Climate Change and the Free Marketplace of Ideas?Matthew Hodgetts & Kevin McGravey - forthcoming - Environmental Values.
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    The Millennium Problem and the Marketplace of Ideas: Insights Into Freedom, Responsibility, and Technological Development.Dennis Cooley & Scott de Vito - 1998 - Public Affairs Quarterly 12 (3):243-286.
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  13.  58
    The Competition of Ideas: Market or Garden?Robert Sparrow & Robert E. Goodin - 2001 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 4 (2):45-58.
    The ‘marketplace of ideas’ is an influential metaphor with widespread currency in debates about freedom of speech. We explore a number of ways competition between ideas might be described as occurring in a marketplace and find that none support the use of the metaphor. We suggest that an alternative metaphor, that of the ‘garden of ideas’, may offer more productive insights into issues surrounding the regulation of speech.
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  14.  32
    Foundations of Academic Freedom: Making New Sense of Some Aging Arguments.Liviu Andreescu - 2009 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 28 (6):499-515.
    The article distinguishes between the various arguments traditionally offered as justifications for the principle of academic freedom. Four main arguments are identified, three consequentialist in nature, and one nonconsequentialist. The article also concentrates on the specific form these arguments must take in order to establish academic freedom as a principle distinct from the more general principles of freedom of expression and intellectual freedom.
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  15.  76
    The Idea of Power and Locke's Taxonomy of Ideas.Patrick J. Connolly - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (1):1-16.
    Locke's account of the idea of power is thought to be seriously problematic. Commentators allege that the idea of power causes problems for Locke's taxonomy of ideas, that it is defined circularly, and that, contrary to Locke's claims, it cannot be acquired in experience. This paper defends Locke's account. Previous commentators have assumed that there is only one idea of power. But close attention to Locke's text, combined with background features of his theory of ideas, supports the drawing (...)
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  16.  50
    Ideas, Persons, and Objects in the History of Ideas.Bennett Gilbert - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 13 (2):141-162.
    The history of ideas is most prominently understood as a highly specialized group of methods for the study of abstract ideas, with both diachronic and synchronic aspects. While theorizing the field has focused on the methods of study, defining the object of study – ideas – has been neglected. But the development of the theories behind material culture studies poses a sharp challenge to these narrow approaches. It both challenges the integrity of the notion of abstract (...) and also offers possibilities for enlarging the scope of the ways in which we can study ideas historically. It is proposed here to regard ideas as mental relations deeply connected to human communication by both thinking and doing. This connection of ideational thought to human production and behavior is a deep foundation for the history of ideas as an interdisciplinary historiographic means of understanding moral life. (shrink)
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  17.  13
    On the Difference Between a Pupil and a Historian of Ideas.Jeffrey Edward Green - 2012 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (1):84-110.
    Abstract This essay takes up the fundamental question of the proper place of history in the study of political thought through critical engagement with Mark Bevir's seminal work, The Logic of the History of Ideas . While I accept the claim of Bevir, as well as of other exponents of the so-called “Cambridge School,“ that there is a conceptual difference between historical and non-historical modes of reading past works of political philosophy, I resist the suggestion that this conceptual differentiation (...)
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  18.  67
    Consciousness, Ideas of Ideas and Animation in Spinoza’s Ethics.Oberto Marrama - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (3):506-525.
    In the following article, I aim to elucidate the meaning and scope of Spinoza’s vocabulary related to ‘consciousness’. I argue that Spinoza, at least in his Ethics, uses this notion consistently, although rarely. He introduces it to account for the knowledge we may have of the mind considered alone, as conceptually distinct from the body. This serves two purposes in Spinoza’s Ethics: to explain our illusion of a free will, on the one hand, and to refer to the knowledge we (...)
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  19.  20
    Does Bevir's The Logic of the History of Ideas Improve Our Understanding of Hegel's Philosophy of Right?Thom Brooks - 2006 - The European Legacy 11 (7):765-774.
