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  1.  79
    Boycott Basics: Moral Guidelines for Corporate Decision Making.Mary Lyn Stoll - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (S1):3 - 10.
    When one addresses boycotts, the efforts of the Montgomery bus boycotts to end segregation likely come to mind. However, the moral merits of a boycott are not always so clearly determined and how a company reacts to a boycott can have long lasting repercussions for its public image. In this article, I will examine a number of boycotts including boycotts by the American Family Association of both Ford and Proctor & Gamble based on their advertising venue choices. In a politically (...)
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  2.  89
    Corporate Rights to Free Speech?Mary Lyn Stoll - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 58 (1-3):261-269.
    . Although the courts have ruled that companies are legal persons, they have not yet made clear the extent to which political free speech for corporations is limited by the strictures legitimately placed upon corporate commercial speech. I explore the question of whether or not companies can properly be said to have the right to civil free speech or whether corporate speech is always de facto commercial speech not subject to the same sorts of legal protections as is the right (...)
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  3.  19
    Corporate Political Speech and Moral Obligation.Mary Lyn Stoll - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (3):553-563.
    In the wake of Citizens United v. the Federal Elections Commission, more companies are spending heavily on political speech, but the moral implications of doing so are not clear. Few business ethicists have directly addressed the moral legitimacy of corporate political speech and the conditions under which it may be morally permissible. My goal here is to outline the moral hazards associated with engaging in corporate political speech. I argue that whether one takes a narrow Friedman-style shareholder primacy view of (...)
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  4.  33
    The Ethics of Marketing Good Corporate Conduct.Mary Lyn Stoll - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 41 (1-2):121 - 129.
    Companies that contribute to charitable organizations rightly hope that their philanthropic work will also be good for the bottom line. Marketers of good corporate conduct must be especially careful, however, to market such conduct in a morally acceptable fashion. Although marketers typically engage in mild deception or take artistic license when marketing goods and services, these sorts of practices are far more morally troublesome when used to market good corporate conduct. I argue that although mild deception is not substantially worrisome (...)
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  5.  58
    Infotainment and the Moral Obligations of the Multimedia Conglomerate.Mary Lyn Stoll - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 66 (2/3):253 - 260.
    When the Federal Communications Commission considered revamping its policies, many political activists argued that media conglomerates had failed to meet their duties to protect freedom of speech. Moveon's dispute with CBS over its proposed Superbowl advertisement and Michael Moore's quarrel over distribution of his documentary, Fahrenheit 911, are cases in point. In matters of pure entertainment, the public expect companies to avoid offensive programming. The press, on the other hand, may well be forced to offend some audience members in order (...)
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  6.  28
    Backlash Hits Business Ethics: Finding Effective Strategies for Communicating the Importance of Corporate Social Responsibility.Mary Lyn Stoll - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 78 (1-2):17-24.
    Recently, several articles have asserted that corporate social responsibility programs have gone too far and need to be reigned in. These critics have charged that corporate social responsibility is to be regarded with skepticism and that any changes in corporate accountability should be superficial at best. I will examine a␣number of these objections; I conclude that these critiques are largely ill founded, but that their increasing frequency in popular media is a cause for concern. I argue that these purported objections (...)
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  7.  10
    Boycotts.Mary Lyn Stoll - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  8.  5
    Fishing for a Sustainable Future.Mary Lyn Stoll - 2009 - Between the Species 13 (9):6.
    As the efficiency and reach of global fishing has grown, overfishing has unwittingly undermined the industry’s future while at the same time depriving poor people of a dietary staple. Several problems that most concern the critics of globalization come into play: undermining the power of governments to protect their environments and citizens, an economic system that robs the poor and future generations of basic necessities, and market developments that undercut long term economic and environmental stability. I examine how creative institutional (...)
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  9.  6
    Green Chemistry Meets Green Business: A Match Long Overdue. [REVIEW]Mary Lyn Stoll - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (S1):23-28.
    In May of 2009, the Stockholm Convention added nine chemicals to its list of banned or restricted chemicals. While some businesses may be tempted to see further limitations on chemical production of persistent organic pollutants as an inconvenient hindrance, I argue that business ought to see strengthened rules as an opportunity to improve efficiency and to become more competitive in the global market place both financially and ethically. By re-examining not only product design but also products purchased, every company can (...)
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