37 found
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  1.  32
    An Integrated Theory of Language Production and Comprehension.Martin J. Pickering & Simon Garrod - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):329-347.
  2.  84
    Toward a Mechanistic Psychology of Dialogue.Martin J. Pickering & Simon Garrod - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (2):169-190.
    Traditional mechanistic accounts of language processing derive almost entirely from the study of monologue. Yet, the most natural and basic form of language use is dialogue. As a result, these accounts may only offer limited theories of the mechanisms that underlie language processing in general. We propose a mechanistic account of dialogue, the interactive alignment account, and use it to derive a number of predictions about basic language processes. The account assumes that, in dialogue, the linguistic representations employed by the (...)
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  3.  74
    Getting Ahead: Forward Models and Their Place in Cognitive Architecture.Martin J. Pickering & Andy Clark - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (9):451-456.
  4.  19
    Syntactic Co-Ordination in Dialogue.Holly P. Branigan, Martin J. Pickering & Alexandra A. Cleland - 2000 - Cognition 75 (2):B13-B25.
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  5.  36
    Do People Use Language Production to Make Predictions During Comprehension?Martin J. Pickering & Simon Garrod - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (3):105-110.
  6.  40
    Why is Conversation so Easy?Simon Garrod & Martin J. Pickering - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (1):8-11.
  7.  38
    Joint Action, Interactive Alignment, and Dialog.Simon Garrod & Martin J. Pickering - 2009 - Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (2):292-304.
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  8.  12
    The Influence of the Immediate Visual Context on Incremental Thematic Role-Assignment: Evidence From Eye-Movements in Depicted Events.Pia Knoeferle, Matthew W. Crocker, Christoph Scheepers & Martin J. Pickering - 2005 - Cognition 95 (1):95-127.
  9.  10
    Forward Models and Their Implications for Production, Comprehension, and Dialogue.Martin J. Pickering & Simon Garrod - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):377-392.
    Our target article proposed that language production and comprehension are interwoven, with speakers making predictions of their own utterances and comprehenders making predictions of other people's utterances at different linguistic levels. Here, we respond to comments about such issues as cognitive architecture and its neural basis, learning and development, monitoring, the nature of forward models, communicative intentions, and dialogue.
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  10.  84
    Syntactic Alignment and Participant Role in Dialogue.Holly P. Branigan, Martin J. Pickering, Janet F. McLean & Alexandra A. Cleland - 2007 - Cognition 104 (2):163-197.
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  11.  12
    Persistence of Emphasis in Language Production: A Cross-Linguistic Approach.Sarah Bernolet, Robert J. Hartsuiker & Martin J. Pickering - 2009 - Cognition 112 (2):300-317.
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  12.  1
    The Comprehension of Anomalous Sentences: Evidence From Structural Priming.Iva Ivanova, Martin J. Pickering, Holly P. Branigan, Janet F. McLean & Albert Costa - 2012 - Cognition 122 (2):193-209.
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  13.  6
    Reading Time Evidence for Enriched Composition.Brian McElree, Matthew J. Traxler, Martin J. Pickering, Rachel E. Seely & Ray Jackendoff - 2001 - Cognition 78 (1):B17-B25.
  14.  7
    It is There Whether You Hear It or Not: Syntactic Representation of Missing Arguments.Zhenguang G. Cai, Martin J. Pickering, Ruiming Wang & Holly P. Branigan - 2015 - Cognition 136:255-267.
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  15.  3
    The Role of Beliefs in Lexical Alignment: Evidence From Dialogs with Humans and Computers.Holly P. Branigan, Martin J. Pickering, Jamie Pearson, Janet F. McLean & Ash Brown - 2011 - Cognition 121 (1):41-57.
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  16.  6
    Deferred Interpretations: Why Starting Dickens is Taxing but Reading Dickens Isn't.Brian McElree, Steven Frisson & Martin J. Pickering - 2006 - Cognitive Science 30 (1):181-192.
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  17.  87
    Why Cognitive Science is Not Formalized Folk Psychology.Martin J. Pickering & Nick Chater - 1995 - Minds and Machines 5 (3):309-337.
    It is often assumed that cognitive science is built upon folk psychology, and that challenges to folk psychology are therefore challenges to cognitive science itself. We argue that, in practice, cognitive science and folk psychology treat entirely non-overlapping domains: cognitive science considers aspects of mental life which do not depend on general knowledge, whereas folk psychology considers aspects of mental life which do depend on general knowledge. We back up our argument on theoretical grounds, and also illustrate the separation between (...)
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  18.  80
    The Interactive-Alignment Model: Developments and Refinements.Martin J. Pickering & Simon Garrod - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (2):212-225.
    The interactive-alignment model of dialogue provides an account of dialogue at the level of explanation normally associated with cognitive psychology. We develop our claim that interlocutors align their mental models via priming at many levels of linguistic representation, explicate our notion of automaticity, defend the minimal role of “other modeling,” and discuss the relationship between monologue and dialogue. The account can be applied to social and developmental psychology, and would benefit from computational modeling.
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  19.  15
    Covariation and Quantifier Polarity: What Determines Causal Attribution in Vignettes?Asifa Majid, Anthony J. Sanford & Martin J. Pickering - 2006 - Cognition 99 (1):35-51.
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  20. Participant Role and Syntactic Alignment in Dialogue.Holly P. Branigan, Martin J. Pickering, Janet F. McLean & Alexandra A. Cleland - 2007 - Cognition 104:163-197.
     
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  21. Coercion in on-Line Semantic Processing.Brian McElree, Matthew J. Traxler, Martin J. Pickering, Ray S. Jackendoff & Rachel E. Seely - 2001 - Cognition 78:B17 - B25.
     
