Results for 'Mary S. Thibodeaux'

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  1.  10
    Differences in Value Systems of Anglo-American and Far Eastern Students: Effects of American Business Education. [REVIEW]Kamalesh Kumar & Mary S. Thibodeaux - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (3):253-262.
    This study examined differences in the values patterns of business students from Anglo-American and Far Eastern country clusters using Allport et al.'s (1970) Study of Values. Differences were noted on five of the six attitudes; Theoretical, Economic, Political, Social, and Religious. Next, using multiple comparison method the value patterns of newly arrived Far Eastern students and Far Eastern students who had spent considerable time in the U.S. were compared for changes in value patterns that may be attributable to their stay (...)
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  2.  25
    Institutionalization of Ethics: The Perspective of Managers. [REVIEW]Anita Jose & Mary S. Thibodeaux - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 22 (2):133 - 143.
    Corporate America is institutionalizing ethics through a variety of structures, systems, and processes. This study sought to identify managerial perceptions regarding the institutionalization of ethics in organizations. Eighty-six corporate level marketing and human resource managers of American multi-national corporations responded to a mail survey regarding the various implicit and explicit ways by which corporations institutionalize ethics. The results revealed that managers found ethics to be good for the bottom line of the organizations, they did not perceive the need for additional (...)
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  3.  3
    A Defence of Wiredu's Project of Conceptual Decolonisation.Carman Mary - 2016 - South African Journal of Philosophy 35 (2):235-248.
    Calls to decolonise the university and revise what we research and teach is a challenge that ought to be taken up by those working in African philosophy and philosophy in Africa, more generally. Often, the thought is that such decolonisation will involve a complete subversion, destruction or deconstruction of colonial attitudes, processes and concepts. A more moderate proposal for decolonisation of philosophy can be found, however, which is Kwasi Wiredu’s project of conceptual decolonisation. In this paper, I defend the project (...)
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  4.  7
    Editorial 1 Knowing One's Own Actions George Wilson/Proximal Practical Foresight 3–19 Kevin Falvey/Knowledge in Intention 21–44 Nomy Arpaly/Hamlet and the Utilitarians 45–57. [REVIEW]George Graham, Terence Horgan, Mary Mary & Quite Contrary - 2000 - Philosophical Studies 99:373-374.
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  5. Mary's Scientific Knowledge.Luca Malatesti - 2008 - Prolegomena 7 (1):37-59.
    Frank Jackson’s knowledge argument (KA) aims to prove, by means of a thought experiment concerning the hypothetical scientist Mary, that conscious experiences have non-physical properties, called qualia. Mary has complete scientific knowledge of colours and colour vision without having had any colour experience. The central intuition in the KA is that, by seeing colours, Mary will learn what it is like to have colour experiences. Therefore, her scientific knowledge is incomplete, and conscious experiences have qualia. In this (...)
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  6. Phenomenal Concepts, Color Experience, and Mary's Puzzle.Diana I. Pérez - 2011 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy (3):113-133.
    The aim of this paper is to analyze the relationship between phenomenal experience and our folk conceptualization of it. I will focus on the phenomenal concept strategy as an answer to Mary's puzzle. In the first part I present Mary's argument and the phenomenal concept strategy. In the second part I explain the requirements phenomenal concepts should satisfy in order to solve Mary's puzzle. In the third part I present various accounts of what a phenomenal concept is, (...)
     
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  7.  67
    What Mary's Aboutness Is About.Martina Fürst - 2011 - Acta Analytica 26 (1):63-74.
    The aim of this paper is to reinforce anti-physicalism by extending the hard problem to a specific kind of intentional states. For reaching this target, I investigate the mental content of the new intentional states of Jackson’s Mary. I proceed in the following way: I start analyzing the knowledge argument, which highlights the hard problem tied to phenomenal consciousness. In a second step, I investigate a powerful physicalist reply to this argument: the phenomenal concept strategy. In a third step, (...)
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  8. Mary’s Swollen Womb.Norm Klassen - 2016 - Renascence 68 (2):77-92.
