Results for 'Matching'

703 found
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  1.  66
    Behavior Matching in Multimodal Communication is Synchronized.Max M. Louwerse, Rick Dale, Ellen G. Bard & Patrick Jeuniaux - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (8):1404-1426.
    A variety of theoretical frameworks predict the resemblance of behaviors between two people engaged in communication, in the form of coordination, mimicry, or alignment. However, little is known about the time course of the behavior matching, even though there is evidence that dyads synchronize oscillatory motions (e.g., postural sway). This study examined the temporal structure of nonoscillatory actions—language, facial, and gestural behaviors—produced during a route communication task. The focus was the temporal relationship between matching behaviors in the interlocutors (...)
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  2.  59
    Colour Constancy, Illumination, and Matching.Will Davies - 2016 - Philosophy of Science 83 (4):540-562.
    Colour constancy is a foundational and yet puzzling phenomenon. Standard appearance invariantism is threatened by the psychophysical matching argument, which is taken to favour variantism. This argument, however, is inconclusive. The data at best support a pluralist view: colour constancy is sometimes variantist, sometimes invariantist. I add another potential explanation of these data, complex invariantism, which adopts an atypical six-dimensional model of colour appearance. Finally I prospect for a unifying conception of constancy among two neglected notions: discriminatory colour constancy (...)
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  3.  48
    Ambition Versus Conscience, Does Corporate Social Responsibility Pay Off? The Application of Matching Methods.Chung-Hua Shen & Yuan Chang - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S1):133 - 153.
    In this article, we examine the effect of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on firms' financial performance (CSR-effect). Two competing hypotheses, social impact hypothesis and shift of focus hypothesis, are proposed to investigate this issue, where the former suggests that CSR has a positive relation with performance and the latter are opposite. In order to ensure the CSR-effect is not contaminated by other faeton or samples are randomly drawn, we employ four matching methods, Nearest, Caliper, Mahala and Mahala Caliper to (...)
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  4.  24
    Stability and Efficiency of Partitions in Matching Problems.İpek Özkal-Sanver - 2005 - Theory and Decision 59 (3):193-205.
    We define two versions of stability and efficiency of partitions and analyze their relationships for some matching rules. The stability and efficiency of a partition depends on the matching rule φ. The results are stated under various membership property rights axioms. It is shown that in a world where agents can freely exit from and enter coalitions, whenever the matching rule is individually rational and Pareto optimal, the set of φ-stable and φ-efficient partitions coincide and it is (...)
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  5.  33
    Coalitional Stability and Efficiency of Partitions in Matching Problems.Duygu Nizamogullari & İpek Özkal-Sanver - 2011 - Theory and Decision 71 (3):395-407.
    Özkal-Sanver (Theory Decis 59:193–205, 2005) studies stability and efficiency of partitions of agents in two-sided matching markets in which agents can form partitions by individual moves only, and a matching rule determines the matching in each coalition in a partition. In this study, we present the relationship between stability and efficiency of partitions that is analyzed for several matching rules and under various membership property rights codes, now allowing coalitional moves.
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  6.  41
    Stability and Nash Implementation in Matching Markets with Couples.Claus-Jochen Haake & Bettina Klaus - 2010 - Theory and Decision 69 (4):537-554.
    We consider two-sided matching markets with couples. First, we extend a result by Klaus and Klijn (J Econ Theory 21: 75–106, 2005, Theorem 3.3) and show that for any weakly responsive couples market, there always exists a “double stable” matching, i.e., a matching that is stable for the couples market and for any associated singles market. Second, we show that for weakly responsive couples markets, the associated stable correspondence is (Maskin) monotonic and Nash implementable. In contrast, the (...)
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  7.  16
    Equitable Selection in Bilateral Matching Markets.Antonio Romero-Medina - 2005 - Theory and Decision 58 (3):305-324.