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  22.  46
    Linguistics Fit for Dialogue.Simon Garrod & Martin J. Pickering - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):678-678.
    Foundations of Language sets out to reconcile generative accounts of language structure with psychological accounts of language processing. We argue that Jackendoff's “parallel architecture” is a particularly appropriate linguistic framework for the interactive alignment account of dialogue processing. It offers a helpful definition of linguistic levels of representation, it gives an interesting account of routine expressions, and it supports radical incrementality in processing.
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  23.  32
    Shared Circuits in Language and Communication.Simon Garrod & Martin J. Pickering - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):26-27.
    The target article says surprisingly little about the possible role of shared circuits in language and communication. This commentary considers how they might contribute to linguistic communication, particularly during dialogue. We argue that shared circuits are used to promote alignment between linguistic representations at many levels and to support production-based emulation of linguistic input during comprehension.
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  24.  25
    A Common Framework for Language Comprehension and Language Production?Robert J. Hartsuiker & Martin J. Pickering - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):887-888.
    Natural language processing involves a tight coupling between action (the production of language) and perception (the comprehension of language). We argue that similar theoretical principles apply to language processing as to action/perception in general. Language production is not driven solely by the speaker's intentions; language comprehension is not only input-driven; production and perception use common representations. We will relate recent findings from our language production lab to the Theory of Event Coding (TEC)'s principle of feature binding.
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  25.  21
    Syntactic Representation in the Lemma Stratum.Holly P. Branigan & Martin J. Pickering - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (2):296-297.
    Levelt, Roelofs, & Meyer (henceforth Levelt et al. 1999) propose a model of production incorporating a lemma stratum, which is concerned with the syntactic characteristics of lexical entries. We suggest that syntactic priming experiments provide evidence about how such syntactic information is represented, and that this evidence can be used to extend Levelt et al.'s model. Evidence from syntactic priming experiments also supports Levelt et al.'s conjecture that the lemma stratum is shared between the production and comprehension systems.
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  26.  6
    Talking to Each Other and Talking Together: Joint Language Tasks and Degrees of Interactivity.Chiara Gambi & Martin J. Pickering - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):423-424.
    A second-person perspective in neuroscience is particularly appropriate for the study of communication. We describe how the investigation of joint language tasks can contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying interaction.
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  27.  14
    Relation Priming, the Lexical Boost, and Alignment in Dialogue.Claudine N. Raffray, Martin J. Pickering & Holly P. Branigan - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (4):394-395.
    The authors' claim that analogical reasoning is the product of relational priming is compatible with language processing work that emphasizes the role of low-level automatic processes in the alignment of situation models in dialogue. However, their model ignores recent behavioral evidence demonstrating a effect on relational priming. We discuss implications of these data.
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  28.  5
    From Language-Specific to Shared Syntactic Representations: The Influence of Second Language Proficiency on Syntactic Sharing in Bilinguals.Sarah Bernolet, Robert J. Hartsuiker & Martin J. Pickering - 2013 - Cognition 127 (3):287-306.
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  29.  8
    No Evidence for Traces in Sentence Comprehension.Martin J. Pickering - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):47-48.
    Grodzinsky claims that “normal language users demonstrate trace-antecedent relations in real-time tasks.” However, the cited evidence is equally compatible with a traceless account of processing. Moreover, Pickering and Barry (1991) and Traxler and Pickering (1996) have demonstrated that the processor does not wait until the purported trace location before forming the dependency. Grodzinsky's claims about Broca's area should be interpreted in terms of a transformation-free account.
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  30.  1
    Parsing.Martin J. Pickering - 2003 - In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.
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  31. Perspective Taking in Language: Integrating the Spatial and Action Domains.Madeleine E. L. Beveridge & Martin J. Pickering - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  32. Two Realms of Mental Life: The Non-Overlap of Belief Ascription and the Scientific Study of Mind and Behavior.Nick Chater & Martin J. Pickering - 2003 - Facta Philosophica 5 (2):335-353.
     
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  33. Do Bilinguals Automatically Activate Their Native Language When They Are Not Using It?Albert Costa, Mario Pannunzi, Gustavo Deco & Martin J. Pickering - 2016 - Cognitive Science 41 (4).
    Most models of lexical access assume that bilingual speakers activate their two languages even when they are in a context in which only one language is used. A critical piece of evidence used to support this notion is the observation that a given word automatically activates its translation equivalent in the other language. Here, we argue that these findings are compatible with a different account, in which bilinguals “carry over” the structure of their native language to the non-native language during (...)
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  34. Do Bilinguals Automatically Activate Their Native Language When They Are Not Using It?Albert Costa, Mario Pannunzi, Gustavo Deco & Martin J. Pickering - 2016 - Cognitive Science 41 (4).
    Most models of lexical access assume that bilingual speakers activate their two languages even when they are in a context in which only one language is used. A critical piece of evidence used to support this notion is the observation that a given word automatically activates its translation equivalent in the other language. Here, we argue that these findings are compatible with a different account, in which bilinguals “carry over” the structure of their native language to the non-native language during (...)
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  35. The Use of Content and Timing to Predict Turn Transitions.Simon Garrod & Martin J. Pickering - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  36. Concurrent Processing of Words and Their Replacements During Speech.Robert J. Hartsuiker, Ciara M. Catchpole, Nivja H. de Jong & Martin J. Pickering - 2008 - Cognition 108 (3):601-607.
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  37. Self-, Other-, and Joint Monitoring Using Forward Models.Martin J. Pickering & Simon Garrod - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.