Results for 'Matt E. Bower'

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  1. Daubert’s Naïve Realist Challenge to Husserl.Matt E. M. Bower - 2019 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 96 (2):211-243.
    Despite extensive discussion of naïve realism in the wider philosophical literature, those influenced by the phenomenological movement who work in the philosophy of perception have hardly weighed in on the matter. It is thus interesting to discover that Edmund Husserl’s close philosophical interlocutor and friend, the early twentieth-century phenomenologist Johannes Daubert, held the naive realist view. This article presents Daubert’s views on the fundamental nature of perceptual experience and shows how they differ radically from those of Husserl’s. The author argues, (...)
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  2.  35
    Husserl on Hallucination: A Conjunctive Reading.Matt E. Bower - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (3):549-579.
    One of Edmund Husserl's theoretical priorities throughout his philosophical career was to understand the nature of perceptual experience. His analyses of perceptual experience had a profound impact on subsequent thinkers in the phenomenological tradition, such as Aron Gurwitsch and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Naturally, his account of perception remains a topic of discussion among Husserl scholars. Despite the attention it has received over many decades, Husserl interpreters diverge considerably in how they understand his views and their relation to current debates in the (...)
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  3. Husserl on Hallucination: A Conjunctive Reading.Matt E. Bower - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (3):549-579.
    Several commentators have recently attributed conflicting accounts of the relation between veridical perceptual experience and hallucination to Husserl. Some say he is a proponent of the conjunctive view that the two kinds of experience are fundamentally the same. Others deny this and purport to find in Husserl distinct and non-overlapping accounts of their fundamental natures, thus committing him to a disjunctive view. My goal is to set the record straight. Having briefly laid out the problem under discussion and the terms (...)
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  4.  43
    Phenomenological Reduction and the Nature of Perceptual Experience.Matt E. M. Bower - 2023 - Husserl Studies 39 (2):161-178.
    Interpretations abound about Husserl’s understanding of the relationship between veridical perceptual experience and hallucination. Some read him as taking the two to share the same distinctive essential nature, like contemporary conjunctivists. Others find in Husserl grounds for taking the two to fall into basically distinct categories of experience, like disjunctivists. There is ground for skepticism, however, about whether Husserl’s view could possibly fall under either of these headings. Husserl, on the one hand, operates under the auspices of the phenomenological reduction, (...)
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  5. Husserl’s theory of instincts as a theory of affection.Matt E. M. Bower - 2014 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 45 (2):133-147.
    Husserl’s theory of passive experience first came to systematic and detailed expression in the lectures on passive synthesis from the early 1920s, where he discusses pure passivity under the rubric of affection and association. In this paper I suggest that this familiar theory of passive experience is a first approximation leaving important questions unanswered. Focusing primarily on affection, I will show that Husserl did not simply leave his theory untouched. In later manuscripts he significantly reworks the theory of affection in (...)
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  6.  42
    Levinas's Philosophy of Perception.Matt E. M. Bower - 2017 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 55 (4):383-414.
    Levinas is usually discussed as a philosopher wrestling with the nature of our experience of others, ethical obligation, and the divine. Unlike other phenomenologists, such as Husserl and Heidegger, he is not often mentioned in discussions about issues in philosophy of mind. His work in that area, especially on perception, is underappreciated. He gives an account of the nature of perceptual experience that is remarkable both in how it departs from that of others in the phenomenological tradition and for how (...)
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  7.  20
    Sociality and the minimal self: On Dan Zahavi’s “group‐identification, collectivism, and perspectival autonomy”.Matt E. M. Bower - 2023 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 61 (S1):78-85.
    I present and critically examine Dan Zahavi's view that minimal selfhood and self-awareness per se do not have a social character. I argue that Zahavi's conception of the minimal self as fundamentally asocial makes it hard to comprehend the unity of the self and that it is partly the result of an overly narrow conception of what it might mean for the self to be social.
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  8. Do We Visually Experience Objects’ Occluded Parts?Matt E. M. Bower - 2021 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 51 (4):239-255.