    This paper presents a procedure to select equitable stable allocations in two-sided matching markets without side payments. The Equitable set is computed using the Equitable algorithm. The algorithm limits the set of options available for each agent throughout the procedure. The stable matchings selected are generally not extreme, form a lattice and satisfy the condition of being “Ralwsian” in each partition of the market. The Equitable algorithm can also be used to select a particular matching from the Equitable (...)
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  8.  20
    Preferences and the Price of Stability in Matching Markets.James W. Boudreau & Vicki Knoblauch - 2013 - Theory and Decision 74 (4):565-589.
    This paper studies welfare tradeoffs in two-sided, one-to-one matching markets. We begin by providing theoretical upper bounds on a utilitarian price of stability, and show that these bounds vary with the composition of participants’ ordinal preference lists. We then turn to simulation experiments to describe how changes in basic characteristics of agents’ preferences can increase or decrease the average price of stability as measured by both utilitarian and Rawlsian welfare criteria. Our results indicate that markets featuring moderate degrees of (...)
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  9.  35
    Are People Successful at Learning Sequences of Actions on a Perceptual Matching Task?Reiko Yakushijin & Robert A. Jacobs - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (5):939-962.
    We report the results of an experiment in which human subjects were trained to perform a perceptual matching task. Subjects were asked to manipulate comparison objects until they matched target objects using the fewest manipulations possible. An unusual feature of the experimental task is that efficient performance requires an understanding of the hidden or latent causal structure governing the relationships between actions and perceptual outcomes. We use two benchmarks to evaluate the quality of subjects’ learning. One benchmark is based (...)
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  10.  3
    Using Balance Statistics to Determine the Optimal Number of Controls in Matching Studies.Ariel Linden & Steven J. Samuels - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (5):968-975.
  11.  36
    Holistic Modeling: An Objection to Weisberg’s Weighted Feature-Matching Account.Wei Fang - 2017 - Synthese 194 (5).
    Michael Weisberg’s account of scientific models concentrates on the ways in which models are similar to their targets. He intends not merely to explain what similarity consists in, but also to capture similarity judgments made by scientists. In order to scrutinize whether his account fulfills this goal, I outline one common way in which scientists judge whether a model is similar enough to its target, namely maximum likelihood estimation method. Then I consider whether Weisberg’s account could capture the judgments involved (...)
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  12.  3
    Human–Computer Interaction in Face Matching.Matthew C. Fysh & Markus Bindemann - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (5):1714-1732.
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  13.  4
    Parallel and Serial Stages in Matching.Henry K. Beller - 1970 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 84 (2):213.
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  14.  37
    On the Existence of Fair Matching Algorithms.F. Masarani & S. S. Gokturk - 1989 - Theory and Decision 26 (3):305-322.
  15.  56
    Phenomenal Qualities and the Nontransitivity of Matching.John A. Burgess - 1990 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 68 (2):206-220.
  16.  6
    Familiarity Effects in the Simultaneous Matching Task.William H. Eichelman - 1970 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 86 (2):275.
  17.  5
    Priming: Effects of Advance Information on Matching.Henry K. Beller - 1971 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 87 (2):176.
  18.  4
    Influence of Interference on Delayed Matching in Monkeys.M. E. Jarvik, T. L. Goldfarb & J. L. Carley - 1969 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 81 (1):1.
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  19.  8
    Persistence of Visual Memory as Indicated by Decision Time in a Matching Task.Theodore E. Parks, Neal E. Kroll, Philip M. Salzberg & Stanley R. Parkinson - 1972 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 92 (3):437.
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  20.  11
    Discriminative Skill and Discriminative Matching in Perceptual Recognition.Jerome S. Bruner, George A. Miller & Claire Zimmerman - 1955 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 49 (3):187.
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  21.  1
    Size Matching as a Function of Instructions in a Naturalistic Environment.H. W. Leibowitz & Lewis O. Harvey - 1967 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 74 (3):378-382.