    Mark Bevir's The Logic of the History of Ideas has received considerable attention recently. This article highlights a new problem with his weak intentionalism. Bevir's weak intentionalism holds that on occasion the meanings readers ascribe to texts may trump the meanings the authors express in texts. The article uses the example of Hegel's theory of punishment. The received wisdom is that Hegel is a pure retributivist. Yet, this strays far from his text and stated views. We might think we (...)
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  20.  52
    Overlapping Consensus or Marketplace of Religions? Rawls and Smith.Jack Russell Weinstein - 2012 - Philosophia 40 (2):223-236.
    In this paper, I examine the claim that Rawls’s overlapping consensus is too narrow to allow most mainstream religions’ participation in political discourse. I do so by asking whether religious exclusion is a consequence of belief or action, using conversion as a paradigm case. After concluding that this objection to Rawls is, in fact, defensible, and that the overlapping consensus excludes both religious belief and action, I examine an alternative approach to managing religious pluralism as presented by Adam Smith. I (...)
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  21.  28
    A Man of Ideas[REVIEW]Ray Scott Percival - 1997 - New Scientist (2111).
    Review of: Isaiah Berlin’s The Sense of Reality: Studies in Ideas and their History.
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  22. Hume and the Mechanics of Mind : Impressions, Ideas, and Association.David Owen - 2009 - In David Fate Norton & Jacqueline Anne Taylor (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Hume. Cambridge University Press.
    Hume introduced important innovations concerning the theory of ideas. The two most important are the distinction between impressions and ideas, and the use he made of the principles of association in explaining mental phenomena. Hume divided the perceptions of the mind into two classes. The members of one class, impressions, he held to have a greater degree of force and vivacity than the members of the other class, ideas. He also supposed that ideas are causally dependent (...)
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  23. Berkeley and the Causality of Ideas; a Look at PHK 25.Richard Brook - manuscript
    I argue that Berkeley's distinctive idealism/immaterialism can't support his view that objects of sense, immediately or mediately perceived, are causally inert. (The Passivity of Ideas thesis or PI) Neither appeal to ordinary perception, nor traditional arguments, for example, that causal connections are necessary, and we can't perceive such connections, are helpful. More likely it is theological concerns,e.g., how to have second causes if God upholds by continuously creating the world, that's in the background. This puts Berkeley closer to Malebranche (...)
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  24. Words and Images: An Essay on the Origin of Ideas.Christopher Gauker - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    At least since Locke, philosophers and psychologists have usually held that concepts arise out of sensory perceptions, thoughts are built from concepts, and language enables speakers to convey their thoughts to hearers. Christopher Gauker holds that this tradition is mistaken about both concepts and language. The mind cannot abstract the building blocks of thoughts from perceptual representations. More generally, we have no account of the origin of concepts that grants them the requisite independence from language. Gauker's alternative is to show (...)
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  25.  25
    The Basis of Medical Knowledge: Judgement, Objectivity and the History of Ideas.Michael Loughlin - 2009 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (6):935-940.
  26.  23
    From Ideas to Concepts to Metaphors: The German Tradition of Intellectual History and the Complex Fabric of Language.Elías José Palti - 2010 - History and Theory 49 (2):194-211.
    Recently, the diffusion of the so-called “new intellectual history” led to the dismissal of the old school of the “history of ideas” on the basis of its ahistorical nature . This formulation is actually misleading, missing the core of the transformation produced in the field. It is not true that the history of ideas simply ignored the fact that the meaning of ideas changes over time. The issue at stake here is really not how ideas changed (...)
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  27.  28
    Uncertainty and the History of Ideas.Adrian Blau - 2011 - History and Theory 50 (3):358-372.
    ABSTRACTIntellectual historians often make empirical claims, but can never know for certain if these claims are right. Uncertainty is thus inevitable for intellectual historians. But accepting uncertainty is not enough: we should also act on it, by trying to reduce and report it. We can reduce uncertainty by amassing valid data from different sources to weigh the strengths and weaknesses of competing explanations, rather than trying to “prove” an empirical claim by looking for evidence that fits it. Then we should (...)
