9 found
Order:
See also
Profile: Mathew Abbott (University of Sydney)
  1. The Poetic Experience of the World.Mathew Abbott - 2010 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 18 (4):493-516.
    In this article I develop Heidegger's phenomenology of poetry, showing that it may provide grounds for rejecting claims that he lapses into linguistic idealism. Proceeding via an analysis of the three concepts of language operative in the philosopher's work, I demonstrate how poetic language challenges language's designative and world-disclosive functions. The experience with poetic language, which disrupts Dasein's absorption by emerging out of equipmentality in the mode of the broken tool, brings Dasein to wonder at the world's existence in such (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. The Animal for Which Animality is an Issue: Nietzsche, Agamben, and the Anthropological Machine.Mathew Abbott - 2011 - Angelaki 16 (4):87 - 99.
  3. On Not Loving Everyone: Comments on Jean-Luc Nancy's “L’Amour En Éclats" ["Shattered Love"].Mathew Abbott - 2011 - Glossator 5:139-62.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  77
    No Life is Bare, the Ordinary is Exceptional: Giorgio Agamben and the Question of Political Ontology.Mathew Abbott - 2012 - Parrhesia 14:23-36.
    In this article I develop a theory of political ontology, working to differentiate it from traditional political philosophy and Schmittian political theology. As with political theology, political ontology has its primary grounding not in disinterested contemplation from the standpoint of pure reason, but rather in a confrontation with an existential problem. Yet while for Schmitt this is the problem of how to live and think in obedience to God, the problem for political ontology is the question of being. Thus the (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  4
    The Problem of Wild Minds: Knowing Animals in Grizzly Man and Ming of Harlem.Mathew Abbott - 2016 - Substance 45 (3):137-154.
    Near the end of W. G. Sebald’s Austerlitz, the book’s eponymous protagonist recalls visiting the zoo of the Jardin des Plantes with his friend Marie.1 The zoo is in bad shape; the pair overhear children questioning their parents: “Mais il est où? Pourquoi il se cache? Pourquoi il ne bouge pas? Est-ce qu’il est mort?” Sebald writes:I recollect that I myself saw a family of fallow deer gathered together by a manger of hay near the perimeter fence of a dusty (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  36
    Kiarostami's Picture Theory: Cinematic Skepticism in The Wind Will Carry Us.Mathew Abbott - 2013 - Substance 42 (1):165-179.
    The Wind Will Carry Us (1999) opens with a series of long takes of a car winding steadily down a road in the Iranian countryside. In other words, it opens with a sequence which, to anybody who knows Kiarostami's work, will be immediately recognizable as typical of it: Life and Nothing More (1992) returns repeatedly to such sequences, and ends with one; such sequences turn up in Through the Olive Trees (1994) and Taste of Cherry (1997); the protagonist of Where (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Michael Fried and Philosophy: Absorption, Theatricality, and Modernism.Mathew Abbott (ed.) - 2017 - Routledge.
    This book brings together philosophers, literary theorists, and art historians to argue for the philosophical significance of Michael Fried’s art history and criticism. It demonstrates that Fried’s analyses of absorption and theatricality, and the accounts of modernism he develops from them, can throw new light on problems in aesthetics, and questions of authenticity, scepticism, modernity, and politics. Featuring an essay by Fried and articles from world-leading scholars, this collection contributes to current debates in aesthetics, modernism studies, literary studies, art theory, (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. The Creature Before the Law: Notes on Walter Benjamin’s Critique of Violence.Mathew Abbott - 2008 - Colloquy 16:80-95.
    Transforming as it does from an exemplar of meticulous philosophical analysis into an allusive political/messianic tract, Walter Benjamin’s “Critique of Violence” is representative of all that is most difficult about his work. Against those critics who find the eschatological dimensions of Benjamin’s texts unpalatable and/or philosophically bankrupt, 1 however, the wager of this paper is that it is possible to extract a philosophically sophisticated and politically interesting concept of the messianic from Benjamin. For it remains the case that the mortification (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. The Figure of This World: Agamben and the Question of Political Ontology.Mathew Abbott - 2014 - Edinburgh University Press.
    Introduction: the figure of this world -- 1. The question of political ontology -- 2. The poetic experience of the world -- 3. The myth of the earth -- 4. The unbearable -- 5. The creature before the law -- 6. The animal for which animality is an issue -- 7. Understanding the happy -- 8. The picture and its captives -- 9. The passing of the figure of this world.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography