Results for 'Mary McNaughton Collins'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  9
    Medical Malpractice Implications of PSA Testing for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer.Mary McNaughton Collins, Floyd J. Fowler, Richard G. Roberts, Joseph E. Oesterling, George J. Annas & Michael J. Barry - 1997 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 25 (4):234-242.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Medical Malpractice Implications of PSA Testing for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer.Mary McNaughton Collins, Floyd J. Fowler, Richard G. Roberts, Joseph E. Oesterling, George J. Annas & Michael J. Barry - 1997 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 25 (4):234-242.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  5
    Growth Factors as Survival Factors: Regulation of Apoptosis.Mary K. L. Collins, Gordon R. Perkins, Gemma Rodriguez‐Tarduchy, Maria Angela Nieto & Abelardo López‐Rivas - 1994 - Bioessays 16 (2):133-138.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  4. Experimental Psychology.Mary Collins & James Drever - 1926 - Journal of Philosophical Studies 1 (3):394-394.
  5.  6
    General Experimental Psychology. By A. G. Bills. (London: Longmans, Green & Co. 1934. Pp. X + 620. Price 16s.).Mary Collins - 1936 - Philosophy 11 (44):493-.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  1
    Social Development in Young Children: A Study in Beginnings. By Susan Isaacs. (London: Routledge & Sons, 1933. Pp. Vii + 480. Price 15s.). [REVIEW]Mary Collins - 1934 - Philosophy 9 (34):250-.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  1
    Book Review Section 1. [REVIEW]Clinton Collins, Rita M. Bean, Richard A. Brosio, Diane M. Dunlap, Harvey H. Neufeldt, Joan K. Smith, Donald Arnstine, William Casement & Mary E. Henry - 1992 - Educational Studies 23 (1):18-69.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  14
    Antiquity and Humanity: Essays on Ancient Religion and Philosophy: Presented to Hans Dieter Betz on His 70th Birthday.Hans Dieter Betz, Adela Yarbro Collins & Margaret Mary Mitchell (eds.) - 2001 - Mohr Siebeck.
  9. James Drever, 1873-1950.Mary Collins - 1951 - Psychological Review 58 (1):1-4.
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. The Aerial Photo Sourcebook.Mary Rose Collins - 1998 - Scarecrow Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  9
    Naturalism And Normativity: Reply to McNaughton and Rawling.David McNaughton, Piers Rawling & Sabina Lovibond - 2004 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 104 (1):187-203.
    McNaughton and Rawling's anti-reductionist intentions are to be welcomed, but are not well served by their continuing adherence to a neo-Humean notion of the 'descriptive'. Their too-willing acceptance of this notion is reflected in a denial of appropriate dialectical weight to considerations about the way 'pattern' disappears from the domain of value when we try to characterize the constituent features of the latter in non-evaluative terms. The need for a satisfactory account of the immanence of value in nature is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. The Correspondence of Samuel Clarke and Anthony Collins, 1707-08.Samuel Clarke & Anthony Collins - 2011 - Broadview Press.
    An important work in the debate between materialists and dualists, the public correspondence between Anthony Collins and Samuel Clarke provided the framework for arguments over consciousness and personal identity in eighteenth-century Britain. In Clarke's view, mind and consciousness are so unified that they cannot be compounded into wholes or divided into parts, so mind and consciousness must be distinct from matter. Collins, by contrast, was a perceptive advocate of a materialist account of mind, who defended the possibility that (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Epistemological Chicken HM Collins and Steven Yearley.H. M. Collins - 1992 - In Andrew Pickering (ed.), Science as Practice and Culture. University of Chicago Press. pp. 301.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   18 citations  
  14.  5
    Journey Into Space HM Collins and Steven Yearley.H. M. Collins - 1992 - In Andrew Pickering (ed.), Science as Practice and Culture. University of Chicago Press. pp. 369.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15.  1
    I—David McNaughton and Piers Rawling: Descriptivism, Normativity and the Metaphysics of Reasons.David McNaughton & Piers Rawling - 2003 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 77 (1):23-45.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  1
    C. A. Campbell and the Problem of Suffering: John Collins.John Collins - 1980 - Religious Studies 16 (3):307-316.
    Although C. A. Campbell's account of the problem of suffering is articulated in the context of making out a case for rational Theism, it does not stand or fall with the case for rational Theism. It has independent merit as a sustained effort of reason to grapple with the problem of whether the goodness and omnipotence of God are consistent with the prima facie badness of so much of the suffering that exists in God's world. Campbell's views on suffering are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Determinism and Freewill: Anthony Collins' a Philosophical Inquiry Concerning Human Liberty: With a Discussion of the Opinions of Hobbes, Locke, Pierre Bayle, William King and Leibniz.Anthony Collins - 1976 - M. Nijhoff.
