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  1.  9
    Reading Greek Prayers.Mary Depew - 1997 - Classical Antiquity 16 (2):229-261.
    Greek prayers are requests. As such they are speech acts marked off from everyday language by performance conditions on which their effectiveness depends. Inscribed Greek prayers, left in sanctuaries, provide information about these conditions. But inscribed prayers are more than memorials of an original act of praying. When read out loud, they were meant to re-enact and re-perform the prayer to which they refer. Inscriptional and other evidence suggests that eventually inscribed prayers were even meant to be read by the (...)
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  2.  8
    Callimachus' Book of Iambi (Book).Mary Depew - 2003 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 123:210-211.
  3.  28
    Callimachus' IAMBS B. Acosta-Hughes: Polyeideia. The Iambi of Callimachus and the Archaic Iambic Tradition . (Hellenistic Culture and Society 35.) Pp. Xv + 351. Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London: University of California Press, 2002. Cased, US$65, £45. ISBN: 0-520-22960-. [REVIEW]Mary Depew - 2005 - The Classical Review 55 (02):456-.
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  4.  14
    POxy 2509 and Callimachus' Lavacrum Palladis: Αγιόχοιο Διòς Κορη Μεγλοιο.Mary Depew - 1994 - Classical Quarterly 44 (02):410-.
    In his excellent commentary on Callimachus' fifth Hymn, A. W. Bulloch has discussed the many allusions to earlier literature out of which this poem is made. He has, however, missed one: an allusion to Hesiod's Catalogue, which, as I shall show here, not only sheds light on one of the poem's most puzzling scenes – Athena's consolatio to the nymph Chariclo – but also helps to explain the articulation and function of the poem's first, so-called ‘mimetic,’ section.
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  5.  8
    POxy 2509 and Callimachus' Lavacrum Palladis: Αἰγιόχοιο Διòς Κορη Μεγάλοιο.Mary Depew - 1994 - Classical Quarterly 44 (2):410-426.
    In his excellent commentary on Callimachus' fifth Hymn, A. W. Bulloch has discussed the many allusions to earlier literature out of which this poem is made. He has, however, missed one: an allusion to Hesiod's Catalogue, which, as I shall show here, not only sheds light on one of the poem's most puzzling scenes – Athena's consolatio to the nymph Chariclo – but also helps to explain the articulation and function of the poem's first, so-called ‘mimetic,’ section.
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  6.  5
    Seeing Double: Intercultural Poetics in Ptolemaic Alexandria (Review).Mary Depew - 2007 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 100 (2):167-168.