55 found
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  1. Visual Agnosia: Disorders of Object Recognition and What They Tell Us About Normal Vision.Martha J. Farah - 1990 - MIT Press.
    Visual Agnosia is a comprehensive and up-to-date review of disorders of higher vision that relates these disorders to current conceptions of higher vision from cognitive science, illuminating both the neuropsychological disorders and the nature of normal visual object recognition.Brain damage can lead to selective problems with visual perception, including visual agnosia the inability to recognize objects even though elementary visual functions remain unimpaired. Such disorders are relatively rare, yet they provide a window onto how the normal brain might accomplish the (...)
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  2.  16
    Dissociated Overt and Covert Recognition as an Emergent Property of a Lesioned Neural Network.Martha J. Farah, Randall C. O'Reilly & Shaun P. Vecera - 1993 - Psychological Review 100 (4):571-588.
  3.  23
    Neuropsychological Inference with an Interactive Brain: A Critique of the “Locality” Assumption.Martha J. Farah - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (1):43-61.
    When cognitive neuropsychologists make inferences about the functional architecture of the normal mind from selective cognitive impairments they generally assume that the effects of brain damage are local, that is, that the nondamaged components of the architecture continue to function as they did before the damage. This assumption follows from the view that the components of the functional architecture are modular, in the sense of being informationally encapsulated. In this target article it is argued that this “locality” assumption is probably (...)
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  4.  80
    Socioeconomic Status and the Developing Brain.Daniel A. Hackman & Martha J. Farah - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (2):65.
  5.  14
    A Computational Model of Semantic Memory Impairment: Modality Specificity and Emergent Category Specificity.Martha J. Farah & James L. McClelland - 1991 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 120 (4):339-357.
  6. Personhood and Neuroscience: Naturalizing or Nihilating?Martha J. Farah & Andrea S. Heberlein - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):37-48.
    Personhood is a foundational concept in ethics, yet defining criteria have been elusive. In this article we summarize attempts to define personhood in psychological and neurological terms and conclude that none manage to be both specific and non-arbitrary. We propose that this is because the concept does not correspond to any real category of objects in the world. Rather, it is the product of an evolved brain system that develops innately and projects itself automatically and irrepressibly onto the world whenever (...)
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  7. Neuroethics: The Practical and the Philosophical.Martha J. Farah - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (1):34-40.
  8.  19
    What is "Special" About Face Perception?Martha J. Farah, Kevin D. Wilson, Maxwell Drain & James N. Tanaka - 1998 - Psychological Review 105 (3):482-498.
  9.  34
    The Neurological Basis of Mental Imagery: A Componential Analysis.Martha J. Farah - 1984 - Cognition 18 (1-3):245-272.
  10.  75
    Is Visual Imagery Really Visual: Some Overlooked Evidence From Neuropsychology.Martha J. Farah - 1988 - Psychological Review 95 (3):307-17.
  11.  13
    A Unified Account of Cognitive Impairments Following Frontal Lobe Damage: The Role of Working Memory in Complex, Organized Behavior.Daniel Y. Kimberg & Martha J. Farah - 1993 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 122 (4):411.
  12.  16
    Monitoring and Manipulating Brain Function: New Neuroscience Technologies and Their Ethical Implications.Martha J. Farah & Paul Root Wolpe - 2004 - Hastings Center Report 34 (3):35-45.
  13.  15
    Psychophysical Evidence for a Shared Representational Medium for Mental Images and Percepts.Martha J. Farah - 1985 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 114 (1):91-103.
  14. Neuroethics and the Problem of Other Minds: Implications of Neuroscience for the Moral Status of Brain-Damaged Patients and Nonhuman Animals. [REVIEW]Martha J. Farah - 2008 - Neuroethics 1 (1):9-18.
    Our ethical obligations to another being depend at least in part on that being’s capacity for a mental life. Our usual approach to inferring the mental state of another is to reason by analogy: If another being behaves as I do in a circumstance that engenders a certain mental state in me, I conclude that it has engendered the same mental state in him or her. Unfortunately, as philosophers have long noted, this analogy is fallible because behavior and mental states (...)
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  15.  32
    A Computational Analysis of Mental Image Generation: Evidence From Functional Dissociations in Split-Brain Patients.Stephen M. Kosslyn, Jeffrey D. Holtzman, Martha J. Farah & Michael S. Gazzaniga - 1985 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 114 (3):311-341.
  16. Neuroscience for Educators: What Are They Seeking, and What Are They Finding?Cayce J. Hook & Martha J. Farah - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (2):331-341.