  22.  5
    Analysis of "Physical" Matching Task for Simultaneously Presented Pairs of Letters.Maurice Hershenson & Kenneth P. Price - 1973 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 97 (2):198.
  23.  6
    Concept Learning and Probability Matching.George Mandler, Philip A. Cowan & Cecile Gold - 1964 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 67 (6):514.
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  24.  6
    Processing Capacity in a Letter-Matching Task.Elizabeth M. Comstock - 1973 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 100 (1):63.
  25.  5
    Effects of Segmentation and Expectancy on Matching Time for Words and Nonwords.Robert M. Schindler, Arnold D. Well & Alexander Pollatsek - 1974 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (1):107.
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  26.  4
    Some Factors in Probability Matching.Irvin Rubinstein - 1959 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 57 (6):413.
  27.  3
    Pattern Recognition: Differences Between Matching Patterns to Patterns and Matching Descriptions to Patterns.Gillian Cohen - 1969 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 82 (3):427.
  28.  3
    Stimulus Itensity and the Asymmetrical Matching Principle.Sandra Harris & E. Neil Murray - 1970 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 84 (2):257.
  29.  2
    Time Course of Identity and Category Matching by Spatial Orientation.Merrill F. Elias & Marcel Kinsbourne - 1972 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (1):177.
  30.  2
    Verbal Report and Visual Matching Latency as a Function of the Pronounceability of Letter Arrays.Maurice Hershenson - 1972 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 96 (1):104.
  31.  2
    Visual Pattern Matching: An Investigation of Some Effects of Decision Task, Auditory Codability, and Spatial Correspondence.R. S. Nickerson & R. W. Pew - 1973 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 98 (1):36.
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  32.  1
    Haptic Equivalence Matching of Curvature by Blind and Sighted Humans.Philip W. Davidson & Teresa T. Whitson - 1974 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (4):687.
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  33.  1
    Probability Matching in Concept Identification.J. Brown Grier & Robert Bornstein - 1966 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 71 (3):339.
  34. Peer Commentary on Are There Neural Correlates of Consciousness: Is There a Content Matching Doctrine?Jean-Michel Roy - 2004 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (1):77-79.
  35.  28
    Matching Bias in Syllogistic Reasoning: Evidence for a Dual-Process Account From Response Times and Confidence Ratings.Edward J. N. Stupple, Linden J. Ball & Daniel Ellis - 2013 - Thinking and Reasoning 19 (1):54 - 77.
    (2013). Matching bias in syllogistic reasoning: Evidence for a dual-process account from response times and confidence ratings. Thinking & Reasoning: Vol. 19, No. 1, pp. 54-77. doi: 10.1080/13546783.2012.735622.
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  36.  67
    Matching Bias in Conditional Reasoning: Do We Understand It After 25 Years?Jonathan St B. T. Evans - 1998 - Thinking and Reasoning 4 (1):45 – 110.
    The phenomenon known as matching bias consists of a tendency to see cases as relevant in logical reasoning tasks when the lexical content of a case matches that of a propositional rule, normally a conditional, which applies to that case. Matching is demonstrated by use of the negations paradigm that is by using conditionals in which the presence and absence of negative components is systematically varied. The phenomenon was first published in 1972 and the present paper reviews the (...)
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  37.  12
    A Replication of the 5–7day Dream-Lag Effect with Comparison of Dreams to Future Events as Control for Baseline Matching[REVIEW]Mark Blagrove, Josie Henley-Einion, Amanda Barnett, Darren Edwards & C. Heidi Seage - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):384-391.
    The dream-lag effect refers to there being, after the frequent incorporation of memory elements from the previous day into dreams , a lower incorporation of memory elements from 2 to 4 days before the dream, but then an increased incorporation of memory elements from 5 to 7 days before the dream. Participants kept a daily diary and a dream diary for 14 days and then rated the level of matching between every dream report and every daily diary record. Baseline (...)