    A number of philosophers have held that we visually experience objects’ occluded parts, such as the out-of-view exterior of a voluminous, opaque object. That idea is supposed to be what best explains the fact that we see objects as whole or complete despite having only a part of them in view at any given moment. Yet, the claim doesn’t express a phenomenological datum and the reasons for thinking we do experience objects’ occluded parts, I argue, aren’t compelling. Additionally, I anticipate (...)
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  9.  52
    Is perception inadequate? Husserl's case for non‐sensory objectual phenomenology in perception.Matt E. M. Bower - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 30 (2):755-777.
    European Journal of Philosophy, Volume 30, Issue 2, Page 755-777, June 2022.
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  10.  42
    Is perception inadequate? Husserl's case for non‐sensory objectual phenomenology in perception.Matt E. M. Bower - 2022 - European Journal of Philosophy 30 (2):755-777.
    One key difference between perceptual experience and thought is the distinctly sensory way perception presents things to us. Some philosophers nevertheless suggest this sensory phenomenal character does not exhaust the way things are made manifest to us in perceptual experience. Edmund Husserl maintains that there is also a significant non‐sensory side to perception's phenomenal character. We may experience, for instance, an object's facing surface in a sensory mode and, as part of the same perceptual experience, also that object's out‐of‐view surface (...)
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  11.  28
    Finding a Way Into Genetic Phenomenology.Matt E. M. Bower - 2019 - In Iulian Apostolescu (ed.), The Subject(s) of Phenomenology. Rereading Husserl. Springer. pp. 185-200.
    The relation of genetic phenomenology and the project of phenomenological reduction is the primary concern of this paper. Despite Husserl’s occasional loose references to “the” reduction, performing the reduction actually refers to numerous interrelated techniques. I want here to delve into these intricacies with the aim of determining the place of genetic phenomenology within the whole of phenomenological technique. It will be necessary to both state in general terms what the aim of the reduction is and what the different “ways” (...)
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  12. Affectively Driven Perception: Toward a Non-representational Phenomenology.Matt Bower - 2014 - Husserl Studies 30 (3):225-245.
    While classical phenomenology, as represented by Edmund Husserl’s work, resists certain forms of representationalism about perception, I argue that in its theory of horizons, it posits representations in the sense of content-bearing vehicles. As part of a phenomenological theory, this means that on the Husserlian view such representations are part of the phenomenal character of perceptual experience. I believe that, although the intuitions supporting this idea are correct, it is a mistake to maintain that there are such representations defining the (...)
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  13.  29
    Husserl’s Concept of the Vorwelt and the Possible Annihilation of the World.Matt Bower - 2015 - Research in Phenomenology 45 (1):108-126.
    In this paper I explore a curious phenomenon discussed in Husserl’s later manuscripts under the name “pre-world.” This notion arises in the context of his ongoing development of a genetic phenomenology, i.e., a phenomenology that is concerned with the dynamics of conscious life, concerning both the generation of new meaning for consciousness and new dimensions of conscious life. The pre-world is one such dimension. I explore it here in two stages. First, I consider the initial unsavoriness of the very idea (...)
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  14.  53
    Rasmus Thybo Jensen and Dermot Moran : The Phenomenology of Embodied Subjectivity. [REVIEW]Matt Bower - 2015 - Husserl Studies 31 (2):159-167.
    The recently published volume Rasmus Thybo Jensen and Dermot Moran have put together, The Phenomenology of Embodied Subjectivity, displays the richness that phenomenological approaches to embodiment have to offer, both in terms of the many insights of some of its major figures and as a style of inquiry that continues to be aptly deployed in diverse theoretical contexts. As such, the collection is accessible to a broad audience. The phenomenological perspectives represented are primarily those of Husserlian phenomenology and, to a (...)
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  15. Matter, form, and individuation.Jeffrey E. Bower - 2011 - In Brian Davies & Eleonore Stump (eds.), The Oxford handbook of Aquinas. New York: Oxford University Press.
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  16.  24
    Philosophy, Feminism, and Faith.Ruth E. Groenhout & Marya Bower (eds.) - 2003 - Indiana University Press.
    "The stories are powerful, sometimes heart-rending, sometimes lyrical, but always deeply personal. And there is some very good philosophizing as part of the bargain." —Merold Westphal How can the seemingly separate lives of philosopher, feminist, and follower of a religious tradition come together in one person’s life? How does religious commitment affect philosophy or feminism? How does feminism play out in religious or philosophical commitment? Wrestling with answers to these questions, women who balance philosophy, feminism, and faith write about their (...)