    Through the juxtaposition of an image of Christ in Mary’s womb with that of Almachius as a bladder full of hot air, The Second Nun’s Prologue and Tale contributes to the theme in The Canterbury Tales of overcoming tyranny. While the nun’s tale alone presents an overly forceful apologetic, the image that Chaucer includes in her prologue subtly reminds audiences of a more paradoxical relationship between creator and creatures than that of either tyrant-and-subjects or tale-teller-and-audience-to-be-indoctrinated. Chaucer, if not so (...)
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  9.  26
    Mary's Wollstonecraft's Conception of Rights.James Susan - 2016 - In .
    Mary Wollstonecraft is celebrated for her Vindication of the Rights of Woman. However, while her title suggests that rights must play an important part in improving women’s situation, it is less clear how she envisages them. What does she think rights are and how are they to transform women’s lives? I argue that Wollstonecraft blends two traditions, a republican conception of rights as powers to act, and a distinct conception of natural rights. She offers a radical development of republican (...)
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  10. Custom Freedom and Equality: Mary Astell on Marriage and Women's Education.Karen Detlefsen - 2016 - In Penny Weiss & Alice Sowaal (eds.), Feminist Interpretations of Mary Astell. Pennsylvania State University Press. pp. 74-92.
    Whatever may be said about contemporary feminists’ evaluation of Descartes’ role in the history of feminism, Mary Astell herself believed that Descartes’ philosophy held tremendous promise for women. His urging all people to eschew the tyranny of custom and authority in order to uncover the knowledge that could be found in each one of our unsexed souls potentially offered women a great deal of intellectual and personal freedom and power. Certainly Astell often read Descartes in this way, and Astell (...)
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  11.  80
    A Critique of Mary Anne Warren's Weak Animal Rights View.Aaron Simmons - 2007 - Environmental Ethics 29 (3):267-278.
    In her book, Moral Status, Mary Anne Warren defends a comprehensive theory of the moral status of various entities. Under this theory, she argues that animals may have some moral rights but that their rights are much weaker in strength than the rights of humans, who have rights in the fullest, strongest sense. Subsequently, Warren believes that our duties to animals are far weaker than our duties to other humans. This weakness is especially evident from the fact that Warren (...)
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  12. Dial P for Philosophy (Review of Mary Midgley's Utopias, Dolphins and Computers.). [REVIEW]Ray Scott Percival - 1997 - New Scientist (2066).
    Mary Midgley's book Utopias, Dolphins and Computers will be needed to recharge our more philosophical approach to life as new problems present themselves to humanity at an accelerated rate. The most dangerous attitude to these challenges, Midgley argues, is an anti-intellectualism that fails to see that all approaches presuppose tacit or hidden assumptions, that is a philosophy. One part of our tacit philosophy that is now breaking up is the social contract, according to Mary Midgley in Utopias, Dolphins (...)
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  13. Introduction to There's Something About Mary.Daniel Stoljar & Yujin Nagasawa - 2003 - In Peter Ludlow, Daniel Stoljar & Yujin Nagasawa (eds.), There's Something About Mary.
    Mary is confined to a black-and-white room, is educated through black-and-white books and through lectures relayed on black-and white television. In this way she learns everything there is to know about the physical nature of the world. She knows all the physical facts about us and our environment, in a wide sense of 'physical' which includes everything in completed physics, chemistry, and neurophysiology, and all there is to know about the causal and relational facts consequent upon all this, including (...)
     
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  14. Swamp Mary's Revenge: Deviant Phenomenal Knowledge and Physicalism.Pete Mandik - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 148 (2):231 - 247.
    Deviant phenomenal knowledge is knowing what it's like to have experiences of, e. g., red without actually having had experiences of red. Such a knower is a deviant. Some physicalists have argued and some anti-physicalists have denied that the possibility of deviants undermines anti-physicalism and the Knowledge Argument. The current paper presents new arguments defending the deviant-based attacks on anti-physicalism. Central to my arguments are considerations concerning the psychosemantic underpinnings of deviant phenomenal knowledge. I argue that physicalists are in a (...)
