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  1.  90
    How are visuospatial working memory, executive functioning, and spatial abilities related? A latent-variable analysis.Akira Miyake, Naomi P. Friedman, David A. Rettinger, Priti Shah & Mary Hegarty - 2001 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 130 (4):621.
  2.  9
    The Cognitive Science of Visual‐Spatial Displays: Implications for Design.Mary Hegarty - 2011 - Cognitive Science.
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  3.  25
    Spatial Visualization in Physics Problem Solving.Maria Kozhevnikov, Michael A. Motes & Mary Hegarty - 2007 - Cognitive Science 31 (4):549-579.
    Three studies were conducted to examine the relation of spatial visualization to solving kinematics problems that involved either predicting the two‐dimensional motion of an object, translating from one frame of reference to another, or interpreting kinematics graphs. In Study 1, 60 physics‐naíve students were administered kinematics problems and spatial visualization ability tests. In Study 2, 17 (8 high‐ and 9 low‐spatial ability) additional students completed think‐aloud protocols while they solved the kinematics problems. In Study 3, the eye movements of fifteen (...)
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  4.  8
    The Neural Basis of Individual Differences in Directional Sense.Heather Burte, Benjamin O. Turner, Michael B. Miller & Mary Hegarty - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12:386011.
    Individuals differ greatly in their ability to learn and navigate through environments. One potential source of this variation is “directional sense” or the ability to identify, maintain, and compare allocentric headings. Allocentric headings are facing directions that are fixed to the external environment, such as cardinal directions. Measures of the ability to identify and compare allocentric headings, using photographs of familiar environments, have shown significant individual and strategy differences; however, the neural basis of these differences is unclear. Forty-five college students, (...)
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  5.  17
    Diagrams in the mind and in the world: Relations between internal and external visualizations.Mary Hegarty - 2004 - In A. Blackwell, K. Marriott & A. Shimojima (eds.), Diagrammatic Representation and Inference. Springer. pp. 1--13.
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  6. Decoupling of intuitions and performance in the use of complex visual displays.Mary Hegarty, Harvey S. Smallman & Andrew T. Stull - 2008 - In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. pp. 881--886.
  7.  15
    Understanding Differences in Wayfinding Strategies.Mary Hegarty, Chuanxiuyue He, Alexander P. Boone, Shuying Yu, Emily G. Jacobs & Elizabeth R. Chrastil - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (1):102-119.
    Navigating to goal locations in a known environment (wayfinding) can be accomplished by different strategies, notably by taking habitual, well-learned routes (response strategy) or by inferring novel paths, such as shortcuts, from spatial knowledge of the environment's layout (place strategy). Human and animal neuroscience studies reveal that these strategies reflect different brain systems, with response strategies relying more on activation of the striatum and place strategies associated with activation of the hippocampus. In addition to individual differences in strategy, recent behavioral (...)
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  8.  15
    Understanding Differences in Wayfinding Strategies.Mary Hegarty, Chuanxiuyue He, Alexander P. Boone, Shuying Yu, Emily G. Jacobs & Elizabeth R. Chrastil - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (1):102-119.
    Navigating to goal locations in a known environment (wayfinding) can be accomplished by different strategies, notably by taking habitual, well-learned routes (response strategy) or by inferring novel paths, such as shortcuts, from spatial knowledge of the environment's layout (place strategy). Human and animal neuroscience studies reveal that these strategies reflect different brain systems, with response strategies relying more on activation of the striatum and place strategies associated with activation of the hippocampus. In addition to individual differences in strategy, recent behavioral (...)
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  9.  33
    Spatial Reasoning With External Visualizations: What Matters Is What You See, Not Whether You Interact.Madeleine Keehner, Mary Hegarty, Cheryl Cohen, Peter Khooshabeh & Daniel R. Montello - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (7):1099-1132.
    Three experiments examined the effects of interactive visualizations and spatial abilities on a task requiring participants to infer and draw cross sections of a three‐dimensional (3D) object. The experiments manipulated whether participants could interactively control a virtual 3D visualization of the object while performing the task, and compared participants who were allowed interactive control of the visualization to those who were not allowed control. In Experiment 1, interactivity produced better performance than passive viewing, but the advantage of interactivity disappeared in (...)
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  10.  11
    Building a Cognitive Science of Human Variation: Individual Differences in Spatial Navigation.Nora S. Newcombe, Mary Hegarty & David Uttal - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (1):6-14.
    This issue assesses how human spatial navigation differs: within individuals across short‐term variations in mood or stress, and between individuals across variations in age, gender, education, culture, and physical environment.
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  11.  5
    The Changing Landscape of Doctoral Education in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics: PhD Students, Faculty Advisors, and Preferences for Varied Career Options.David K. Sherman, Lauren Ortosky, Suyi Leong, Christopher Kello & Mary Hegarty - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    The landscape of graduate science education is changing as efforts to diversify the professoriate have increased because academic faculty jobs at universities have grown scarce and more competitive. With this context as a backdrop, the present research examines the perceptions and career goals of advisors and advisees through surveys of PhD students and faculty mentors in science, technology, engineering, and math disciplines. Study 1 examined actual preferences and career goals of PhD students among three options: research careers, teaching careers, and (...)
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