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  17. Another Look at Husserl’s Treatment of the Thing in Itself.Matt Bower - manuscript
    It is a familiar story that, where Kant humbly draws a line beyond which cognition can’t reach, Husserl presses forward to show how we can cognize beyond that limit. Kant supposes that cognition is bound to sensibility and that what we experience in sensibility is mere appearance that does not inform us about the intrinsic nature of things in themselves. By contrast, for Husserl, it makes no sense to say we experience anything other than things in themselves when we enjoy (...)
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  18. Bodily Affects as Prenoetic Elements in Enactive Perception.Matt Bower & Shaun Gallagher - 2013 - Phenomenology and Mind 4 (1):78-93.
    In this paper we attempt to advance the enactive discourse on perception by highlighting the role of bodily affects as prenoetic constraints on perceptual experience. Enactivists argue for an essential connection between perception and action, where action primarily means skillful bodily intervention in one’s surroundings. Analyses of sensory-motor contingencies (as in Noë 2004) are important contributions to the enactive account. Yet this is an incomplete story since sensory-motor contingencies are of no avail to the perceiving agent without motivational pull in (...)
     
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  19. Husserl’s Motivation and Method for Phenomenological Reconstruction.Matt Bower - 2014 - Continental Philosophy Review 47 (2):135-152.
    In this paper I piece present an account of Husserl’s approach to the phenomenological reconstruction of consciousness’ immemorial past, a problem, I suggest, that is quite pertinent for defenders of Lockean psychological continuity views of personal identity. To begin, I sketch the background of the problem facing the very project of a genetic phenomenology, within which the reconstructive analysis is situated. While the young Husserl took genetic matters to be irrelevant to the main task of phenomenology, he would later come (...)
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  20.  48
    Husserl on Perception: A Nonrepresentationalism That Nearly Was.Matt Bower - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):1768-1790.
    There is a longstanding debate among Husserl scholars about whether Husserl thinks perception involves mental representation. The debate, I believe, has not been settled. I deny that the existentialist-inspired charge of representationalism about perception in Husserl is precise enough to stick. Given a clearer understanding of just what mental representation amounts to, I contend that those who defend Husserl against the accusation of representationalism fare little better than Husserl's existentialist-leaning critics. I argue that he is in fact a representationalist about (...)
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  21.  79
    Categorical Desires and the Badness of Animal Death.Matt Bower & Bob Fischer - 2018 - Journal of Value Inquiry 52 (1):97-111.
    One way to defend humane animal agriculture is to insist that the deaths of animals aren’t bad for them. Christopher Belshaw has argued for this position in the most detail, maintaining that death is only bad when it frustrates categorical desires, which he thinks animals lack. We are prepared to grant his account of the badness of death, but we are skeptical of the claim that animals don’t have categorical desires. We contend that Belshaw’s argument against the badness of animal (...)
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  22. Developing open intersubjectivity: On the interpersonal shaping of experience.Matt Bower - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (3):455-474.
    The aim of this paper is to motivate the need for and then present the outline of an alternative explanation of what Dan Zahavi has dubbed “open intersubjectivity,” which captures the basic interpersonal character of perceptual experience as such. This is a notion whose roots lay in Husserl’s phenomenology. Accordingly, the paper begins by situating the notion of open intersubjectivity – as well as the broader idea of constituting intersubjectivity to which it belongs – within Husserl’s phenomenology as an approach (...)
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  23. Teamwork and team training.E. Salas & J. Cannon-Bowers - 2001 - In N. J. Smelser & B. Baltes (eds.), International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. pp. 23--15487.
     
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  24.  39
    Prediction plays a key role in language development as well as processing.Matt A. Johnson, Nicholas B. Turk-Browne & Adele E. Goldberg - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):360-361.
    Although the target article emphasizes the important role of prediction in language use, prediction may well also play a key role in the initial formation of linguistic representations, that is, in language development. We outline the role of prediction in three relevant language-learning domains: transitional probabilities, statistical preemption, and construction learning.