  18. History of Philosophy in the Making: A Symposium of Essays to Honor Professor James D. Collins on His 65th Birthday.James Daniel Collins & Linus J. Thro (eds.) - 1982 - University Press of America.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  17
    The "Other" in Second Temple Judaism: Essays in Honor of John J. Collins.John J. Collins & Daniel C. Harlow (eds.) - 2010 - W.B. Eerdmans Pub. Co..
    Based on a conference held Apr. 4-5, 2008 at Amherst College.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  8
    Experimental Psychology. By Mary Collins, M.A., B.Ed., Ph.D., Lecturer in Applied Psychology in the University of Edinburgh, and James Drever, M.A., B.Sc, D.Phil., F.R.S.E., Director of the George Combe Psychological Laboratory, University of Edinburgh. [REVIEW]T. H. Pear - 1926 - Philosophy 1 (3):394.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  5
    Hans Küng, Can We Save the Catholic Church!? London, William Collins, 2013, 345 Pp. An Open Letter to Pope Francis? Or ‘Sleepers Awake!’. [REVIEW]Patrick Hutchings - 2014 - Sophia 53 (3):401-410.
    Hans Küng is a well-known, and harsh, critic of doctrine of papal infallibility declared at Vatican I, 1870–1871. It leads—he argues—not to transparent certainty, but away from it. A propos ‘infallibility’ and the still-running scandals of child sexual abuse by members of the Catholic clergy, he writes:…While Rome no longer dares to proclaim formally infallible doctrines, it still envelopes all of its doctrinal pronouncements with an aura of infallibility, as though the Pope’s words were a direct expression of God’s will (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Custom Freedom and Equality: Mary Astell on Marriage and Women's Education.Karen Detlefsen - 2016 - In Penny Weiss & Alice Sowaal (eds.), Feminist Interpretations of Mary Astell. Pennsylvania State University Press. pp. 74-92.
    Whatever may be said about contemporary feminists’ evaluation of Descartes’ role in the history of feminism, Mary Astell herself believed that Descartes’ philosophy held tremendous promise for women. His urging all people to eschew the tyranny of custom and authority in order to uncover the knowledge that could be found in each one of our unsexed souls potentially offered women a great deal of intellectual and personal freedom and power. Certainly Astell often read Descartes in this way, and Astell (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Mary Shepherd and the Causal Relation - Part One.Jennifer McRobert - manuscript
    Mary Shepherd and the Causal Relation - Part One -/- Part One gives context to the life and work of Lady Mary Shepherd. It weaves together the stories of her ancestors, her own stories and the wider social, historical and philosophical context. The aim is to evoke a world from which to mark the emergence of Mary Shepherd, Scotland’s first female philosopher.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  30
    Mary and the Two Gods: Trying Out an Ability Hypothesis.Hongwoo Kwon - 2017 - Philosophical Review 126 (2):191-217.
    There are close parallels between Frank Jackson's case of black-and-white Mary and David Lewis's case of the two omniscient gods. This essay develops and defends what may be called “the ability hypothesis” about the knowledge that the gods lack, by adapting Lewis's ability hypothesis about the knowledge that Mary acquires. What the gods might lack despite their propositional omniscience is not any distinctive kind of information, but certain abilities of introspection. The motivating idea is that knowledge one acquires (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  38
    Cartesianism and its Feminist Promise and Limits: The Case of Mary Astell.Karen Detlefsen - forthcoming - In Catherine Wilson & Stephen Gaukroger (eds.), Mind and Nature in Descartes and Cartesianism. Oxford University Press.
    In this paper, I consider Mary Astell's contributions to the history of feminism, noting her grounding in and departure from Cartesianism and its relation to women.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  80
    Mary Astell on Virtuous Friendship.Jacqueline Broad - 2009 - Parergon: Journal of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies 26 (2):65-86.
    According to some scholars, Mary Astell’s feminist programme is severely limited by its focus on self-improvement rather than wider social change. In response, I highlight the role of ‘virtuous friendship’ in Astell’s 1694 work, A Serious Proposal to the Ladies. Building on classical ideals and traditional Christian principles, Astell promotes the morally transformative power of virtuous friendship among women. By examining the significance of such friendship to Astell’s feminism, we can see that she did in fact aim to bring (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  27.  22
    A Vindication of Political Virtue: The Political Theory of Mary Wollstonecraft.Virginia Sapiro - 1992 - University of Chicago Press.