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  38. Young Children Reorient by Computing Layout Geometry, Not by Matching Images of the Environment.Sang Ah Lee & Elizabeth S. Spelke - unknown
    Disoriented animals from ants to humans reorient in accord with the shape of the surrounding surface layout: a behavioral pattern long taken as evidence for sensitivity to layout geometry. Recent computational models suggest, however, that the reorientation process may not depend on geometrical analyses but instead on the matching of brightness contours in 2D images of the environment. Here we test this suggestion by investigating young children's reorientation in enclosed environments. Children reoriented by extremely subtle geometric properties of the (...)
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  39. Color Perception and Neural Encoding: Does Metameric Matching Entail a Loss of Information?Gary Hatfield - 1992 - In David Hull & Mickey Forbes (eds.), PSA 1992: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association, Volume One: Contributed Papers. Philosophy of Science Association. pp. 492-504.
    It seems intuitively obvious that metameric matching of color samples entails a loss of information, for spectrophotometrically diverse materials appear the same. This intuition implicitly relies on a conception of the function of color vision and on a related conception of how color samples should be individuated. It assumes that the function of color vision is to distinguish among spectral energy distributions, and that color samples should be individuated by their physical properties. I challenge these assumptions by articulating a (...)
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  40.  26
    Matching Bias on the Selection Task: It's Fast and Feels Good.Valerie A. Thompson, Jonathan St B. T. Evans & Jamie I. D. Campbell - 2013 - Thinking and Reasoning 19 (3-4):431-452.
    We tested the hypothesis that choices determined by Type 1 processes are compelling because they are fluent, and for this reason they are less subject to analytic thinking than other answers. A total of 104 participants completed a modified version of Wason's selection task wherein they made decisions about one card at a time using a two-response paradigm. In this paradigm participants gave a fast, intuitive response, rated their feeling of rightness for that response, and were then allowed free time (...)
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  41.  71
    On the Matching of Seen and Felt Shape by Newly Sighted Subjects.John Schwenkler - 2012 - I-Perception 3 (3):186-188.
    How do we recognize identities between seen shapes and felt ones? Is this due to associative learning, or to intrinsic connections these sensory modalities? We can address this question by testing the capacities of newly sighted subjects to match seen and felt shapes, but only if it is shown that the subjects can see the objects well enough to form adequate visual representations of their shapes. In light of this, a recent study by R. Held and colleagues fails to demonstrate (...)
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  42.  45
    Temporal Sequences Quantify the Contributions of Individual Fixations in Complex Perceptual Matching Tasks.Thomas Busey, Chen Yu, Dean Wyatte & John Vanderkolk - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (4):731-756.
    Perceptual tasks such as object matching, mammogram interpretation, mental rotation, and satellite imagery change detection often require the assignment of correspondences to fuse information across views. We apply techniques developed for machine translation to the gaze data recorded from a complex perceptual matching task modeled after fingerprint examinations. The gaze data provide temporal sequences that the machine translation algorithm uses to estimate the subjects' assumptions of corresponding regions. Our results show that experts and novices have similar surface behavior, (...)
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  43.  30
    Contrast Classes and Matching Bias as Explanations of the Effects of Negation on Conditional Reasoning.Mike Oaksford - 2002 - Thinking and Reasoning 8 (2):135 – 151.
    In this paper the arguments for optimal data selection and the contrast class account of negations in the selection task and the conditional inference task are summarised, and contrasted with the matching bias approach. It is argued that the probabilistic contrast class account provides a unified, rational explanation for effects across these tasks. Moreover, there are results that are only explained by the contrast class account that are also discussed. The only major anomaly is the explicit negations effect in (...)
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  44.  25
    Kinesthetic-Visual Matching and the Self-Concept as Explanations of Mirror-Self-Recognition.Robert W. Mitchell - 1997 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 27 (1):17–39.