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  25.  33
    Deep problems with neural network models of human vision.Jeffrey S. Bowers, Gaurav Malhotra, Marin Dujmović, Milton Llera Montero, Christian Tsvetkov, Valerio Biscione, Guillermo Puebla, Federico Adolfi, John E. Hummel, Rachel F. Heaton, Benjamin D. Evans, Jeffrey Mitchell & Ryan Blything - 2023 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 46:e385.
    Deep neural networks (DNNs) have had extraordinary successes in classifying photographic images of objects and are often described as the best models of biological vision. This conclusion is largely based on three sets of findings: (1) DNNs are more accurate than any other model in classifying images taken from various datasets, (2) DNNs do the best job in predicting the pattern of human errors in classifying objects taken from various behavioral datasets, and (3) DNNs do the best job in predicting (...)
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  26. Problems for Foley's Accounts of Rational Belief and Responsible Belief.E. J. Coffman & Matt Deaton - 2013 - Res Philosophica 90 (2):147-160.
    In this paper, we argue that Richard Foley’s account of rational belief faces an as yet undefeated objection, then try to repair one of Foley’s two failed replies to that objection. In §§I-III, we explain Foley’s accounts of all-things-considered rational belief and responsible belief, along with his replies to two pressing objections to those accounts—what we call the Irrelevance Objection(to Foley’s account of rational belief) and the Insufficiency Objection (to his account of responsible belief). In §IV, we argue that both (...)
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  27.  29
    Multi-asperity contact: A comparison between discrete dislocation and crystal plasticity predictions.L. Nicola, A. F. Bower, K. -S. Kim, A. Needleman & E. Van der Giessen - 2008 - Philosophical Magazine 88 (30-32):3713-3729.
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  28.  8
    Clarifying status of DNNs as models of human vision.Jeffrey S. Bowers, Gaurav Malhotra, Marin Dujmović, Milton L. Montero, Christian Tsvetkov, Valerio Biscione, Guillermo Puebla, Federico Adolfi, John E. Hummel, Rachel F. Heaton, Benjamin D. Evans, Jeffrey Mitchell & Ryan Blything - 2023 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 46:e415.
    On several key issues we agree with the commentators. Perhaps most importantly, everyone seems to agree that psychology has an important role to play in building better models of human vision, and (most) everyone agrees (including us) that deep neural networks (DNNs) will play an important role in modelling human vision going forward. But there are also disagreements about what models are for, how DNN–human correspondences should be evaluated, the value of alternative modelling approaches, and impact of marketing hype in (...)
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  29.  14
    ΕΦΟΔΟΣ and Insinuatio In Greek and Latin Rhetoric.E. W. Bower - 1958 - Classical Quarterly 8 (3-4):224-.
    The rhetorical treatises of Aristotle and Anaximenes, in discussing the introduction of a speech, recognize that a speaker may encounter prejudice on the part of his audience for some reason or other; perhaps because of his own character or reputation, or because of the nature of the case he is pleading, or because his opponent has already won their approval. Anaximenes describes a speaker in this situation as and he and Aristotle give advice on countering such if they have arisen (...)
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  30.  18
    Notes on Juvenal and Statius.E. W. Bower - 1958 - The Classical Review 8 (01):9-11.
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  31.  25
    Phenomenology and the Formal Sciences.Phenomenology of Natural Science.E. Marya Bower, Thomas M. Seebohm, Dagfinn Follesdal, Jitendra Nath Mohanty, Lee Hardy & Lester Embree - 1993 - Philosophical Quarterly 43 (173):574.
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  32. Some Technical Terms in Roman Education.E. Bower - 1961 - Hermes 89 (4):462-477.
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  33.  20
    Prizes and Parasites: Incentive Models for Addressing Chagas Disease.Sara E. Crager & Matt Price - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (2):292-304.
    Despite the enormous progress made in the advancement of health technologies over the last century, infectious diseases continue to cause significant morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Neglected diseases are a subset of infectious diseases that lack treatments that are effective, simple to use, or affordable. Neglected diseases primarily affect populations in poor countries that do not constitute a lucrative market sector, thus failing to provide incentives for the pharmaceutical industry to conduct R&D for these diseases. Of the treatments that (...)
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  34.  26
    Prizes and Parasites: Incentive Models for Addressing Chagas Disease.Sara E. Crager & Matt Price - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (2):292-304.