    Nearly two hundred years ago, Mary Wollstonecraft wrote what is considered to be the first major work of feminist political theory: A Vindication of the Rights of Women . Much has been written about this work, and about Wollstonecraft as the intellectual pioneer of feminism, but the actual substance and coherence of her political thought have been virtually ignored. Virginia Sapiro here provides the first full-length treatment of Wollstonecraft's political theory. Drawing on all of Wollstonecraft's works and treating them (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  28. Symbol Systems as Collective Representational Resources: Mary Hesse, Nelson Goodman, and the Problem of Scientific Representation.Axel Gelfert - 2015 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 4 (6):52-61.
    This short paper grew out of an observation—made in the course of a larger research project—of a surprising convergence between, on the one hand, certain themes in the work of Mary Hesse and Nelson Goodman in the 1950/60s and, on the other hand, recent work on the representational resources of science, in particular regarding model-based representation. The convergence between these more recent accounts of representation in science and the earlier proposals by Hesse and Goodman consists in the recognition that, (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  70
    Mary Astell on Marriage and Lockean Slavery.Jacqueline Broad - 2014 - History of Political Thought 35 (4):717–38.
    In the 1706 third edition of her Reflections upon Marriage, Mary Astell alludes to John Locke’s definition of slavery in her descriptions of marriage. She describes the state of married women as being ‘subject to the inconstant, uncertain, unknown, Arbitrary Will of another Man’ (Locke, Two Treatises, II.22). Recent scholars maintain that Astell does not seriously regard marriage as a form of slavery in the Lockean sense. In this paper, I defend the contrary position: I argue that Astell does (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  61
    “Determinism/Spinozism in the Radical Enlightenment: The Cases of Anthony Collins and Denis Diderot”.Charles T. Wolfe - 2007 - International Review of Eighteenth-Century Studies 1 (1):37-51.
    In his Philosophical Inquiry concerning Human Liberty (1717), the English deist Anthony Collins proposed a complete determinist account of the human mind and action, partly inspired by his mentor Locke, but also by elements from Bayle, Leibniz and other Continental sources. It is a determinism which does not neglect the question of the specific status of the mind but rather seeks to provide a causal account of mental activity and volition in particular; it is a ‘volitional determinism’. Some decades (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  31.  20
    When is a Contract Theorist Not a Contract Theorist? Mary Astell and Catharine Macaulay as Critics of Thomas Hobbes.Karen Green - 2012 - In Nancy Hirschmann Joanne Wright (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Thomas Hobbes. Penn State. pp. 169-89.
    Although Catharine Macaulay was a contract theorist and early feminist her philosophy is not based on a concept of liberty like that of Hobbes, but on a notion of individual liberty as self government close to that accepted by Mary Astell. This raises the question of whether criticisms of liberal feminism which assume that it is rooted in Hobbes's suspect notion of freedom and consent may miss there mark.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  32. The Achilles Argument and the Nature of Matter in the Clarke-Collins Correspondenc.Marleen Rozemond - 2008 - In Tom Lennon & Robert Stainton (eds.), The Achilles of Rational Psychology.
    The Clarke-Collins correspondence was widely read and frequently printed during the 18th century. Its central topic is the question whether matter can think, or be conscious. Samuel Clarke defends the immateriality of the subject of the mental against Anthony Collins’ materialism. This paper examines important assumptions about the nature of body that play a role in their debate. Clarke argued that consciousness requires an “individual being”, an entity with some sort of significant unity as its subject. They agree (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  33. Mary Shepherd on Causal Necessity.Jeremy Fantl - 2016 - Metaphysica 17.
    Lady Mary Shepherd’s critique of Hume’s account of causation, his worries about knowledge of matters of fact, and the contention that it is possible for the course of nature to spontaneously change relies primarily on three premises, two of which – that objects are merely bundles of qualities and that the qualities of an object are individuated by the causal powers contributed by those qualities – anticipate contemporary metaphysical views in ways that she should be getting credit for. The (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  85
    Back to the Future: Marriage as Friendship in the Thought of Mary Wollstonecraft.Ruth Abbey - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (3):78-95.
    : If liberal theory is to move forward, it must take the political nature of family relations seriously. The beginnings of such a liberalism appear in Mary Wollstonecraft's work. Wollstonecraft's depiction of the family as a fundamentally political institution extends liberal values into the private sphere by promoting the ideal of marriage as friendship. However, while her model of marriage diminishes arbitrary power in family relations, she seems unable to incorporate enduring sexual relations between married partners.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  35.  66
    A Critique of Mary Anne Warren's Weak Animal Rights View.Aaron Simmons - 2007 - Environmental Ethics 29 (3):267-278.