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  28.  86
    Simple Ideas and Hume’s Missing Shade of Blue.Emily Kelahan - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (3):809-825.
    This paper provides support for the unorthodox view that Hume’s simple ideas are most fruitfully understood as theoretical posits by showing that adopting this interpretation solves a lingering interpretive difficulty, the missing shade of blue. The missing shade of blue is thought to pose a serious challenge to the legitimacy of Hume’s copy principle. Thinking of Humean simple ideas as theoretical posits reveals a dialectical mismatch between Hume and his envisioned reader that, once understood, makes it clear that (...)
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  29. THE PHYSICOCHEMICAL NATURE OF THOUGHTS AND IDEAS: AN ANCIENT INDIAN INSIGHT.Varanasi Ramabrahmam - 2009 - In Proceedings of the Third Vedic Science Conferenceon Chemical Sciences and Technology in Ancient Indiaheld at Bangalore on 23rd, 24th&25th, January, 2009 by National Institute of Vedic Sciences, Bangalore.
    The concept developed in relation to Atman as infrasonic bio-mechanical oscillatorwill be used to delineate the physicochemical nature of thoughts and ideas. The insight available in the Upanishads, the Brahma Sutras, the Vishnu Sahasranaama and LalitaSahasranaama will be used to further and advance the understanding of mechanical, biochemical and electro-chemical nature of human thoughts and ideas. The conceptual clarity about these mental processes will be presented. A pictorial diagram of nature and forms of energy transformations involved in thought (...)
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  30.  32
    It's Not Given Us to Foretell How Our Words Will Echo Through the Ages: The Reception of Novel Ideas by Scientific Community.Valentin Bazhanov - 2009 - Principia: An International Journal of Epistemology 13 (2):129-136.
    The paper reveals some mostly unnoticed and unexpected trends in reception of novel ideas in science. The author formulates certain principles of the reception of these ideas by scientific communities and justifies them by examples from modern mathematics and non-classical logic.
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  31.  13
    The Historians of Philosophy and Late Scholastics: The Case of Descartes' Theory of Ideas.Milidrag Predrag - 2010 - Filozofija I Društvo 21 (1):187-207.
  32.  3
    Le 'way of ideas' et le langage moral.Lia Formigari - 1985 - Histoire Epistémologie Langage 2 (7):15-33.
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  33. Various Conjectures on the Perception, Motion, and Generation of Ideas (1746).David Hartley - 1959 - Los Angeles, William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, University of California.
  34.  42
    The Christian Philosophy of Miracle: Ideas of Thomas Hobbes and John Locke.Valentin Yakovlev - 2019 - TSU Publishing House.
    The author of the monograph is a Candidate of Culturology, Associate Professor of Tyumen State University. The monograph tests approaches to the understanding of the essence of Hobbes’s and Locke’s ideas about miracles that are more flexible than a formational-evolutionist approach. The monograph presents the main characteristics of these ideas as Christian philosophical ones, shows their general Christian direction and the historiographic perspective of studying these ideas primarily in line with Christian philosophy. The monograph is intended for (...)
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  35. Children Apply Principles of Physical Ownership to Ideas.Alex Shaw, Vivian Li & Kristina R. Olson - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (8):1383-1403.
    Adults apply ownership not only to objects but also to ideas. But do people come to apply principles of ownership to ideas because of being taught about intellectual property and copyrights? Here, we investigate whether children apply rules from physical property ownership to ideas. Studies 1a and 1b show that children (6–8 years old) determine ownership of both objects and ideas based on who first establishes possession of the object or idea. Study 2 shows that children (...)
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  36.  61
    Geist and Communication in Kant's Theory of Aesthetic Ideas.Charles DeBord - 2012 - Kantian Review 17 (2):177-190.