    Recent advances in immunology have provided a foundation of knowledge to understand many of the intricacies involved in manipulating the human response to fight parasitic infections, and a great deal has been learned from malaria vaccine efforts regarding strategies for developing parasite vaccines. There has been some encouraging progress in the development of a Chagas vaccine in animal models. A prize fund for Chagas could be instrumental in ensuring that these efforts are translated into products that benefit patients.
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  35. Millenarianism and Messianism in Early Modern European Culture. Vol. I: Jewish Messianism in the Early Modern World. Vol. II: Catholic Millenarianism: From Savonarola to the Abbé Grégoire. Vol. III: The Millenarian Turn: Millenarian Contexts of Science, Politics and Everyday Anglo-American Life in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries. Vol. IV: Continental Millenarians: Protestants, Catholics, Heretics. [REVIEW]Matt Goldish, Richard Popkin, Karl A. Kottman, James E. Force, Richard H. Popkin & John Christian Laursen - 2003 - Utopian Studies 14 (2):191-193.
  36.  12
    Athlete Experiences of Shame and Guilt: Initial Psychometric Properties of the Athletic Perceptions of Performance Scale Within Junior Elite Cricketers.Simon M. Rice, Matt S. Treeby, Lisa Olive, Anna E. Saw, Alex Kountouris, Michael Lloyd, Greg Macleod, John W. Orchard, Peter Clarke, Kate Gwyther & Rosemary Purcell - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Guilt and shame are self-conscious emotions with implications for mental health, social and occupational functioning, and the effectiveness of sports practice. To date, the assessment and role of athlete-specific guilt and shame has been under-researched. Reporting data from 174 junior elite cricketers, the present study utilized exploratory factor analysis in validating the Athletic Perceptions of Performance Scale, assessing three distinct and statistically reliable factors: athletic shame-proneness, guilt-proneness, and no-concern. Conditional process analysis indicated that APPS shame-proneness mediated the relationship between general (...)
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  37.  75
    Book reviews. [REVIEW]Jack S. Boozer, Gerhard Böwering, Stephen N. Dunning, Richard E. Palmer, Haim Gordon, J. Kellenberger, Jerald Wallulis, G. Graham White, Thomas O. Buford, C. Stephan Evans & M. Jamie Ferreira - 1988 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 23 (1):43-63.
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  38.  7
    La pensée antique.Jean-François Mattéi - 2015 - Paris: Puf.
    Des présocratiques à Plotin en passant par Socrate, Platon, Aristote, Epicure et les stoïciens, Jean-François Mattéi nous convie à un voyage initiatique dans la philosophie antique. C'est à cette source que la raison occidentale se nourrit depuis des siècles. On y assiste à la naissance de la philosophie, de la physique, des mathématiques, de la politique : éblouissant feu d'artifice de la pensée comme l'histoire en a peu connu depuis lors, et qui continue de résonner dans les débats d'aujourd'hui. En (...)
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  39.  25
    Rhetoric at Rome M. L. Clarke: Rhetoric at Rome. A Historical Survey. Pp. viii+203. London: Cohen & West, 1953. Cloth, 21s. net. [REVIEW]E. W. Bower - 1954 - The Classical Review 4 (3-4):270-272.
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  40.  7
    Rhetoric at Rome. [REVIEW]E. W. Bower - 1954 - The Classical Review 4 (34):270-272.
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  41.  34
    The Effects of Fluency Enhancing Conditions on Sensorimotor Control of Speech in Typically Fluent Speakers: An EEG Mu Rhythm Study.Tiffani Kittilstved, Kevin J. Reilly, Ashley W. Harkrider, Devin Casenhiser, David Thornton, David E. Jenson, Tricia Hedinger, Andrew L. Bowers & Tim Saltuklaroglu - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  42.  37
    Phenomenology, Interpretation, and Community.Lenore Langsdorf, Stephen H. Watson & E. Marya Bower (eds.) - 1996 - State University of New York Press.
    This collection examines the relationship between phenomenology, interpretation, and community, considering the issues from several viewpoints including German idealism, the discourses of the Frankfurt School, and post-structuralist thought.