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  15.  31
    Can Mary's Qualia Be Epiphenomenal?Lim Daniel & Wang Hao - 2014 - Res Philosophica 91 (3):503-512.
    Frank Jackson (1982) famously argued, with his so-called Knowledge Argument (KA), that qualia are non-physical. Moreover, he argued that qualia are epiphenomenal. Some have objected that epiphenomenalism is inconsistent with the soundness of KA. One way of developing this objection, following Neil Campbell (2003; 2012), is to argue that epiphenomenalism is at odds with the kind of behavioral evidence that makes the soundness of KA plausible. We argue that Campbell’s claim that epiphenomenalism is inconsistent with the soundness of KA is (...)
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  16. Mary's New Perspective.Torin Alter - 1995 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (4):585-84.
    I wish to consider an objection to Frank Jackson's knowledge argument recently made by Derk Pereboom.
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  17.  14
    “Like a Fanciful Kind of Half Being”: Mary Wollstonecraft's Criticism of Jean‐Jacques Rousseau.Martina Reuter - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (4):925-941.
    The article investigates the philosophical foundations and details of Mary Wollstonecraft's criticism of Jean-Jacques Rousseau's views on the education and nature of women. I argue that Wollstonecraft's criticism must not be understood as a constructionist critique of biological reductionism. The first section analyzes the differences between Wollstonecraft's and Rousseau's views on the possibility of a true civilization and shows how these differences connect to their respective conceptions of moral psychology. The section shows that Wollstonecraft's disagreement with Rousseau's views on (...)
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  18.  14
    Some Similarities Between Queen Mary's Psalter and the Northern Passion.O. S. Pickering - 1972 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 35:135-144.
  19.  4
    'God so Loved the World, That He Was Born of a Woman': Mary's Place in God's Loving of His Creation.Birute Arendarcikas - 2014 - Australasian Catholic Record, The 91 (2):194.
    Arendarcikas, Birute Since the Second Vatican Council and the historic embrace of Paul VI and the Patriarch of Constantinople Athenagoras I in January 1964, the pope and the hierarchs of the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Churches have, after centuries of mutual separation, embraced each other once again as sister churches. On many occasions the pope and the hierarchs of the respective churches have drawn attention to the loving veneration of, and special devotion to, Mary, the Mother of God, (...)
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  20. Denying Mary's Real Presence in Apparitions and Icons: Divine Impersonation in the Tenth-Century Life of Constantine the Ex-Jew.Dirk Krausmüller - 2008 - Byzantion 78:288-303.
    L'auteur s'intéresse à la Vie de Constantin le Juif et plus particulièrement à un phénomène qui avait échappé jusqu'alors à ses commentateurs: celui de "l'imitation divine" . Quand Constantin est sauvé d'un meurtre par une apparition de la Vierge, l'auteur de la Vie affirme qu'il ne s'agit pas de Marie elle-même, mais d'une grâce divine qui a pris son apparence. Ce concept se retrouve dans différentes vies de saints. Selon l'auteur, ce procédé semble vouloir rappeler au lecteur que l'influence de (...)
     
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  21.  23
    Strangers and Orphans: Knowledge and Mutuality in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.Claudia Rozas Gómez - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (4):360-370.
    Paulo Freire consistently upheld humanization and mutuality as educational ideals. This article argues that conceptualizations of knowledge and how knowledge is sought and produced play a role in fostering humanization and mutuality in educational contexts. Drawing on Mary Shelley?s novel Frankenstein, this article focuses on the two central characters who ?ardently? pursue knowledge at all costs. It will be argued that the text suggests two possible outcomes from the pursuit of knowledge. One is mutuality; the other is social disconnectedness.
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  22. « Review Of: Mary P. Nichols, Socrates On Friendship And Community: Reflections On Plato’s Symposium, Phaedrus, And Lysis ; And Laurence D. Cooper, Eros In Plato, Rousseau, And Nietzsche: The Politics Of Infinity ». [REVIEW]David Konstan - 2010 - Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society 10.