    Since its inception as a topic of inquiry, mirror-self-recognition has usually been explained by two models: one, initiated by Guillaume, proposes that mirror-self-recognition depends upon kinesthetic-visual matching, and the other, initiated by Gallup, that self-recognition depends upon a self-concept. These two models are examined historically and conceptually. This examination suggests that the kinesthetic-visual matching model is conceptually coherent and makes reasonable and accurate predictions; and that the self-concept model is conceptually incoherent and makes inaccurate predictions from premises which (...)
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  45.  21
    Color Matching and Color Naming: A Response to Roberts and Schmidtke.R. G. Kuehni & C. L. Hardin - 2015 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 6 (2):199-205.
    In their article ‘In defense of incompatibility, objectivism, and veridicality about color’ P. Roberts and K. Schmidtke offer the results of an experiment supposed to show that if selection of colored samples representing unique hues for subjects has a greater inter-subject variability than identification of sample pairs with no perceptual difference between them the result provides support for the philosophical concept of color realism. On examining the results in detail, we find that, according to standard statistical methodology, the relative magnitude (...)
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  46. No-Forcing and No-Matching Theorems for Classical Probability Applied to Quantum Mechanics.Ehtibar N. Dzhafarov & Janne V. Kujala - 2014 - Foundations of Physics 44 (3):248-265.
    Correlations of spins in a system of entangled particles are inconsistent with Kolmogorov’s probability theory (KPT), provided the system is assumed to be non-contextual. In the Alice–Bob EPR paradigm, non-contextuality means that the identity of Alice’s spin (i.e., the probability space on which it is defined as a random variable) is determined only by the axis $\alpha _{i}$ chosen by Alice, irrespective of Bob’s axis $\beta _{j}$ (and vice versa). Here, we study contextual KPT models, with two properties: (1) Alice’s (...)
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  47.  33
    Matching Versus Optimal Data Selection in the Wason Selection Task.Hiroshi Yama - 2001 - Thinking and Reasoning 7 (3):295 – 311.
    It has been reported as a robust effect that people are likely to select a matching case in the Wason selection task. For example, they usually select the 5 case, in the Wason selection task with the conditional "if an E, then a not-5". This was explained by the matching bias account that people are likely to regard a matching case as relevant to the truth of the conditional (Evans, 1998). However, because a positive concept usually constructs (...)
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  48.  89
    Matching Sensible Qualities: A Skeleton in the Closet for Representationalism.Robert Schroer - 2002 - Philosophical Studies 107 (3):259-73.
    The intransitivity of matching sensible qualities of color is a threat not only to the sense-data theory, but to all realist theories of sensible qualities, including the current leading realist theory: representationalism. I save representationalism from this threat by way of a novel yet empirically plausible hypothesis about the introspective classification of sensible qualities of color. I argue that due to limitations of the visual system's ability to extract fine-grained information about color from the environment, introspective classification of sensible (...)
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  49.  53
    Deductive Reasoning and Matching-Bias Inhibition Training: Evidence From a Debiasing Paradigm.Sylvain Moutier, Nathalie Angeard & Olivier Houde - 2002 - Thinking and Reasoning 8 (3):205 – 224.
    Using the matching bias example, the aim of the present studies was to show that adults' reasoning biases are due to faulty executive inhibition programming. In the first study, the subjects were trained on Wason's classical card selection task; half were given training in how to inhibit the perceptual matching bias (experimental group) and half in logic without the inhibition component (control group). On the pre- and post-tests, their performance was assessed on the Evans conditional rule falsification task (...)
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  50.  76
    The Mirror Matching System: A Shared Manifold for Intersubjectivity.Vittorio Gallese, Pier Francesco Ferrari & Maria Alessandra Umiltà - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):35-36.
    Empathy is the phenomenal experience of mirroring ourselves into others. It can be explained in terms of simulations of actions, sensations, and emotions which constitute a shared manifold for intersubjectivity. Simulation, in turn, can be sustained at the subpersonal level by a series of neural mirror matching systems.
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