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  43.  37
    Matt Ridley.¿ Qué nos hace humanos? Trad. Teresa Carretero e Irene Cifuentes. Bogotá: Taurus, 2004. 336 p.Matt Ridley - 2005 - Ideas Y Valores 54 (129).
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  44.  12
    Transitions in Continental Philosophy.Arleen B. Dallery, Stephen H. Watson & E. Marya Bower (eds.) - 1994 - State University of New York Press.
    Twenty papers from a conference in Villanova, Pennsylvania discuss the politics, psychoanalysis and feminist theory, aesthetics, and ethics of phenomenology and existentialism in North America, from its beginnings in the 1940s to its ...
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  45.  66
    Modelling ourselves: what the free energy principle reveals about our implicit notions of representation.Matt Sims & Giovanni Pezzulo - 2021 - Synthese 199 (3-4):7801-7833.
    Predictive processing theories are increasingly popular in philosophy of mind; such process theories often gain support from the Free Energy Principle —a normative principle for adaptive self-organized systems. Yet there is a current and much discussed debate about conflicting philosophical interpretations of FEP, e.g., representational versus non-representational. Here we argue that these different interpretations depend on implicit assumptions about what qualifies as representational. We deploy the Free Energy Principle instrumentally to distinguish four main notions of representation, which focus on organizational, (...)
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  46. Making enactivism even more embodied.Shaun Gallagher & Matthew Bower - 2013 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies (2):232-247.
    The full scope of enactivist approaches to cognition includes not only a focus on sensory-motor contingencies and physical affordances for action, but also an emphasis on affective factors of embodiment and intersubjective affordances for social interaction. This strong conception of embodied cognition calls for a new way to think about the role of the brain in the larger system of brain-body-environment. We ask whether recent work on predictive coding offers a way to think about brain function in an enactive system, (...)
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  47. Propositions are not Simple.Matt Duncan - 2017 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 97 (2):351-366.
    Some philosophers claim that propositions are simple—i.e., lack parts. In this paper, I argue that this claim is mistaken. I start with the widely accepted claim that propositions are the objects of beliefs. Then I argue that the objects of beliefs have parts. Thus, I conclude that propositions are not simple. My argument for the claim that the objects of beliefs have parts derives from the fact that beliefs are productive and systematic. This fact lurks in the background of debates (...)
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  48. Coercing non-liberal persons: Considerations on a more realistic liberalism.Matt Sleat - 2013 - European Journal of Political Theory 12 (4):347-367.
    The central contention of this article is that contemporary liberal theory is without an account of what legitimates coercing those who reject liberalism that is consistent with its own stipulations of the conditions of political legitimacy. After exploring the nature of the liberal principle of legitimacy, and in particular how it is intended to function as a way of protecting individuals from domination and oppression by reconciling freedom and public law, the article considers four different possible accounts of what might (...)
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  49.  20
    Chewing through challenges: Exploring the evolutionary pathways to wood‐feeding in insects.Cristian F. Beza-Beza, Brian M. Wiegmann, Jessica A. Ware, Matt Petersen, Nicole Gunter, Marissa E. Cole, Melbert Schwarz, Matthew A. Bertone, Daniel Young & Aram Mikaelyan - 2024 - Bioessays 46 (5):2300241.
    Decaying wood, while an abundant and stable resource, presents considerable nutritional challenges due to its structural rigidity, chemical recalcitrance, and low nitrogen content. Despite these challenges, certain insect lineages have successfully evolved saproxylophagy (consuming and deriving sustenance from decaying wood), impacting nutrient recycling in ecosystems and carbon sequestration dynamics. This study explores the uneven phylogenetic distribution of saproxylophagy across insects and delves into the evolutionary origins of this trait in disparate insect orders. Employing a comprehensive analysis of gut microbiome data, (...)
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  50. A Challenge to Anti-Criterialism.Matt Duncan - 2014 - Erkenntnis 79 (2):283-296.
    Most theists believe that they will survive death. Indeed, they believe that any given person will survive death and persist into an afterlife while remaining the very same person. In light of this belief, one might ask: how—or, in virtue of what—do people survive death? Perhaps the most natural way to answer this question is by appealing to some general account of personal identity through time. That way one can say that people persist through the time of their death in (...)
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