    Mary P. Nichols, Socrates on Friendship and Community: Reflections on Plato’s Symposium, Phaedrus, and Lysis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008. Pp. viii + 229. ISBN 978-0-521-89973-4. Laurence D. Cooper, Eros in Plato, Rousseau, and Nietzsche: The Politics of Infinity. University Park: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 2008. Pp. xii + 357. ISBN 978-0-271-03330-3.
     
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  23.  70
    Critical Review of Mary Midgley's Intelligent Design Theory and Other Ideological Problems.Nicholas Everitt - 2014 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (4):665-674.
    Mary Midgley's pamphlet Intelligent Design Theory and Other Ideological Problems has been a widely read contribution to discussions of the place of creationism in schools. In this critique of her account, I outline Midgley's view of the relations between science and religion, her claims about what material can legitimately appear in science lessons, and her account of the nature of religion. I argue that she is mistaken in all three areas, and show that her most plausible reply to these (...)
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  24.  4
    Mary Astell’s Theory of Spiritual Friendship.Nancy Kendrick - forthcoming - British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-20.
    Mary Astell’s theory of friendship has been interpreted either as a version of Aristotelian virtue friendship, or as aligned with a Christian and Platonist tradition. In this paper, I argue that Astell’s theory of friendship is determinedly anti-Aristotelian; it is a theory of spiritual friendship offered as an alternative to Aristotelian virtue friendship. By grounding her conception of friendship in a Christian–Platonist metaphysics, I show that Astell rejects the Aristotelian criteria of reciprocity and partiality as essential features of the (...)
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  25.  3
    Mary Wollstonecraft’s Conception of ‘True Taste’ and its Role in Egalitarian Education and Citizenship.Cronin Madeline Ahmed - forthcoming - European Journal of Political Theory.
    Is the possession of taste relevant to the practice of moral and political judgement? For Mary Wollstonecraft and many of her contemporaries, the formation of taste was increasingly significant for both ethics and politics. In fact, some of the key contributors to the debate, which I have termed the ‘politics of taste’, believed that fostering existing standards of taste promised a palliative to modern democratic ills that they diagnosed. Wollstonecraft is an immanent critic of such positions. Although she shares (...)
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  26.  1
    Aapologia Pro Beata Maria Virgine: John Henry Newman's Defence of the Virgin Mary in Catholic Doctrine and Piety [Book Review].Odhran O'Brien - 2017 - Australasian Catholic Record, The 94 (3):374.
    O'Brien, Odhran Review of: Aapologia pro Beata Maria Virgine: John Henry Newman's defence of the Virgin Mary in Catholic doctrine and piety, by Robert M. Andrews, Palo Alto, CA: Academica, 2017, pp. 164, hardback, US$76.95.
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  27. Shifting the Scottish Paradigm: The Discourse of Morals and Manners in Mary Wollstonecraft's French Revolution.D. O'Neill - 2002 - History of Political Thought 23 (1):90-116.
    In the past decade Mary Wollstonecraft has become an increasingly important figure in the history of political thought. However, relatively few interpretations of her work exist. This piece focuses on Wollstonecraft's least-read text, An Historical and Moral View of the Origin and Progress of the French Revolution; and the Effect It Has Produced in Europe . It provides a new interpretation of this work, one that stresses its relation to the Scottish Enlightenment. The argument is that Wollstonecraft's text can (...)
     
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  28.  10
    Representation in Mary Wollstonecraft’s Political Philosophy.Lena Halldenius - unknown
    For Mary Wollstonecraft, the moral purpose of government is to act on the principle of equality and protect the weak against the fact of inequality. The political day-to-day is characterized by classes and groups with competing interests, some more powerful than others. Wollstonecraft was a republican thinker and so it is reasonable to expect in her writings a notion of political society as representative, but how? After placing Wollstonecraft in relation to contemporary republicanism, we can see that Wollstonecraft’s notion (...)
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  29.  15
    Mary Wollstonecraft's Feminist Critique of Property: On Becoming a Thief From Principle.Lena Halldenius - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (4):942-957.