    In her book, Moral Status, Mary Anne Warren defends a comprehensive theory of the moral status of various entities. Under this theory, she argues that animals may have some moral rights but that their rights are much weaker in strength than the rights of humans, who have rights in the fullest, strongest sense. Subsequently, Warren believes that our duties to animals are far weaker than our duties to other humans. This weakness is especially evident from the fact that Warren (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  16
    Moral Evaluations of Organ Transplantation Influence Judgments of Death and Causation.Michael Nair-Collins & Mary A. Gerend - 2015 - Neuroethics 8 (3):283-297.
    Two experiments investigated whether moral evaluations of organ transplantation influence judgments of death and causation. Participants’ beliefs about whether an unconscious organ donor was dead and whether organ removal caused death in a hypothetical vignette varied depending on the moral valence of the vignette. Those who were randomly assigned to the good condition were more likely to believe that the donor was dead prior to organ removal and that organ removal did not cause death. Furthermore, attitudes toward euthanasia and organ (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Feminist Interpretations of Mary Wollstonecraft.Maria J. Falco (ed.) - 1995 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Combining the liberalism of Locke and the "civic humanism" of Republicanism, Mary Wollstonecraft explored the need of women for coed and equal education with men, economic independence whether married or not, and representation as citizens in the halls of government. In doing so, she foreshadowed and surpassed her much better known successor, John Stuart Mill. Ten feminist scholars prominent in the fields of political philosophy, constitutional and international law, rhetoric, literature, and psychology argue here that Wollstonecraft, by reason of (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38.  17
    The Public Life of a Woman of Wit and Quality: Lady Mary Wortley Montagu and the Vogue for Smallpox Inoculation.Diana Barnes - 2012 - Feminist Studies 38 (2):330-62.

    During a smallpox epidemic in April 1721, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu asked Dr. Charles Maitland to "engraft" her daughter, thus instigating the first documented inoculation for smallpox (_Variola_ virus) in England. Engrafting, or variolation, was a means of conferring immunity to smallpox by placing pus taken from a smallpox pustule under the skin of an uninfected person to create a local infection. The introduction of infectious viral matter, however, could trigger fullblown smallpox, and the practice was controversial for both (...)

    Montagu’s pioneering role in the smallpox debate is undoubtedly significant: she instigated the first smallpox inoculation on English soil, and she was largely responsible for making the practice acceptable in elite circles. My interest in this essay is in the nature and significance of Montagu’s reputation as an inoculation pioneer. I will argue that her reputation was based on the particular combination of her social position as a Whig and an aristocratic woman; her interest in progressive and enlightened forms of social, political, and scientific thought; her standing in influential literary circles; and, not least, the force of her own personality. In broad terms, I offer Montagu’s involvement in the smallpox debate as a case study in a new kind of public role becoming available to elite women in the early eighteenth century — a role that caused considerable discomfort among her peers and in the medical community, and one that stimulated a widespread controversy in print publications of the day. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  32
    The Metaphorical Conception of Scientific Explanation: Rereading Mary Hesse. [REVIEW]Maria Rentetzi - 2005 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 36 (2):377 - 391.
    In 1997, five decades after the publication of the landmark Hempel-Oppenheim article "Studies in the Logic of Explanation"([1948], 1970) Wesley Salmon published Causality and Explanation, a book that re-addresses the issue of scientific explanation. He provided an overview of the basic approaches to scientific explanation, stressed their weaknesses, and offered novel insights. However, he failed to mention Mary Hesse's approach to the topic and analyze her standpoint. This essay brings front and center Hesse's approach to scientific explanation formulated in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  38
    Collins's Incorrect Depiction of Dreyfus's Critique of Artificial Intelligence.Evan Selinger - 2008 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (2):301-308.
    Harry Collins interprets Hubert Dreyfus’s philosophy of embodiment as a criticism of all possible forms of artificial intelligence. I argue that this characterization is inaccurate and predicated upon a misunderstanding of the relevance of phenomenology for empirical scientific research.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  17
    The Intimate Relationship Between the McNaughton and the Chinese Remainder Theorems for MV-Algebras.Eduardo J. Dubuc & Yuri Poveda - 2013 - Studia Logica 101 (3):483-485.