    What can neuroscience offer to educators? Much of the debate has focused on whether basic research on the brain can translate into direct applications within the classroom. Accompanying ethical concern has centered on whether neuroeducation has made empty promises to educators. Relatively little investigation has been made into educators’ expectations regarding neuroscience research and how they might find it professionally useful. In order to address this question, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 13 educators who were repeat attendees of the Learning (...)
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  17.  15
    Reinterpreting Visual Patterns in Mental Imagery.Ronald A. Finks, Steven Pinker & Martha J. Farah - 1989 - Cognitive Science 13 (1):51-78.
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  18.  7
    Does Visual Attention Select Objects or Locations?Shaun P. Vecera & Martha J. Farah - 1994 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 123 (2):146-160.
  19.  57
    The Cognitive Neuroscience of Vision.Martha J. Farah - 2000 - Blackwell.
    The Cognitive Neuroscience of Vision begins by introducing the reader to the anatomy of the eye and visual cortex and then proceeds to discuss image and...
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  20.  24
    Visual Perception and Visual Awareness After Brain Damage: A Tutorial Overview.Martha J. Farah - 1994 - In Carlo Umilta & Morris Moscovitch (eds.), Consciousness and Unconscious Information Processing: Attention and Performance 15. MIT Press. pp. 203--236.
  21.  15
    Brain Images, Babies, and Bathwater:Critiquing Critiques of Functional Neuroimaging.Martha J. Farah - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (s2):S19-S30.
  22.  13
    Unconscious Perception of "Extinguished" Visual Stimuli: Reassessing the Evidence.Martha J. Farah, M. A. Monheit & M. A. Wallace - 1991 - Neuropsychologia 29:949-58.
  23.  8
    Electrophysiological Evidence for a Shared Representational Medium for Visual Images and Visual Percepts.Martha J. Farah, Franck Péronnet, Marie A. Gonon & Marie H. Giard - 1988 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 117 (3):248-257.
  24.  3
    Generating Visual Images: Units and Relations.Stephen M. Kosslyn, Brian J. Reiser, Martha J. Farah & Sharon L. Fliegel - 1983 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 112 (2):278-303.
  25.  23
    Neighborhood Disadvantage and Adolescent Stress Reactivity.Daniel A. Hackman, Laura M. Betancourt, Nancy L. Brodsky, Hallam Hurt & Martha J. Farah - 2012 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
  26.  13
    Mental Rotation and Orientation-Invariant Object Recognition: Dissociable Processes.Martha J. Farah & Katherine M. Hammond - 1988 - Cognition 29 (1):29-46.
  27.  2
    Functional MRI Evidence for an Abstract, Not Perceptual, Word-Form Area.Thad A. Polk & Martha J. Farah - 2002 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 131 (1):65-72.
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  28.  30
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on "Personhood and Neuroscience: Naturalizing or Nihilating?": Getting Personal.Martha J. Farah & Andrea S. Heberlein - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):1-4.
    Personhood is a foundational concept in ethics, yet defining criteria have been elusive. In this article we summarize attempts to define personhood in psychological and neurological terms and conclude that none manage to be both specific and non-arbitrary. We propose that this is because the concept does not correspond to any real category of objects in the world. Rather, it is the product of an evolved brain system that develops innately and projects itself automatically and irrepressibly onto the world whenever (...)
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  29.  9
    Structure and Strategy in Image Generation.Martha J. Farah & Stephen M. Kosslyn - 1981 - Cognitive Science 5 (4):371-383.
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  30.  52
    Consciousness of Perception After Brain Damage.Martha J. Farah & Todd E. Feinberg - 1997 - Seminars in Neurology 17:145-52.
  31.  27
    A Historical Perspective on Cognitive Neuroscience.Todd E. Feinberg & Martha J. Farah - 2000 - In Martha J. Farah & Todd E. Feinberg (eds.), Patient-Based Approaches to Cognitive Neuroscience. MIT Press. pp. 3--20.
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  32.  42
    Perception and Awareness After Brain Damage.Martha J. Farah - 1994 - Current Opinion in Neurobiology 4:252-55.
  33.  14
    Levels of Selection and Capacity Limits.Veronica J. Dark, William A. Johnston, Marina Myles-Worsley & Martha J. Farah - 1985 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 114 (4):472-497.
  34.  10
    Superadditive Effects of Multiple Lesions in a Connectionist Architecture: Implications for the Neuropsychology of Optic Aphasia.Mark Sitton, Michael C. Mozer & Martha J. Farah - 2000 - Psychological Review 107 (4):709-734.
  35.  28
    Reply to Jedlička: Neuroethics, Reductionism and Dualism.Martha J. Farah - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (4):173.