    The scholarship on Mary Wollstonecraft is divided concerning her views on women's role in public life, property rights, and distribution of wealth. Her critique of inequality of wealth is undisputed, but is it a complaint only of inequality or does it strike more forcefully at the institution of property? The argument in this article is that Wollstonecraft's feminism is partly defined by a radical critique of property, intertwined with her conception of rights. Dissociating herself from the conceptualization of rights (...)
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  30.  5
    Lyrical Sociability: The Social Contract and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.Zoe Beenstock - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):406-421.
    Although all readers of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein agree with Victor that his creation of the monster was a mistake, few are certain about how it should be resolved. Shelley offers two vexed solutions to the problem of the creature. The first, explored in the plot of Frankenstein, unfolds with an air of tragic inevitability; Victor destroys his creature and—by extension—himself. But the second solution that Shelley raises, through the creature’s earnest behest that Victor make him a partner, also presents (...)
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  31.  13
    Making an American Feminist Icon: Mary Wollstonecraft's Reception in Us Newspapers, 1800-1869.Eileen Botting - 2013 - History of Political Thought 34 (2):273-295.
    This article examines Mary Wollstonecraft's public reception in American newspapers from 1800 to 1869. Wollstonecraft was portrayed to the American public as a philosopher of women's rights, a new model of femininity, and a pioneer of women's political activism. Although these iconic uses of Wollstonecraft were regularly negative, they grew more positive as the women's rights movement gained steam alongside the abolition movement.
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  32.  13
    Between Order and Chaos, on Peter Greenaway's Postmodern/Poststructuralist Cinema , Edited by Paula Willoquet-Maricondi and Mary Alemany-Galway.Trevor G. Elkington - 2004 - Film-Philosophy 8 (1).
    _Peter Greenaway's Postmodern/Poststructuralist Cinema_ Edited by Paula Willoquet-Maricondi and Mary Alemany-Galway Lanham, MD: The Scarecrow Press, 2001 ISBN 0-8108-3892-3 xxviii + 360 pp.
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  33.  20
    The Gift and the Return: Deconstructing Mary Shelley's Lodore.Graham Allen - 2011 - Derrida Today 4 (1):44-58.
    This paper begins with Barbara Johnson's examination of the erasure of sexual difference within the Yale school, and in particular her comments upon the work of Mary Shelley. Taking up hints in her statements about the relation between Mary Shelley's work and deconstruction, I suggest a reading of Mary Shelley's penultimate novel, Lodore, in relation to Derrida's Given Time. Lodore, which traditionally appeared a rather conservative novel to Mary Shelley's critics, has a number of parallels in (...)
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  34.  3
    The Forbidden Space in Mary, Lady Chudleigh’s “Song: To Lerinda”.Laura Alexander - 2016 - Renascence 68 (2):115-125.
    The Restoration poet Mary, Lady Chudleigh includes in her Poems on Several Occasions a short but important work, "Song: To Lerinda," that blends sacred and sexual love between two women. Better known to readers for her proto-feminist perspective in The Ladies Defense, Chudleigh expresses outrage about the poor treatment of wives, though in this work she does not go so far as to suggest a same-sex union as an alternative to traditional marriage for women. Several shorter works in the (...)
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  35. Review of P. Ludlow, Y. Nagasawa & D. Stoljar , There's Something About Mary: Essays on Phenomenal Consciousness and Frank Jackson's Knowledge Argument. [REVIEW]Torin Alter - 2005 - Psyche 11.
    The titular ‘Mary’ refers to Jackson’s famous protagonist. Her story takes place in the future, when all physical facts have been discovered. This includes “everything in completed physics, chemistry, and neurophysiology, and all there is to know about the causal and relational facts consequent upon all this, including of course functional roles” . Mary learns all this by watching lectures on a monochromatic television monitor. But she spends her life in a black-and-white room and has no color experiences. (...)
     
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  36. Women's Power To Be Loud: The Authority of the Discourse and Authority of the Text in Mary Dorcey's Irish Lesbian Poetic Manifesto "Come Quietly or the Neighbours Will Hear".Katarzyna Poloczek - 2011 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 1 (1):153-169.