    In his Critique of the Power of Judgement, Kant explicates the creation of works of fine art (schöne Kunst) in terms of aesthetic ideas. His analysis of aesthetic ideas claims that they are not concepts (Begriffe) and are therefore not definable or describable in determinate language. Nevertheless, Kant claims that aesthetic ideas are communicable via spirit (Geist), a special mental ability he associates with artistic genius. This paper argues that Kant's notion of Geist is central to his (...)
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  37.  22
    Locke's Way of Ideas as Context for His Theory of Education in Of the Conduct of the Understanding.Paul Schuurman - 2001 - History of European Ideas 27 (1):45-59.
    The central theme of John Locke's Of the Conduct of the Understanding is human error. The Conduct was conceived as an additional chapter to An Essay concerning Understanding, but it was never finished and published posthumously in 1706 as a separate work. Modern authors have regarded the Conduct as an educational treatise. Indeed, the analysis in this work of the nature and causes of error and the ways to prevent and remedy error gives rise to numerous educational reflections. However, the (...)
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  38.  17
    Locke's Way of Ideas as Context for His Theory of Education in Of the Conduct of the Understanding.Paul Schuurman - 2001 - History of European Ideas 27 (1):45-59.
    The central theme of John Locke's Of the Conduct of the Understanding is human error. The Conduct was conceived as an additional chapter to An Essay concerning Understanding, but it was never finished and published posthumously in 1706 as a separate work. Modern authors have regarded the Conduct as an educational treatise. Indeed, the analysis in this work of the nature and causes of error and the ways to prevent and remedy error gives rise to numerous educational reflections. However, the (...)
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  39.  13
    ‘Who Will Write the History of Tears?’ History of Ideas and History of Emotions From Eighteenth-Century France to the Present.Marco Menin - 2014 - History of European Ideas 40 (4):1-17.
    The aim of this article is to shed light on the methodological relationship between the history of ideas and the history of emotions, starting from the conception of weeping in the eighteenth-century French reflection. This period was critical for the defining of the modern concept of emotion because it encompassed the development of a new aesthetic and moral code centred on the exasperation of sensitivity and an exaggerated use of tears. This study brings out, in terms of methodology, the (...)
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  40.  14
    Hugh Trevor-Roper and the History of Ideas.Peter Ghosh - 2011 - History of European Ideas 37 (4):483-505.
    A wave of recent publication connected to Hugh Trevor-Roper offers cause to take stock of his life and legacy. He is an awkward subject because his output was so protean, but a compelling one because of his significance for the resurgence of the history of ideas in Britain after 1945. The article argues that the formative period in Trevor-Roper's life was 1945?57, a period curiously neglected hit her to. It was at this time that the pioneered a history of (...)
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  41.  12
    The Use and Abuse of the Digital Humanities in the History of Ideas: How to Study the Encyclopédie.Marie Leca-Tsiomis - 2013 - History of European Ideas 39 (4):467-476.
    Summary New information technology can be an invaluable aid to research in the history of ideas provided it is built on scientific foundations. This article discusses the case of Diderot and D'Alembert's Encyclopédie and analyses its use of earlier dictionaries (the Dictionnaire de Trévoux, Chambers's Cyclopaedia and Moréri's dictionary). It also shows how neglect of existing research in the history of ideas and ignorance of how these eighteenth-century European publications were elaborated, combined with inappropriate use of software for (...)
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  42.  4
    Whose Logic? Reflections on Gender in the History of Ideas.Jane Garnett - 2002 - History of European Ideas 28 (1-2):77-82.
    The paper challenges Bevir's failure to engage with issues of gender in his attempt to establish a logic of the history of ideas. It argues that this exclusion both compromises his claim to have articulated a comprehensive logic, and suggests the limitations of his model as a way in which we might bring greater subtlety and texture to the understanding of history.
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  43.  5
    Why History of Ideas at All?Melissa Lane - 2002 - History of European Ideas 28 (1-2):33-41.