  36.  24
    Is Consciousness of Perception Really Separable From Perception?Martha J. Farah - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (2):254-255.
    Although not the main point of his target article, Block defends the view that perception and awareness of perception could be functions of different brain systems. I will argue that the available data do not support this view, and that Block's defense of the view rests on problematic eonstruals of the “executive system” and of the components of information-processing models.
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  37. Specialization Within Visual Object Recognition: Clues From Prosopagnosia and Alexia.Martha J. Farah - 1994 - In Martha J. Farah & G. Ratcliff (eds.), The Neuropsychology of High-Level Vision. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 133--146.
     
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  38.  4
    The Cognitive Neuroscience of the Self: Insights From Functional Neuroimaging of the Normal Brain.Seth J. Gillihan & Martha J. Farah - 2005 - In Todd E. Feinberg & Julian Paul Keenan (eds.), The Lost Self: Pathologies of the Brain and Identity. Oxford University Press. pp. 20--32.
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  39.  3
    Orientation Invariance and Geometric Primitives in Shape Recognition.Martha J. Farah, Robin Rochlin & Karen L. Klein - 1994 - Cognitive Science 18 (2):325-344.
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  40. Consciousness.Martha J. Farah - 2001 - In B. Rapp (ed.), The Handbook of Cognitive Neuropsychology: What Deficits Reveal About the Human Mind. Psychology Press/Taylor & Francis.
  41.  1
    Checking in with Neuroethics.Martha J. Farah - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (1):3-3.
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  42.  3
    Disorders Of.Martha J. Farah & Todd E. Feinberg - 2000 - In Martha J. Farah & Todd E. Feinberg (eds.), Patient-Based Approaches to Cognitive Neuroscience. MIT Press. pp. 143.
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  43. Disorders of Perception and Awareness.Martha J. Farah & Todd E. Feinberg - 2000 - In Martha J. Farah & Todd E. Feinberg (eds.), Patient-Based Approaches to Cognitive Neuroscience. MIT Press.
     
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  44.  11
    Interactions on the Interactive Brain.Martha J. Farah - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (1):90-104.
    When cognitive neuropsychologists make inferences about the functional architecture of the normal mind from selective cognitive impairments they generally assume that the effects of brain damage are local, that is, that the nondamaged components of the architecture continue to function as they did before the damage. This assumption follows from the view that the components of the functional architecture are modular, in the sense of being informationally encapsulated. In this target article it is argued that this “locality” assumption is probably (...)
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  45. Neuropsychological Inference with an Interactive Brain: A Critique of the “Locality” Assumption.Martha J. Farah - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (1):90-100.
    When cognitive neuropsychologists make inferences about the functional architecture of the normal mind from selective cognitive impairments they generally assume that the effects of brain damage are local, that is, that the nondamaged components of the architecture continue to function as they did before the damage. This assumption follows from the view that the components of the functional architecture are modular, in the sense of being informationally encapsulated. In this target article it is argued that this “locality” assumption is probably (...)
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  46.  5
    More Interactions on the Interactive Brain.Martha J. Farah - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (3):521-523.
    The central claim of my original target article was a modest one (that modularity does not always hold) but it was misinterpreted as a much stronger one (that modularity never holds). Further confusions arose from multiple valid usages of the term and the similarity of the terms and Despite the limited nature of the claim, I maintain that it poses a stubborn problem for neuropsychology, not to be dispelled by new empirical methods or a priori reasoning.
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  47. Patient-Based Approaches to Cognitive Neuroscience.Martha J. Farah & Todd E. Feinberg (eds.) - 2000 - MIT Press.
    The cognitive disorders that follow brain damage are an important source of insights into the neural bases of human thought. This work offers state-of-the-art reviews of the patient-based approach to central issues in cognitive neuroscience by leaders in the field.
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  48. Poverty, Privilege and Brain Development: Empirical Findings and Ethical Implications.Martha J. Farah, Kimberly G. Noble & Hallam Hurt - 2005 - In Judy Illes (ed.), Neuroethics: Defining the Issues in Theory, Practice, and Policy. Oxford University Press.
  49. Poverty, Privilege and the Developing Brain: Empirical Findings and Ethical Implications.Martha J. Farah, Kimberly G. Noble & Hurt & H. - 2005 - In Judy Illes (ed.), Neuroethics: Defining the Issues in Theory, Practice, and Policy. Oxford University Press.
  50.  5
    Semantic Memory.Martha J. Farah & Murray Grossman - 2000 - In Martha J. Farah & Todd E. Feinberg (eds.), Patient-Based Approaches to Cognitive Neuroscience. MIT Press. pp. 301.
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