    We show the intimate relationship between McNaughton Theorem and the Chinese Remaindner Theorem for MV-algebras. We develop a very short and simple proof of McNaughton Theorem. The arguing is elementary and right out of the definitions. We exhibit the theorem as just an instance of the Chinese theorem. Since the variety of MV-algebras is arithmetic, the Chinese theorem holds for MV-algebras. However, to make this paper self-contained and entirely elementary, we include a simple proof of this theorem inspired (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  8
    Dr Mary Louisa Gordon : A Feminist Approach in Prison. [REVIEW]Deborah Cheney - 2010 - Feminist Legal Studies 18 (2):115-136.
    This article discusses the work of Dr Mary Louisa Gordon, who was appointed as the first English Lady Inspector of Prisons in 1908, and remained in post until 1921. Her attitude towards and treatment of women prisoners, as explained in her 1922 book Penal Discipline, stands in sharp contrast to that of her male contemporaries, and the categorisation of her approach as ‘feminist’ is reinforced by her documented connections with the suffragette movement. Yet her feminist and suffragist associations also (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  4
    A Hormonal Interpretation of Collins's Micro‐Sociological Theory of Violence.Allan Mazur - 2009 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 39 (4):434-447.
    Collins provides a grand theory that unifies all forms of human violence occurring in face-to-face situations, ranging from spousal abuse to medieval warfare. Laitin appreciates Collins's microscopic analysis of diverse data but points to important shortcomings in the theory, especially Collins's metaphoric explanations that are not testable. Here Collins's theory is merged with an existing biosocial model of dominance, replacing the metaphors with tangible, measurable hormonal mechanisms.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  3
    The Mysterious Mr. Collins: Living for 140 Years in "Origin of Species". [REVIEW]Mariko Ogawa - 2001 - Journal of the History of Biology 34 (3):461-479.
    In "Origin of Species," the object of intense research for nearly a century and a half, Charles Darwin refers to a "Mr. Collins" as if he were a famous cattle breeder. In fact, there is no mention of a famous cattle breeder called Collins anywhere else in the literature, although there is a suitable candidate for this description by the name of "Colling." Darwin's reference to Mr. Collins is probably an error. This paper will attempt to establish (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  1
    The Metaphorical Conception of Scientific Explanation: Rereading Mary Hesse.Maria Rentetzi - 2005 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 36 (2):377-391.
    In 1997, five decades after the publication of the landmark Hempel-Oppenheim article "Studies in the Logic of Explanation" Wesley Salmon published Causality and Explanation, a book that re-addresses the issue of scientific explanation. He provided an overview of the basic approaches to scientific explanation, stressed their weaknesses, and offered novel insights. However, he failed to mention Mary Hesse's approach to the topic and analyze her standpoint. This essay brings front and center Hesse's approach to scientific explanation formulated in the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  16
    The Philosophy of Mary Astell: An Early Modern Theory of Virtue.Jacqueline Broad - 2015 - Oxford University Press.
    Mary Astell is best known today as one of the earliest English feminists. This book sheds new light on her writings by interpreting her first and foremost as a moral philosopher—as someone committed to providing guidance on how best to live. The central claim of this work is that all the different strands of Astell’s thought—her epistemology, her metaphysics, her philosophy of the passions, her feminist vision, and her conservative political views—are best understood in light of her ethical objectives. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Mary Wollstonecraft, Public Reason and the Virtuous Republic.Alan M. S. J. Coffee - 2016 - In Sandrine Berges & Alan Coffee (eds.), The Social and Political philosophy of Mary Wollstonecraft. Oxford University Press. pp. 183-200.
    Although ‘virtue’ is a complex idea in Wollstonecraft’s work, one of its senses refers to the capacity and willingness to govern one’s own conduct rationally, and to employ this ability in deliberating about matters of public concern. Wollstonecraft understands virtue to be integral to the meaning of freedom rather than as merely instrumentally useful for its preservation. It follows, therefore, that a free republic must be a virtuous one. The first virtue of social institutions, we might say, is ‘virtue’ itself. (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Dial P for Philosophy (Review of Mary Midgley's Utopias, Dolphins and Computers.). [REVIEW]Ray Scott Percival - 1997 - New Scientist (2066).
    Mary Midgley's book Utopias, Dolphins and Computers will be needed to recharge our more philosophical approach to life as new problems present themselves to humanity at an accelerated rate. The most dangerous attitude to these challenges, Midgley argues, is an anti-intellectualism that fails to see that all approaches presuppose tacit or hidden assumptions, that is a philosophy. One part of our tacit philosophy that is now breaking up is the social contract, according to Mary Midgley in Utopias, Dolphins (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Philosophical Works of Lady Mary Shepherd.Mary Shepherd & Jennifer Mcrobert - 2000
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Mary Warnock a Memoir : People & Places.Mary Warnock - 2002
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000