    Women's Power To Be Loud: The Authority of the Discourse and Authority of the Text in Mary Dorcey's Irish Lesbian Poetic Manifesto "Come Quietly or the Neighbours Will Hear" The following article aims to examine Mary Dorcey's poem "Come Quietly or the Neighbours Will Hear," included in the 1991 volume Moving into the Space Cleared by Our Mothers. Apart from being a well-known and critically acclaimed Irish poet and fiction writer, the author of the poem has been, from (...)
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  37.  2
    Was Mary’s Death Murder?Suzanne Uniacke - 2001 - Medical Law Review 9 (3):208-220.
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  38.  6
    Swamp Mary’s Revenge: Deviant Phenomenal Knowledge and Physicalism.Pete Mandik - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 148 (2):231-247.
  39.  1
    Mary's Bodily Transfer to Heaven: Examining Haldane's Assumption.Stephen Yates - forthcoming - Heythrop Journal.
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  40.  22
    Mary's Memories.Mark Vernon - 2006 - The Philosophers' Magazine 33:88-88.
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  41.  24
    Mary's Journey.Philip Yancey - 2006 - The Chesterton Review 32 (1/2):232-234.
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  42. Co-Existent Levels of Meaning in Mary's Magnificat.Đurđica Garvanović-Porobija - 2009 - Kairos: Evangelical Journal of Theology 3 (2):171-190.
     
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  43.  12
    Mary MacKillop: A Window of Hope ; Mary Mackillop on Mission to Her Last Breath: Correspondence About the Foundations of the Sisters of St Joseph in Aotearoa New Zealand and Mary's Final Years 1881-1909 [Book Review]. [REVIEW]Brian Lucas - 2011 - The Australasian Catholic Record 88 (1):125.
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  44.  24
    Models as Mediators. Perspectives on Natural and Social Science, Mary S. Morgan and Margaret Morrison (Eds.). Cambridge University Press, 1999, XI + 401 Pages. [REVIEW]Francesco Guala & Stathis Psillos - 2001 - Economics and Philosophy 17 (2):275-294.
  45.  7
    The Origins and Development of the Virgin Mary's Book at the Annunciation.Laura Saetveit Miles - 2014 - Speculum 89 (3):632-669.
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  46.  7
    Virginia Nixon, Mary's Mother: Saint Anne in Late Medieval Europe. University Park, Pa.: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2004. Pp. Xiii, 216; Black-and-White Frontispiece and 36 Black-and-White Figures. [REVIEW]Kathleen Ashley - 2006 - Speculum 81 (2):573-575.
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  47.  4
    Philippe de Mézières' Campaign for the Feast of Mary's Presentation: Edited From Bibliothèque Nationale MSS. Latin 17330 and 14454. Philippe de Mézières, William E. Coleman. [REVIEW]Richard W. Pfaff - 1983 - Speculum 58 (2):521-522.
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  48.  6
    Tolerance in Society and Church.[A Talk Given in St Mary's Cathedral, Sydney, on 21 Feb 1995].Joseph Louis Bernardin - 1995 - The Australasian Catholic Record 72 (3):365.
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  49.  9
    An Asterisk Denotes a Publication by a Member of the American Catholic Philosophical Association. The Editors Welcome Suggestions for Reviews. Allman, Mark J. Who Would Jesus Kill? War, Peace, and the Christian Tradition. Winona, Minn.: St. Mary's Press, 2008. Pp. 325. Paper $24.95, ISBN: 978-0-88489-984-6. [REVIEW]G. E. M. Anscombe & St Thomas Aquinas - 2008 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (4).
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  50.  3
    The Anonimalle Chronicle, 1333 to 1381, From a MS. Written at St. Mary's Abbey, York, and Now in the Possession of Lieut.-Col. Sir Wiliam Ingilby, Bart., Ripley Castle, Yorkshire. V. H. Galbraith. [REVIEW]W. E. Lunt - 1928 - Speculum 3 (1):120-121.
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