    This article suggests that the enterprise of Mark Bevir's book , is the reverse of what his title implies. Bevir seeks not to delineate the peculiar logic of a specialised subfield of history called the ‘history of ideas’, but rather the logic which underlies historical pursuit considered in general as the ‘explanation of belief’. If this is so, then the relationship between belief, meaning, and speech act in intellectual texts, and the task and method of the intellectual historian, must (...)
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  44.  69
    Truth Approximation, Belief Merging, and Peer Disagreement.Gustavo Cevolani - 2014 - Synthese 191 (11):2383-2401.
    In this paper, we investigate the problem of truth approximation via belief merging, i.e., we ask whether, and under what conditions, a group of inquirers merging together their beliefs makes progress toward the truth about the underlying domain. We answer this question by proving some formal results on how belief merging operators perform with respect to the task of truth approximation, construed as increasing verisimilitude or truthlikeness. Our results shed new light on the issue of how rational (dis)agreement affects the (...)
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  45.  62
    Four Senses of 'Meaning' in the History of Ideas: Quentin Skinner's Theory of Historical Interpretation. Martinich - 2009 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 3 (3):225-245.
    At least four different senses of 'meaning' need to be kept separate when describing the proper way to do the history of ideas. The first sense, communicative meaning, relies on the communicative intentions of the author and is very close to H. P. Grice's 'nonnatural meaning'. The second sense, meaning as significance or importance, is close to Grice's "natural meaning," but I focus on a type that depends on human interests; in this sense, meaning as significance is always relative (...)
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  46.  55
    An Ontology of Ideas.Wesley D. Cray & Timothy Schroeder - 2015 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 1 (4):757-775.
    Philosophers often talk about and engage with ideas. Scientists, artists, and historians do, too. But what is an idea? In this paper, we first motivate the desire for an ontology of ideas before discussing what conditions a candidate ontology would have to satisfy to be minimally adequate. We then offer our own account of the ontology of ideas, and consider various strategies for specifying the underlying metaphysics of the account. We conclude with a discussion of potential future (...)
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  47. Spinoza’s Metaphysics of Thought: Parallelisms and the Multifaceted Structure of Ideas.Yitzhak Y. Melamed - 2013 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (3):636-683.
    In this paper, I suggest an outline of a new interpretation of core issues in Spinoza’s metaphysics and philosophy of mind. I argue for three major theses. (1) In the first part of the paper I show that the celebrated Spinozistic doctrine commonly termed “the doctrine of parallelism” is in fact a confusion of two separate and independent doctrines of parallelism. Hence, I argue that our current understanding of Spinoza’s metaphysics and philosophy of mind is fundamentally flawed. (2) The clarification (...)
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  48.  69
    Amos Morris-Reich and Dirk Rupnow, Eds. Ideas of ‘Race’ in the History of the Humanities. Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017. Pp. Xiii+337. $109.00 ; $85.00.Johannes Steizinger - forthcoming - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science.
  49. Descartes on the Material Falsity of Ideas.Richard W. Field - 1993 - Philosophical Review 102 (3):309-333.
    Descartes claims in the Third Meditation that ideas of sense might be materially false. While an accurate interpretation of this claim has the potential of providing some valuable insights into Descartes's theory of ideas in general and his understanding of the epistemic status of sensations in particular, the explanation Descartes provides of the material falsity of ideas is itself obscure and misleading, making accurate interpretation difficult. In this paper an interpretation of material falsity is offered which identifies (...)
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  50.  64
    John Sergeant’s Argument Against Descartes and The Way of Ideas.Richard Glauser - 1988 - The Monist 71 (4):585-595.
    It is unquestionably one of the last objections Descartes might have expected, that if ideas exist, external objects are unknowable. How indeed could he have foreseen such an objection? Did he not seek to establish through his metaphysics, in the Meditations, the certainty of the existence of bodies, as well as the reality of the scientific knowledge we claim to have of them? And this procedure had necessarily to presuppose the existence of ideas: first, in order to demonstrate (...)
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