8 found
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  1.  70
    What Does Society Owe Me If I Am Responsible for Being Worse Off?Martin Marchman Andersen - 2014 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (3):271-286.
    Luck egalitarians need to address the question of cost-responsibility: If an individual is responsible for being worse off than others, then what benefits, if any, is that individual uniquely cost-responsible for? By applying luck egalitarianism to justice in health I discuss different answers to this question inspired by two different interpretations of luck egalitarianism, namely ‘standard luck egalitarianism’ and ‘all luck egalitarianism’, respectively. Even though I argue that the latter is more plausible than the former, I ultimately suggest and defend (...)
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  2.  18
    Should We Hold the Obese Responsible?: Some Key Issues.Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen & Martin Marchman Andersen - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (4):443-451.
    It is a common belief that obesity is wholly or partially a question of personal choice and personal responsibility. It is also widely assumed that when individuals are responsible for some unfortunate state of affairs, society bears no burden to compensate them. This article focuses on two conceptualizations of responsibility: backward-looking and forward-looking conceptualizations. When ascertaining responsibility in a backward-looking sense, one has to determine how that state of affairs came into being or where the agent stood in relation to (...)
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  3.  56
    Luck Egalitarianism, Universal Health Care, and Non-Responsibility-Based Reasons for Responsibilization.Martin Marchman Andersen & Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen - 2015 - Res Publica 21 (2):201-216.
    In recent literature, there has been much debate about whether and how luck egalitarianism, given its focus on personal responsibility, can justify universal health care. In this paper we argue that, whether or not this is so, and in fact whether or not egalitarianism should be sensitive to responsibility at all, the question of personal responsibilization for health is not settled. This is the case because whether or not individuals are responsible for their own health condition is not all that (...)
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  4.  18
    Personal Responsibility and Lifestyle Diseases.Martin Marchman Andersen & Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (5):480-499.
    What does it take for an individual to be personally responsible for behaviors that lead to increased risk of disease? We examine three approaches to responsibility that cover the most important aspects of the discussion of responsibility and spell out what it takes, according to each of them, to be responsible for behaviors leading to increased risk of disease. We show that only what we call the causal approach can adequately accommodate widely shared intuitions to the effect that certain causal (...)
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  5.  27
    Symposium & Debate.David Alvarez, Axel Gosseries, Martin Marchman Andersen, Lasse Nielsen, David V. Axelsen, Daniel Weinstock & Shlomi Segall - 2012 - Ethical Perspectives 19 (2):277-334.
  6.  24
    What Does Morality Require When We Disagree?Martin Marchman Andersen - 2019 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 16 (1):27-49.
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  7. Reasonable Avoidability, Responsibility and Lifestyle Diseases.Martin Marchman Andersen - 2012 - Ethical Perspectives 19 (2).
  8.  7
    Bioethics in Denmark.Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen & Martin Marchman Andersen - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (3):326-333.
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